• book

From the Publisher

Set in rural Montana in the early 1990s, emily m. danforth’s The Miseducation of Cameron Post is a powerful and widely acclaimed YA coming-of-age novel in the tradition of the classic Annie on My Mind.
 
Cameron Post feels a mix of guilt and relief when her parents die in a car accident. Their deaths mean they will never learn the truth she eventually comes to—that she's gay. Orphaned, Cameron comes to live with her old-fashioned grandmother and ultraconservative aunt Ruth. There she falls in love with her best friend, a beautiful cowgirl. When she’s eventually outed, her aunt sends her to God’s Promise, a religious conversion camp that is supposed to “cure” her homosexuality. At the camp, Cameron comes face to face with the cost of denying her true identity.
 
The Miseducation of Cameron Post is a stunning and provocative literary debut that was a finalist for the YALSA Morris Award and was named to numerous “best” lists.

Topics: Small Town, Montana, Rural, 1990s, Bildungsroman, Realistic, LGBTQ, Lesbian Characters, Coming of Age, Orphans, Coming Out, Death, Family, Grandmothers, Friendship, Sexuality, Christianity, Drugs, Female Friendship, Female Protagonist, First Person Narration, 21st Century, Poignant, Heartfelt, Female Author, and American Author

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062101969
List price: $9.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Miseducation of Cameron Post
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

TIME
2 min read

When Less Plot Is Actually More

AFTER WRITING SEVEN NOVELS AND three works of nonfiction, acclaimed British author Rachel Cusk began to find fiction “fake and embarrassing.” Two years ago, she explained to a British newspaper, “Once you have suffered sufficiently, the idea of making up John and Jane and having them do things together seems utterly ridiculous.” No surprise, then, that her 2014 novel Outline was anything but plot-driven. It was more like a series of observations by a narrator as she traveled to Greece to teach writing. The people she met along the way essentially became the subjects of miniature profiles craf
New York Magazine
2 min read

Our Book Critic’s 5 Most Anticipated

AGAINST EVERYTHING: ESSAYS SEPT. 6, BY MARK GREIF Following on the heels of last year’s ambitious, if somewhat clunkily titled The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933–1973, Grief’s new book collects more than a decade’s worth of provocations from a founder of n+1. In it, he traces the arc of a young intellectual through the Bush and Obama administrations, from the gym to the ramparts. SUBSTITUTE: GOING TO SCHOOL WITH A THOUSAND KIDS SEPT. 6, BY NICHOLSON BAKER Baker is an obsessive with immense powers of observation, a strong social conscience, and, as those fam
The Atlantic
8 min read
Psychology

The Best Writing Advice of 2016

2016 was not an easy year to be a writer. Not just because of the constant, concentration-wrecking pull of our devices, their glowing screens beckoning with the promise of fresh horrors. I’ve spoken with many writers, in recent months, who seem to be facing a deeper, starker crisis of purpose since the election of Donald Trump. They’re asking themselves: Is making literature an acceptable pursuit in a world with such urgent, tangible needs? And if so, how should I use my words? It’s a deeply personal line of questioning, and I can’t supply any answers here—I’m still working things out for myse