Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

First published in 1985 by William Morrow, The Cider House Rules is John Irving's sixth novel. Set in rural Maine in the first half of the twentieth century, it tells the story of Dr. Wilbur Larch—saint and obstetrician, founder and director of the orphanage in the town of St. Cloud's, ether addict and abortionist. It is also the story of Dr. Larch's favorite orphan, Homer Wells, who is never adopted.

Topics: Maine, Macabre, Abortions, Doctors, Love Triangle, Adoption, Pregnancy, Ethics, Made into a Movie, Family, Friendship, Morality, Social Class, Friends to Lovers, Childhood, Realism, 20th Century, Male Author, American Author, Contemplative, 1950s, 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, Epic, Dramatic, and Tragic

Published: HarperCollins on Jul 31, 2012
ISBN: 9780062235183
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Cider House Rules
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

amazing book. almost 1000pgs but it kept my interest the entire time! read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I just finished reading this novel, and it is so phenominal that I'm almost speechless, and I'm sad that it is over. The story is engrossing, rich, moving, tragic, and satisfying, and the imagery is extraordinarily powerful. The plot takes place during the first half of the 1900's in rural Maine, and tells of Dr. Larch, an obstetrician, founder of an orphanage, abortionist, and ether addict, and his favorite orphan, and heroic figure, Homer Wells. Irving develops the characters superbly, such that the reader comes to know and love all of them, even those with significant flaws. The abortion issue is handled perfectly; while it becomes obvious what Irving's opinion is, he presents both sides of the issue objectively and refrains from preaching on the subject or becoming overtly political. Normally I recommend reading a book before seeing the movie adaptation, but in this case, the movie is excellent, so by reading the book first, one may not appreciate the film as much as one should. Irving is a storyteller on par with Dickens, and I'm going to add his other works to my future reading list.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is an emotional story, a great read. Really hated that the story ended. Movie does not do the book justice.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

amazing book. almost 1000pgs but it kept my interest the entire time!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I just finished reading this novel, and it is so phenominal that I'm almost speechless, and I'm sad that it is over. The story is engrossing, rich, moving, tragic, and satisfying, and the imagery is extraordinarily powerful. The plot takes place during the first half of the 1900's in rural Maine, and tells of Dr. Larch, an obstetrician, founder of an orphanage, abortionist, and ether addict, and his favorite orphan, and heroic figure, Homer Wells. Irving develops the characters superbly, such that the reader comes to know and love all of them, even those with significant flaws. The abortion issue is handled perfectly; while it becomes obvious what Irving's opinion is, he presents both sides of the issue objectively and refrains from preaching on the subject or becoming overtly political. Normally I recommend reading a book before seeing the movie adaptation, but in this case, the movie is excellent, so by reading the book first, one may not appreciate the film as much as one should. Irving is a storyteller on par with Dickens, and I'm going to add his other works to my future reading list.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is an emotional story, a great read. Really hated that the story ended. Movie does not do the book justice.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the novel that got me hooked on John Irving! Much less bizarre than his other works (which are all bizarre in a good way!), The Cider House Rules manages somehow to be an informative treatis on abortion, a compelling love story, and an examination of human nature at the same time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I haven't reread it since it came out, so I might be able to read it again after all these years. It broke my heart. He got a little carried away with Homer's failed adoptions, but the rest was splendid in a very dramatic way.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wonderful book, wonderful picture
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd