Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

From gifted new writer Tasha Alexander comes a stunning novel of historical suspense set in Victorian England, meticulously researched and with a twisty plot that involves stolen antiquities, betrayal, and murder

And Only to Deceive

For Emily, accepting the proposal of Philip, the Viscount Ashton, was an easy way to escape her overbearing mother, who was set on a grand society match. So when Emily's dashing husband died on safari soon after their wedding, she felt little grief. After all, she barely knew him. Now, nearly two years later, she discovers that Philip was a far different man from the one she had married so cavalierly. His journals reveal him to have been a gentleman scholar and antiquities collector who, to her surprise, was deeply in love with his wife. Emily becomes fascinated with this new image of her dead husband and she immerses herself in all things ancient and begins to study Greek.

Emily's intellectual pursuits and her desire to learn more about Philip take her to the quiet corridors of the British Museum, one of her husband's favorite places. There, amid priceless ancient statues, she uncovers a dark, dangerous secret involving stolen artifacts from the Greco-Roman galleries. And to complicate matters, she's juggling two very prominent and wealthy suitors, one of whose intentions may go beyond the marrying kind. As she sets out to solve the crime, her search leads to more surprises about Philip and causes her to question the role in Victorian society to which she, as a woman, is relegated.

Topics: Theft

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061739231
List price: $10.39
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for And Only to Deceive
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

OK historical crime fiction set in late 19th century Britain, among the upper crust. I didn't find the heroine particularly taking, but the story held my interest long enough to get me through the book. Good stuff for addicts of historical crime novels.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A somewhat enjoyable read, but not what I expected based on the plot description (but really, are those ever accurate?). As much as the author wanted to write a realistic depiction of a widowed young woman in the 1890s rather than drop characters from the 20th century into historical situations (mentioned in the author notes), that's what she's done. So many aspects of the characters just didn't ring true based on societal mores the author herself pointed out throughout the story. In addition, the characterization of the heroine was weak, the mystery was pretty disappointing, and the resolution was very contrived.

Oh, and also--I just don't see so many men of the time falling so passionately in love with this character. Take out some of the overwrought emotion on the part of the men, and it could have been better.

But even with all of its faults, I was looking forward to reading more whenever I got the chance, hence the 3 stars.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This debut novel seems to be an attempt to imitate the Lady Julia Gray novels of Deanna Raybourn. And Only to Deceive is to be the first of a series of Lady Emily Ashton novels. Both the Lady Julia Gray and the Lady Emily Ashton series combine the Victorian England genre (Jane Austen, Georgette Heyer) with a mystery, and both begin with a young widow as the main character. Unfortunately, Deanna Raybourn does it better. Alexander's novel lacked the witty dialogue typical of the genre. There was plenty of dialogue--perhaps too much, even--but it felt flat, stilted, and unconvincing. Lady Emily, who doesn't fall in love with her husband until nearly two years AFTER his death, seems more ridiculous than likeable. The many references to the Iliad felt pretentious. There is potential for this author to improve her craft, but for the time being, I'd stick with Raybourn.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

OK historical crime fiction set in late 19th century Britain, among the upper crust. I didn't find the heroine particularly taking, but the story held my interest long enough to get me through the book. Good stuff for addicts of historical crime novels.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A somewhat enjoyable read, but not what I expected based on the plot description (but really, are those ever accurate?). As much as the author wanted to write a realistic depiction of a widowed young woman in the 1890s rather than drop characters from the 20th century into historical situations (mentioned in the author notes), that's what she's done. So many aspects of the characters just didn't ring true based on societal mores the author herself pointed out throughout the story. In addition, the characterization of the heroine was weak, the mystery was pretty disappointing, and the resolution was very contrived.

Oh, and also--I just don't see so many men of the time falling so passionately in love with this character. Take out some of the overwrought emotion on the part of the men, and it could have been better.

But even with all of its faults, I was looking forward to reading more whenever I got the chance, hence the 3 stars.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This debut novel seems to be an attempt to imitate the Lady Julia Gray novels of Deanna Raybourn. And Only to Deceive is to be the first of a series of Lady Emily Ashton novels. Both the Lady Julia Gray and the Lady Emily Ashton series combine the Victorian England genre (Jane Austen, Georgette Heyer) with a mystery, and both begin with a young widow as the main character. Unfortunately, Deanna Raybourn does it better. Alexander's novel lacked the witty dialogue typical of the genre. There was plenty of dialogue--perhaps too much, even--but it felt flat, stilted, and unconvincing. Lady Emily, who doesn't fall in love with her husband until nearly two years AFTER his death, seems more ridiculous than likeable. The many references to the Iliad felt pretentious. There is potential for this author to improve her craft, but for the time being, I'd stick with Raybourn.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Emily marries the Viscount Ashton primarily to get away from her overbearing mother. When he dies in Africa shortly after their wedding she has reason to question that she knew the man at all. She sets about trying to unravel the mystery of his life and death endangering herself and displeasing pretty much everyone. A good read with a very likeable heroine.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is an interesting first novel in a series I hadn’t heard of until my SantaThing partner selected this book for me and I’m really glad she did.One of the things I really enjoyed was the idea of Emily getting to know her husband only after he’d been dead for 18 months, having married him to escape her mother, together with the growing realisation that the marriage she was creating in her head probably wouldn’t have existed. Emily is a strong, independent character who is resistance to the mores imposed on a woman by society and her mother, which sets up some nice little set pieces.The outcome of the mystery – who is selling fakes to the British Museum – is fairly obvious from about halfway through the book, and the characters do start to conform to generic ideas of hero, villain etc., but this is, I hope a rookie mistake. As always with American writers writing about British characters there are anachronism which grate on this British reader. However these are minor quibbles as all in all this is good debut and I shall look out for other books in the series.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
i can't say that this book lives up to its title - it certainly wasn't suspenseful. the prose and dialogue were stilted, the characters bland, and the pace plodding, which is a shame because the premise seemed to have a lot of promise and about the first page or so caught my interest - art theft and forgery, ancient greece, and tragic love. the plot was also very transparent, and i'm usually not even good about anticipating a book's twists and turns, especially when the book in question is trying to be tricky and suspenseful. other reviews have expressed admiration for the narrator as an uncoventional heroine determined to achieve self-actualization. she rebells against society's strictures, educating herself, drinking port, traveling, and unmasking criminals, all of which is meant to endear her to me as a modern, independent, strong woman, i suppose. but i couldn't engage in the story on her behalf. i found her cold and boring, (mostly because the book just wasn't that well written,) an impersonal guide in the unfolding of a bland mystery. in short, i could not derive even a modicum of enjoyment from this book. boo.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd