Editor’s Note

“A demystifying journey…”

Ever wondered how your emails actually travel around the world? Blum’s journey to the physical center of the digital world demystifies the World Wide Web for its everyday users.
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher

“Andrew Blum plunges into the unseen but real ether of the Internet in a journey both compelling and profound….You will never open an email in quite the same way again.”
—Tom Vanderbilt, New York Times bestselling author of Traffic

In Tubes, Andrew Blum, a correspondent at Wired magazine, takes us on an engaging, utterly fascinating tour behind the scenes of our everyday lives and reveals the dark beating heart of the Internet itself. A remarkable journey through the brave new technological world we live in, Tubes is to the early twenty-first century what Soul of a New Machine—Tracy Kidder’s classic story of the creation of a new computer—was to the late twentieth.

Topics: The Internet, Communication, Tech Industry, and Informative

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062096753
List price: $10.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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