Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Editor’s Note

“An uncatchable bank robber…”

An uncatchable bank robber and a mysterious suicide form the heart of this complex thriller from one of the masters of Scandinavian crime fiction. Nesbø’s wild twists will keep you guessing until the final pages.
Scribd Editor

Gripping and surprising, Nemesis is a nail-biting thriller from one of the biggest stars in crime fiction.

Grainy closed-circuit television footage shows a man walking into an Oslo bank and putting a gun to a cashier's head. He tells the young woman to count to twenty-five. When the robber doesn't get his money in time, the cashier is executed, and two million Norwegian kroner disappear without a trace. Police Detective Harry Hole is assigned to the case.

While Hole's girlfriend is away in Russia, an old flame decides to get in touch. Former girlfriend and struggling artist Anna Bethsen invites Hole to dinner, and he can't resist a visit. But the evening ends in an all too familiar way as Hole awakens with a thundering headache, a missing cell phone, and no memory of the past twelve hours. That same morning, Anna is found shot dead in her bed. Hole begins to receive threatening e-mails. Is someone trying to frame him for this unexplained death? Meanwhile, the bank robberies continue with unparalleled savagery.

As the death toll continues to mount, Hole becomes a prime suspect in a criminal investigation led by his longtime adversary Tom Waaler and Waaler's vigilante police force. Racing from the cool, autumnal streets of Oslo to the steaming villages of Brazil, Hole is determined to absolve himself of suspicion by uncovering all the information needed to crack both cases. But the ever-threatening Waaler is not finished with his old archenemy quite yet.

*Edgar Nominee for Best Novel of the Year

Topics: Norway, Brazil, Old Flames, Gritty, Ominous, Murder, Gypsies, Alcoholism, Police, Bank Robberies, Guilt, Revenge, Suicide, Norwegian Author, Scandinavian Author, Adultery, and Siblings

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061984587
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Nemesis
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
All I ever seem to say about Agatha Christie books is that they're quite fun, now I've read a bundle of them. I suppose they're all the same, in some ways -- the clue-puzzle is always at the heart of it, not so much the characters. She has a nice touch with describing some characters and getting them just right, of course, and I really love the image of fluffy pink Miss Marple as Nemesis. And I liked Mr Rafiel and his posthumous quest: that was quite a nice plot touch. I got to like his character more, somehow, even though he was already dead.

The main downfall of these books, reading them now, is how dated the attitudes contained therein have become. Especially in this book, with the talk of mental illness and girls crying rape for no real reason, etc -- especially for me, given that my mother's a doctor and works for the police on rape cases, etc, and given that I'm quite irritated by the general perceptions of rape. But it's easy enough to ignore it, and remember that it was written in its moment, for me.more
Another one of Christie's Miss Marple mysteries. The central plotline hinges on the idea that a sweet fluttery elderly lady is an expert in evil and an instrument of justice for the Greek goddess Nemesis. Old sins have long shadows and new victims in this classic mystery.more
In Madly and the Jackal, the story again picks up where the previous book left off. Madly and Jackson have captured the spirit of Wolfhardt and as planned, embark on their quest to return him to his prison and attempt to get into Atlas. They have finally acknowledged their tie and love for one another, no longer denying that which was destined to be between them, and now having just found one another, they risk losing it all to save Atlas and the Mer race. Through Madly's magic and Jackson's strength and wisdom, they are able to get into the city and meet with Madly's father, making a plan to rescue her sister. Something isn't right though. Somehow they have been betrayed. Something much bigger and much worse is after them, and seeks to destroy them. Yet ironically, something that was meant to destroy them, brings them to the place that they commit to one another forever. As they discover and deepen their love for one another, the threat continues and the unthinkable happens. The Lore that they are seeking to capture, use their potions and magic to attempt to erase Jackson's memory of the love he has for Madly. Threatened with the loss of her mate, the one she cannot live without, Madly must pull herself together and capture the Lore, but something dark arises within her, threatening to take over her. Will her love for Jackson and his love for her be enough to pull her through, and can Madly ever recover from the hurt and betrayal that has broken her heart?Okay, I have to go kind of fan girl with this book. I absolutely and completely loved it. OMG - Jackson is simply to die for. How could I have missed this book and Jackson for so as long as I did. He is absolutely yumtastic. The drama in this book totally blew me away. I can't say too much without spoiling it, but at one point, my heart was so crushed I thought I was going to die. For real. I was riding an emotional roller coaster and could not get off. M. Leighton took this series to a whole new level with Madly and the Jackal. My heart strings were pulled upon until I wasn't sure if they could recover, but Leighton pulled this together in the end and I was finally able to breathe again, that is in between the hot, steamy, sexy scenes. I am still on the edge of my seat, anxious to see what is going to happen to these two and this series in the next installment. If you love paranormal romance and the stories dreams are made of, then Madly and the Jackal is one book you will want to put on the top of your TBR list. I can't wait until I have the time to sit down and read it again. With that said, let me leave you with this short excerpt from the book:Cupping the back of my neck with one hand, he pulled me toward him and pressed his lips to my forehead then leaned against it. "You know we can get through anything, right? Whatever it is?" I smiled. "I know. As long as I have you, the rest doesn't matter." "Then the rest will never matter, because you will always have me, Madly. Always." And maybe for the first time ever, I believed him.more
In which I mostly skirt around my incredibly long and ever-expanding views on societal victim-shaming because who has days to type that up and people just want to know about the wacky British people, for godssakeNemesis starts very intriguingly, with Mr. Rafiel, introduced in A Caribbean Mystery leaving Miss Marple in his will twenty-thousand pounds, given she solve a mystery for him. Old hat for Miss Marple, right? Except she won't be told the who, the what, the where, or the when of the crime, only the code word "Nemesis".I feel a little guilty giving this a lower rating than A Caribbean Mystery, as it does feature a much more involving mystery, full of messed-up psycho-sexual dimensions to which Agatha Christie gives much more body than Caribbean trifle. But it is also in need of a judicious amount of editing: it takes a far bit to get moving, the same clues and recaps of events are repeated incessantly, and Christie's style heavily leans on dialogue where a little narration would be a lot more efficient. This undermines the solid core of the story Christie is weaving, but more problematic is her shockingly regressive views, which arise in several contexts, but most specifically as those that shame how young women of "today"(1971 is the publication date) act too "loosely".This is most egregious in some victim-shaming that occurs, which crops up not once but multiple times by several different characters. I chose one example to discuss, just because it's the most elaborated, but the other examples are much the same. **MILD SPOILERS, if you don't want to know anything about what the case is** The following are words from a crime/police-psychologist, who thinks the man in question does not have the personality of someone capable of the murder of a girlfriend for which he's been convicted. Said convict is a known compulsive liar, thief, gangster, delinquent baby daddy, and who was involved in a previous assault case with another girlfriend: (excuse the length, but I wanted to give you the fullest context necessary)"That [earlier case] told against him, of course. Not in the jury's mind, because of course they did not hear about that until after the judge's summing up, but certainly in the judge's mind [...] I made a few inquiries myself afterwards. He had assaulted a girl. He had conceivably raped her, but he had not attempted to strangle her and in my opinion--I have seen a great many cases which come before the assizes--it seemed to me highly unlikely that there was a very definite case case of rape. Girls, you must remember, are far more ready to be raped nowadays than they used to be. Their mothers insists, very often, that they should call it rape. The girl in question had had several boy friends who had gone further than friendship. I did not think it counted very greatly as evidence against him. The actual murder case--yes, that was undoubtedly murder--but I continued to feel by all the tests [...] none of them accorded with this particular crime." Yes, a man who fits many of the dimensions by which we define sociopathy, and who has a history of violence towards a girlfriend, is totally incapable of committing a murder (of which he was convicted even without the details of the assault-case being heard at trial, a trial where he had the best defense money could buy). He beat her, but he didn't strangle her, so he's clearly he's a nonviolent soul. Women who have had several boyfriends cannot be raped. She's lying. These later two implications are particularly horrible and hurtful, because besides being ugly and ignorant and false, are also much more prevalent even today than they should be in any right-minded society.**end spoilers**I'm not demonizing Agatha Christie. I haven't read enough of her to characterize her work as a whole or to really disseminate her worldview. But I do think it's very telling looking at the publication dates of her most popular works, that most of them were from the 30s and 40s and none of them were from the 60s or the 70s. As a character, Miss Marple represents to me a subversive celebration of qualities that are normally derided in Western culture as being stereotypical-elderly-people traits-- and so it's incredibly disappointing to have her instead be a figurehead of stereotypical qualities are just plain ugly.Note: Nemesis is the basis of one of my favorite Agatha Christie's Marple episodes (2007), staring Geraldine McEwan. It's a little camp and a lot of fun, and it irons out most of the unfortunate implications. I recommend the series in general. It's nice slight viewing that has a great sense of humor about itself.more
This is the 9th c hristie book i've read. It came out in 1971, just four years before Christie's death in 1975. Miss Marple is given a vague assignment by a man she had encountered in the West Indies who has died. He seeks to have his wayward son cleared of a murder he doesn't think he committed. Miss Marple goes on the bus tour of gardens and houses in England designated by the dead man, and when the tourt gets to a certain town she is invited to stay at the house of three sisters. There are 2 old murders and one new one and of course Miss maple solves them all. The scenario nis very contrived and everything goes like clockwork, in typical Christie fashion. I read it with interest but it does not compare with the realy great Christie novels such as And Then There Were None and The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. But it was OK.more
Nemesis by Agatha Christie features Miss Jane Marple as she embarks upon a quest that a previous acquaintance has asked her to complete. She feels compelled to do this as the request came from beyond the grave. She is supplied tickets to a coach tour of Beautiful Homes and Gardens, and having no real knowledge of what she is supposed to discover, off she goes.Tension mounts slowly in this book as Miss Marple painstakingly puts the pieces together and finally realizes that she is to be the Nemesis for someone who got away with murder a number of years ago. She must study the characters around her, both on the tour and in the countryside where they stay. With her uncanny knack for sensing evil on full alert, it isn’t too long before murder is on the agenda, and Jane Marple must tread very carefully or she could very well be in great danger as well.This was an interesting mystery that had Miss Marple more actively involved then usual. Instead of being overlooked while she observes all quietly from a corner, this time Miss Marple is front and center in the storyline as she takes control of the investigation. A well-done, entertaining mystery, that suffers a little from a slow start but the suspense builds nicely.more
This just didn't hold my interest long enough to get into it, and these days I haven't got the reading time to waste on books that don't get me 'in' right from the start. Shame, because I've just discovered Agatha Christie's novels!more
Classic Ms. Marple -- what's not to love? And this is actually one of her best -- but read Caribbean Mystery first.more
I thought it was an above average mystery, with some deep themes about love and the dark side of love.more
I love Agatha Christie! Nemesis is the goddess of retribution, and that is what Miss Marple is in this story. Nemesis is a Miss Marple mystery, and I have to say, it is probably my favorite Miss Marple mystery (my favorite Agatha novels are from Poirot). Miss Marple is thrown into a mystery by a letter of an old friend, and she has pretty much nothing to start with. It's very fun seeing how she begins to collect this information throughout the story, as opposed to other mysteries where she has some facts to start with.more
Although this is a very late Christie, written well beyond her golden era, the opening chapter is a sheer delight in the author's classic style, as Miss Marple indulges in a long, discursive meditation on reading the newspapers.Miss M., despite being considerably aged and lame ("On'e feet are not what one would like feet to be," she silently laments as she contemplates her infirmities), she's still very sharp, if a bit more scattered, and able to spot a killer with ease. The careful reader will spot the truth fairly early on, but getting to Miss Marple's conclusions is interesting, if not as much fun as the earlier novels. One thing that makes this less than her best book is the absence of some of the characters from her standard books. A good relaxing read, but not her best book.If you like Christie, do give this a chance.more
The last of the Marple novels to be written, and the second last in chronological order. It shows, with Miss Marple feeling her age, and feeling the loss of her ability to tend to her garden herself. But her gardening skills feature strongly in this book, as she uses them to test the claimed background of various suspects. Marple herself doesn't know what the mystery is at first, because she has been asked by an acquaintence from a previous case to investigate something for him -- only the request is set up to be delivered after his death, and with no actual information about the case, simpy instructions that take her to places where she can observe and form her own conclusions untainted by his biases. Marple is indeed the Nemesis that Jason Rafiel was hoping for, bringing a late but much-needed justice to an old case.I thought the writing could have been tighter, but Marple herself was a delight in this book. Enjoyed this a lot.more
Kinda dull, but still a good cozy mystery!more
Re-read after watching the travesty that was the "Marple" TV adapataion (which seems to have been written by someone who read a brief summary the plot and had not paid attention in either history or RE classes at school). It is a much better book, Miss Marple, at the behest of a recently dead acquaintance is sent on a coach tour with instructions to right a wrong, to see justice done, in fact to once again become Nemesis in a pink fluffy shawl. Excellent.more
Mr Rafiel, from 'A Caribbean Mystery' has died and has has left Miss Marple £20,000 if she agrees to undertake an investigation. Although he gives her no clues as to who or what he wants her to look into, Miss Marple agrees to undertake the task and is sent on a coach tour of English country houses and gardens. When one of her companions is killed, Miss Marple discovers just whose death Mr Rafiel wanted her to investigate and why. Ultimately she discovers just how destructive and terrible love can be. This is one of my favourite Miss Marple novels.more
A bit too contrived for my taste.more
Rafiel leaves Miss Marple a mystery in his will. Two mysteries, in fact, since she must figure out what the mysery is first! Without knowing any details, she must undertake to correct an injustice.This novel meanders through coach tours, English gardens and village life before arriving at the core of the mystery.more
Read them all......My favorites are the Miss Marples.......more
Perhaps my favorite Agatha Christie to date.more
I forgot how long Jo made me wait before he lets Harry take care of the Prince. I love every tortuous minute of it. You master, you.
more
For most readers of the noir genre, Nemesis would rate 5 stars but this reader had some difficulty with the author's shifting back and forth in time technique and the constantly playing catch-up that the plot required. I hope there is a sequel, although this work stands on its own, the ending begs for a resolution much like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo did. Our hero, Harry Hole, the flawed detective is brilliant at working through clues, even if he has to revisit and refine his conclusions or at times, drop them completely and reboot. In the end, Nemesis is well worth the brain exercise the author puts you through and I look forward to the next Harry Hole in this series.more
Read all 24 reviews

Reviews

All I ever seem to say about Agatha Christie books is that they're quite fun, now I've read a bundle of them. I suppose they're all the same, in some ways -- the clue-puzzle is always at the heart of it, not so much the characters. She has a nice touch with describing some characters and getting them just right, of course, and I really love the image of fluffy pink Miss Marple as Nemesis. And I liked Mr Rafiel and his posthumous quest: that was quite a nice plot touch. I got to like his character more, somehow, even though he was already dead.

The main downfall of these books, reading them now, is how dated the attitudes contained therein have become. Especially in this book, with the talk of mental illness and girls crying rape for no real reason, etc -- especially for me, given that my mother's a doctor and works for the police on rape cases, etc, and given that I'm quite irritated by the general perceptions of rape. But it's easy enough to ignore it, and remember that it was written in its moment, for me.more
Another one of Christie's Miss Marple mysteries. The central plotline hinges on the idea that a sweet fluttery elderly lady is an expert in evil and an instrument of justice for the Greek goddess Nemesis. Old sins have long shadows and new victims in this classic mystery.more
In Madly and the Jackal, the story again picks up where the previous book left off. Madly and Jackson have captured the spirit of Wolfhardt and as planned, embark on their quest to return him to his prison and attempt to get into Atlas. They have finally acknowledged their tie and love for one another, no longer denying that which was destined to be between them, and now having just found one another, they risk losing it all to save Atlas and the Mer race. Through Madly's magic and Jackson's strength and wisdom, they are able to get into the city and meet with Madly's father, making a plan to rescue her sister. Something isn't right though. Somehow they have been betrayed. Something much bigger and much worse is after them, and seeks to destroy them. Yet ironically, something that was meant to destroy them, brings them to the place that they commit to one another forever. As they discover and deepen their love for one another, the threat continues and the unthinkable happens. The Lore that they are seeking to capture, use their potions and magic to attempt to erase Jackson's memory of the love he has for Madly. Threatened with the loss of her mate, the one she cannot live without, Madly must pull herself together and capture the Lore, but something dark arises within her, threatening to take over her. Will her love for Jackson and his love for her be enough to pull her through, and can Madly ever recover from the hurt and betrayal that has broken her heart?Okay, I have to go kind of fan girl with this book. I absolutely and completely loved it. OMG - Jackson is simply to die for. How could I have missed this book and Jackson for so as long as I did. He is absolutely yumtastic. The drama in this book totally blew me away. I can't say too much without spoiling it, but at one point, my heart was so crushed I thought I was going to die. For real. I was riding an emotional roller coaster and could not get off. M. Leighton took this series to a whole new level with Madly and the Jackal. My heart strings were pulled upon until I wasn't sure if they could recover, but Leighton pulled this together in the end and I was finally able to breathe again, that is in between the hot, steamy, sexy scenes. I am still on the edge of my seat, anxious to see what is going to happen to these two and this series in the next installment. If you love paranormal romance and the stories dreams are made of, then Madly and the Jackal is one book you will want to put on the top of your TBR list. I can't wait until I have the time to sit down and read it again. With that said, let me leave you with this short excerpt from the book:Cupping the back of my neck with one hand, he pulled me toward him and pressed his lips to my forehead then leaned against it. "You know we can get through anything, right? Whatever it is?" I smiled. "I know. As long as I have you, the rest doesn't matter." "Then the rest will never matter, because you will always have me, Madly. Always." And maybe for the first time ever, I believed him.more
In which I mostly skirt around my incredibly long and ever-expanding views on societal victim-shaming because who has days to type that up and people just want to know about the wacky British people, for godssakeNemesis starts very intriguingly, with Mr. Rafiel, introduced in A Caribbean Mystery leaving Miss Marple in his will twenty-thousand pounds, given she solve a mystery for him. Old hat for Miss Marple, right? Except she won't be told the who, the what, the where, or the when of the crime, only the code word "Nemesis".I feel a little guilty giving this a lower rating than A Caribbean Mystery, as it does feature a much more involving mystery, full of messed-up psycho-sexual dimensions to which Agatha Christie gives much more body than Caribbean trifle. But it is also in need of a judicious amount of editing: it takes a far bit to get moving, the same clues and recaps of events are repeated incessantly, and Christie's style heavily leans on dialogue where a little narration would be a lot more efficient. This undermines the solid core of the story Christie is weaving, but more problematic is her shockingly regressive views, which arise in several contexts, but most specifically as those that shame how young women of "today"(1971 is the publication date) act too "loosely".This is most egregious in some victim-shaming that occurs, which crops up not once but multiple times by several different characters. I chose one example to discuss, just because it's the most elaborated, but the other examples are much the same. **MILD SPOILERS, if you don't want to know anything about what the case is** The following are words from a crime/police-psychologist, who thinks the man in question does not have the personality of someone capable of the murder of a girlfriend for which he's been convicted. Said convict is a known compulsive liar, thief, gangster, delinquent baby daddy, and who was involved in a previous assault case with another girlfriend: (excuse the length, but I wanted to give you the fullest context necessary)"That [earlier case] told against him, of course. Not in the jury's mind, because of course they did not hear about that until after the judge's summing up, but certainly in the judge's mind [...] I made a few inquiries myself afterwards. He had assaulted a girl. He had conceivably raped her, but he had not attempted to strangle her and in my opinion--I have seen a great many cases which come before the assizes--it seemed to me highly unlikely that there was a very definite case case of rape. Girls, you must remember, are far more ready to be raped nowadays than they used to be. Their mothers insists, very often, that they should call it rape. The girl in question had had several boy friends who had gone further than friendship. I did not think it counted very greatly as evidence against him. The actual murder case--yes, that was undoubtedly murder--but I continued to feel by all the tests [...] none of them accorded with this particular crime." Yes, a man who fits many of the dimensions by which we define sociopathy, and who has a history of violence towards a girlfriend, is totally incapable of committing a murder (of which he was convicted even without the details of the assault-case being heard at trial, a trial where he had the best defense money could buy). He beat her, but he didn't strangle her, so he's clearly he's a nonviolent soul. Women who have had several boyfriends cannot be raped. She's lying. These later two implications are particularly horrible and hurtful, because besides being ugly and ignorant and false, are also much more prevalent even today than they should be in any right-minded society.**end spoilers**I'm not demonizing Agatha Christie. I haven't read enough of her to characterize her work as a whole or to really disseminate her worldview. But I do think it's very telling looking at the publication dates of her most popular works, that most of them were from the 30s and 40s and none of them were from the 60s or the 70s. As a character, Miss Marple represents to me a subversive celebration of qualities that are normally derided in Western culture as being stereotypical-elderly-people traits-- and so it's incredibly disappointing to have her instead be a figurehead of stereotypical qualities are just plain ugly.Note: Nemesis is the basis of one of my favorite Agatha Christie's Marple episodes (2007), staring Geraldine McEwan. It's a little camp and a lot of fun, and it irons out most of the unfortunate implications. I recommend the series in general. It's nice slight viewing that has a great sense of humor about itself.more
This is the 9th c hristie book i've read. It came out in 1971, just four years before Christie's death in 1975. Miss Marple is given a vague assignment by a man she had encountered in the West Indies who has died. He seeks to have his wayward son cleared of a murder he doesn't think he committed. Miss Marple goes on the bus tour of gardens and houses in England designated by the dead man, and when the tourt gets to a certain town she is invited to stay at the house of three sisters. There are 2 old murders and one new one and of course Miss maple solves them all. The scenario nis very contrived and everything goes like clockwork, in typical Christie fashion. I read it with interest but it does not compare with the realy great Christie novels such as And Then There Were None and The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. But it was OK.more
Nemesis by Agatha Christie features Miss Jane Marple as she embarks upon a quest that a previous acquaintance has asked her to complete. She feels compelled to do this as the request came from beyond the grave. She is supplied tickets to a coach tour of Beautiful Homes and Gardens, and having no real knowledge of what she is supposed to discover, off she goes.Tension mounts slowly in this book as Miss Marple painstakingly puts the pieces together and finally realizes that she is to be the Nemesis for someone who got away with murder a number of years ago. She must study the characters around her, both on the tour and in the countryside where they stay. With her uncanny knack for sensing evil on full alert, it isn’t too long before murder is on the agenda, and Jane Marple must tread very carefully or she could very well be in great danger as well.This was an interesting mystery that had Miss Marple more actively involved then usual. Instead of being overlooked while she observes all quietly from a corner, this time Miss Marple is front and center in the storyline as she takes control of the investigation. A well-done, entertaining mystery, that suffers a little from a slow start but the suspense builds nicely.more
This just didn't hold my interest long enough to get into it, and these days I haven't got the reading time to waste on books that don't get me 'in' right from the start. Shame, because I've just discovered Agatha Christie's novels!more
Classic Ms. Marple -- what's not to love? And this is actually one of her best -- but read Caribbean Mystery first.more
I thought it was an above average mystery, with some deep themes about love and the dark side of love.more
I love Agatha Christie! Nemesis is the goddess of retribution, and that is what Miss Marple is in this story. Nemesis is a Miss Marple mystery, and I have to say, it is probably my favorite Miss Marple mystery (my favorite Agatha novels are from Poirot). Miss Marple is thrown into a mystery by a letter of an old friend, and she has pretty much nothing to start with. It's very fun seeing how she begins to collect this information throughout the story, as opposed to other mysteries where she has some facts to start with.more
Although this is a very late Christie, written well beyond her golden era, the opening chapter is a sheer delight in the author's classic style, as Miss Marple indulges in a long, discursive meditation on reading the newspapers.Miss M., despite being considerably aged and lame ("On'e feet are not what one would like feet to be," she silently laments as she contemplates her infirmities), she's still very sharp, if a bit more scattered, and able to spot a killer with ease. The careful reader will spot the truth fairly early on, but getting to Miss Marple's conclusions is interesting, if not as much fun as the earlier novels. One thing that makes this less than her best book is the absence of some of the characters from her standard books. A good relaxing read, but not her best book.If you like Christie, do give this a chance.more
The last of the Marple novels to be written, and the second last in chronological order. It shows, with Miss Marple feeling her age, and feeling the loss of her ability to tend to her garden herself. But her gardening skills feature strongly in this book, as she uses them to test the claimed background of various suspects. Marple herself doesn't know what the mystery is at first, because she has been asked by an acquaintence from a previous case to investigate something for him -- only the request is set up to be delivered after his death, and with no actual information about the case, simpy instructions that take her to places where she can observe and form her own conclusions untainted by his biases. Marple is indeed the Nemesis that Jason Rafiel was hoping for, bringing a late but much-needed justice to an old case.I thought the writing could have been tighter, but Marple herself was a delight in this book. Enjoyed this a lot.more
Kinda dull, but still a good cozy mystery!more
Re-read after watching the travesty that was the "Marple" TV adapataion (which seems to have been written by someone who read a brief summary the plot and had not paid attention in either history or RE classes at school). It is a much better book, Miss Marple, at the behest of a recently dead acquaintance is sent on a coach tour with instructions to right a wrong, to see justice done, in fact to once again become Nemesis in a pink fluffy shawl. Excellent.more
Mr Rafiel, from 'A Caribbean Mystery' has died and has has left Miss Marple £20,000 if she agrees to undertake an investigation. Although he gives her no clues as to who or what he wants her to look into, Miss Marple agrees to undertake the task and is sent on a coach tour of English country houses and gardens. When one of her companions is killed, Miss Marple discovers just whose death Mr Rafiel wanted her to investigate and why. Ultimately she discovers just how destructive and terrible love can be. This is one of my favourite Miss Marple novels.more
A bit too contrived for my taste.more
Rafiel leaves Miss Marple a mystery in his will. Two mysteries, in fact, since she must figure out what the mysery is first! Without knowing any details, she must undertake to correct an injustice.This novel meanders through coach tours, English gardens and village life before arriving at the core of the mystery.more
Read them all......My favorites are the Miss Marples.......more
Perhaps my favorite Agatha Christie to date.more
I forgot how long Jo made me wait before he lets Harry take care of the Prince. I love every tortuous minute of it. You master, you.
more
For most readers of the noir genre, Nemesis would rate 5 stars but this reader had some difficulty with the author's shifting back and forth in time technique and the constantly playing catch-up that the plot required. I hope there is a sequel, although this work stands on its own, the ending begs for a resolution much like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo did. Our hero, Harry Hole, the flawed detective is brilliant at working through clues, even if he has to revisit and refine his conclusions or at times, drop them completely and reboot. In the end, Nemesis is well worth the brain exercise the author puts you through and I look forward to the next Harry Hole in this series.more
Load more
scribd