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This New York Times bestselling novel and National Book Award nominee from acclaimed author Walter Dean Myers tells the story of Steve Harmon, a teenage boy in juvenile detention and on trial. Presented as a screenplay of Steve's own imagination, and peppered with journal entries, the book shows how one single decision can change our whole lives.

Fade In: Interior: Early Morning In Cell Block D, Manhattan Detention Center.

Steve (Voice-Over)
Sometimes I feel like I have walked into the middle of a movie. Maybe I can make my own movie. The film will be the story of my life. No, not my life, but of this experience. I'll call it what the lady prosecutor called me ... Monster.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Topics: New York City, Prison, Peer Pressure, Murder, Urban, Race Relations, Crime, Discrimination, Prisoners, Emotional, Realistic, Suspenseful, Epistolary Novels, Play Script, First Person Narration, Realism, African American Author, American Author, Male Author, Survival, and 20th Century

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061975028
List price: $9.99
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It's a great book that has a wonderful plot to it you'll fall in love with the book after you read it
more
very good book more
great. must readmore
I loved this audiobook with the film script format! The story is very 12 Angry Men from the perspective of the accused Teen. more
I liked the journal and film script way of telling the story. It was so interesting to get inside the head of a sixteen-year-old boy on trial for murder with uncertain ties to the event. Not as gritty as one might think. Most of the harsh prison life details are left out, with only references to actions, rather than graphic descriptions.more
Solid, popular, boy-centered book. Never go wrong with Walter Dean Myersmore
I surprisingly liked this book. I thought I wouldn't based on the style the story is presented (it's written in both script format and as a journal entry), but once I got used to the jarring quality of the script, I found it made for a quick read.

The subject is obviously a tough one, but I think it's well presented and does a fantastic job of showcasing truth and reality of life.

I found the content fascinating and while some of the character's are questionable (i'm still unsure of whether Steve was actually in the drugstore...he kept mentioning he went in for mints...) the overall message of good over evil and the justice system prevailing still managed to come across.

It would have been an entirely different book and commentary if the ending hadn't happened the way it did.more
I wanted to like this better, but there just wasn't much depth to it. I thought the writing style - being written as a screenplay - would be distracting, but it was enjoyable.more
First person narrative of a kid going through a trial that might end in a life sentence. He writes his experiences down in a notebook as a film script and director's notes. Inventive format, really compellingly blunt narrative.more
Monster is the story of Steve Harmon, a young man from the Harlem neighborhood who is facing a charge of felony murder. The book opens with the gripping image of Steve crying quietly in his cell while a fellow prisoner is being beaten and raped. Steve tells his story through a series of journal entries and a move script. The script is especially used for Steve to process the situation that he is going through. In his journal entries and film sequences, Steve ponders his own perceived innocence, shares scenes from life in the prison, and recounts events that led to his accusation. The journal entries as well as the interwoven court scenes are well crafted. However, the close reader notices the discrepancies between Steve's testimony in court and the facts that he relates in his journal. This might lead the reader to pass a "guilty" verdict on Steve Harmon. However, throughout the story, the author has created so much ambiguity and nuance in the terms "guilty" and "innocent', that it is hard to make a resolute judgement. Prisoners speak of their crimes as "mistakes", and out of delusion believe themselves to be innocent. Others quibble about "truth", and feel that telling their own version of the story is acceptable in light of the true horrors of life in prison. These conversations take place right before Steve's testimony in court, leaving readers wondering what the truth really is. This question haunts the reader even after the story is over, in the same way that Steve is ever after haunted by his identity as a "monster".I liked this book because of the mystery that it maintains, and the question marks that it leaves you with. I think that this book speaks to young people because it deals with decision-making, acquaintance choices, helplessness, and identity crises.The book gives plenty of room for teachers to discuss the difference between perception and actual truth with their students. This would be a great book to teach to a classroom full of tough customers, and it is short enough and an easy enough read to assign to young people with the expectation that they read it on their own.more
This is a great book. The story is about boy named Steve Harmon. Steve is a young, black, terrified teenager. Steve is living in New York state with his mother, father and little brother. He is in trial for a murder. During this trial, Steve uses past and present timing to get the reader involved in the text. This fast-moving book was written like a movie script. There is a lot of drama in the book also. This book kept my attention throughout the whole story. The guessing and wondering keeps you on the edge of your seat. I have a concern about this book. Such as, what grade level should a teacher give this type of book to her students to read for a discussion? We need to make sure our classroom children are ready for books like this one. I liked how it gave a lot of different examples of how things are brought up in the court room. Showing differently aged children how the court works with different examples, like the book Monster, might keep the classroom from doing bad things to go to jail. I liked this book a lot. It is a very detailed book, and it is great for teenagers to see what goes on in the court room. I think every student around the age of nine should have to read this book as he or she is approaching the peer pressure years of a teenager. I have seen many of my friends have to go to court for different reasons and getting a feel for the way they ask questions can be quite scary. This book could be a guide to being honest and wanting to do the correct things in life. I would recommend this book to any child that wanted a quick, fun read.more
Monster is about a young teenage boy, Steve, who is accused of committing a crime at a drug store. One of his acquaintances, Bobo, places him at the scene of the crime, telling the jury that he was a part of the illegal act. Now it is up to the lawers and jury to decide the fate of this young man. The book is written in a script because after all was said and done, Steve made his experience into a movie. Teaching this book to a class would be great. It relates to so many kids who are living in dangerous areas and who sometimes associate with the wrong people. One good theme about this book that a teacher could point out to his/her students is that one must be wise in choosing who the associate with. Steve was a harmless guy, but since he chose to talk to the neighborhood criminals, they threw him under the bus and accused him of murder. Another good point about this book is that no matter what type of situation one is in, it is always important to always believe in yourself. Do not let someone wrongly accuse you of something you know you did not do. I actually liked this book. It was very easy to read and kept you interested in what was going to happen next. I cannot say that I can relate to this young boy, but I can only imagine that this was the worst experience of his life. My heart goes out to those who are wrongly accused of a crime. I know for a fact that I do not like people blaming me for something that I know I did not do. Growing up, I was brought up in a good town and great school and it just breaks my heart to think that crime, in some cities, happens daily and that it has no effect on some of the people.more
Steve Harmon was a simple boy just trying to make it through school. He saw life as a movie waiting to be produced and directed. A turn of events happen that Steve's life forever. He is charged with murder. Behind bars he is, waiting for his trail. Did he really help with a murder? Is he really a monster? Themes in "Monster" revolved around crime and actual life. Some of the themes were right versus wrong, denial, seclusion, and perception versus reality. Teaching around this text will show children how society works and how people vilify the convicted so that others will have low opinions of them. The book is written is a different way, script-like. This ensures more attention expressed in the students. The themes and ideas in this book make it a great selection to teach to adolescent students. This book grabs attention on page one. The script-like form of writing is somewhat frustrating but does numb after some time of reading the book. It is a bit hard to understand; there's no chronological order. The book fades from present to past to predicted future. All in all, the book is a great piece. Personally, the script lingo on every page is hard to interpret unless someone has background experience with scripts. The same goes for the settings in court when terms used are found in the text. This book was challenging to read but worth the effort.more
Through the story "Monster", Myers writes about the trial and thoughts of a 16-year-old boy who goes by Steve. He keeps the reader interested through a first person, film script type writing. This can seem a bit confusing at first when trying to keep all the people separated in the courtroom. Through Steve's "movie script", the reader finds Steve in prison and on trial for the murder of an older man. This realistic story keeps the reader constantly wondering, "Did he do it?...Will the jury believe he did it?" Steve uses making movies to get through this difficult time. The audience finds that in the end Steve finds his passion which keeps him living above the influence around him. This is a quick-read that any age group will enjoy. Favorite quote: "Think about all the tomorrow's of your life."more
"Monster" is a book about a 16 year old boy named Steve who is on trial for felony murder. I think this book is a very good read for people of any age. The book is about his trial and his time in jail during the trial. He writes journals throughout the story and the book is actually written as a play. This book was very interesting to me, once I picked it up, I literally could not put it back down. Through the whole story I was dying to know whether he was found guilty or not. This book could be used in a classroom to explain to students how the justice system works. The author does a great job of depicting the reality of court. The students could also be assigned roles and they could act out their own court case after reading this book. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone to read. It was very interesting and also a quick and easy read.more
"Monster" is a very interesting book about a boy named Steve Harmon who is on trial for murder. He is writing about his life and his life through his trial process. This book shows his thoughts and feelings towards his time in jail. As he waits for his trial to end, he fears for his future. The emotions of this book are very strong and makes a strong connection to the reader. This book can be a fun book to learn about. Students could really get involved and act out different scenes from the book. For example, a teacher could divide the classroom up in different groups and assign different scenes of the book for each group to act out. The students could learn not only from their teacher but from other classmates as well. The book had many scenes that had an emotional toll on me. When reading the book, I tried to picture myself in his situation and I realized that what he was going through did not seem real. I enjoyed the book. I thought his journals were very deep and personal which made me want to keep reading. I would recommend this book if you are looking for a quick and easy read.more
Monster is a story about a young teenage, Steve, who is on trial for a murder. This story is wrote from Steve's point of view and he writes it stage play fashion. During the trial Steve take the reader back in forth between the past and the present to better help them understand his life. He is labeled as a monster by the District Attorney because of the crime that she claims he help James King commit. I think that was an easy read and would work great for teaching to a class. I think that a class could actually act out each scene as it is already laid out in a stage play format. I think this book would also be a great read for teaching students about peer pressure and some of the things that follow it. This book could also be use to show them how a justice system work. I think that after reading the book it would be a great idea to talk to the student about what could have happened if the trial had a different outcome.Although this book was an easy book to read, it would not have been a book that I would have chosen on my own to read. I do not really like reading books that are set up this way. It also does not fall in to the genre of books that I enjoy reading. There were part in the book that i enjoyed reading. I enjoyed the fact that it was like trip into Steve's on personal thoughts. I enjoyed the feeling that the author showed through his characters. Whiling reading the book the entire time I was hoping that the jury was find Steve not guilty and allow his a second chance at life.more
"Monster" by Walter Dean Myers is a book about a teenage boy in Manhattan on trial for the murder of a man during a robbery. During this book Steve Harmon is writing down his feelings during the trial. The book is written as a play so we as the readers can see Steve's version of what happen the day of the murder. I believe that this book would be a good book for teachers to have teenagers read and then pick a scene to act out. The way the book is already broken up into small scenes it would be very interesting for the class to split up into small groups and each pick a scene to act out to tell the story as a class. I believe that is technique of discussing the book would make it fun and interesting to the kids reading the book. I also think the theme of this book is very good for teenagers to read because it has a good moral story. Especially if you are a teacher in an area where gangs are present it is a good way to get a clear message to the kids who might be making wrong choices. I very much enjoyed this book. It was an easy read but very interesting. I liked that we were able to read his thoughts as he was going through the trial so we as the readers could understand how he really felt. On the other side of it I did like how the prosecutor, Mrs. Petrocelli, did not ever let down. She was going to make sure that Harmon, King, and Bobo did not get away with anything they were not guilty of. I believe that this book is a good book to teach on because it has a lot of life lessons and is very entertaining at the same time.more
“Monster” by Walter Dean Myers is about sixteen years old Steve Harmon, who is on trial for murder. Steve is allegedly guilty for being the lookout of a store robbery that turned into a murder. To help him cope with prison, Steve writes down the trial in a notebook like a writer would a screen play. He aspires to be a director one day. This scripted story describes Steve’s struggle with himself. The prosecutor calls him a monster and Steve begins to think that he may be one. Walter Dean Myers decides to write this book in the form of a screen play. This is a very unique way to write a book, this helps the students experience diversity in literature. Diversity of genre is key to finding an interest in literature. This book is also very relatable to the students because Steve is around their age group. Steve’s story can demonstrate what can happen when people get mixed up with the wrong type of people. It also describes what peer pressure can cause. Teens are very susceptible to peer pressure; Steve’s story can open their eyes to the consequences of it.This book is not something I would usually read. If I had not been assigned the book I do not think I would have ever read it, but once I started I became quite interested in the emotional roller coaster of Steve’s story. The first line of the book really got to me. As soon as I read that line I was hooked. The idea of a sixteen year old boy sitting in jail every night listening to people fight and having to hide his emotions from the rest of the cell mates devastated me. I was on his side from the beginning. His ideas and thoughts throughout the story had me almost screaming how could they not think he was innocent! This young man was caused to see and hear things that no sixteen years old should. The outcome was a real surprise to me, but I was extremely pleased with it. The mystery of this story kept me turning pages. I would recommend this book to any future colleague or student.more
This book is about a young African American, Steve Harmon, who is involved in a murder trial. He is claiming his innocence whereas the prosecutor is demanding that he is guilty. Throughout the course of the book, Steve Harmon thinks back to what really happened during this event. He compiles his memories in to a movie script.I believe that there are key points in this book that can be used for teaching strategies. For example, having students fill out an anticipation guide or making predictions abut the text will help get students involved and excited about reading this book. Also, after reading this book, a class can participate in their own "trial". I believe this will engage students to really try to grasp the different terms and concepts of what happens in a court room. I enjoyed reading this book. I did not know what to expect when I first started reading, but once I knew a little more about Steve Harmon, I was already on his side. The prosecutor was really starting to get under my skin. I was trying to figure out who was telling the truth and who was lying the entire time I was reading this book. At the end of the story, I did not understand why O'Brien acted like she was not happy with the outcome of the trial. It almost seemed as if there needed to be another book to tell why she did that. Overall, I found this to be a good read.more
The book "Monster" goes through the experience of a sixteen year old boy who is put on trial for a murder that occurred in a convenient store. He tells his story through a movie script because he is a part of the filming club in his school, and he uses this skill to cope with his emotions throughout the trial. His family hires a lawyer, Mrs. O'Brien who is very helpful throughout the trial and gives Steve, the boy, good tips on how they are going to win. At the end of the book, Steve is proven to be innocent by a grand jury and gets to walk free of charges. I think this book would be a great one to teach in a classroom for several reasons. First, the boy's age is relatable to the students who would be reading the text. He is sixteen and several times throughout the story he explains that he has his whole life ahead of him and he is too young to spend the rest of his life in a jail cell. I think this would be of good insight to the students, seeing as though most of them would not want to waste their life. It puts themselves in the narrator's shoes. Also, it teaches about our judicial system. The experience Steve goes through (and writes about) shows how a courtroom, lawyers, and a judge function and how our judicial system in the United States works. Students could make notable comments and write a reflection on whether they agree with the system or not. I honestly enjoyed this book very much. Once I started, it was very hard to put down because I wanted to see what was going to happen next. The emotion of the young boy on trial was very real causing feelings in myself to come out about the situation. I was rooting for his innocence all along because he seemed to come from a great family and I believed him to be telling the truth. It was a great novel about our judicial system as well. The closing arguments of the lawyers were extremely well written and was something you could picture taking place in a courtroom or on a scene of Law and Order. I thought the way the book was written was also unique. The narrator writes this experience as a movie script, giving the reader a very clear image on how the scene looked. I loved the raw emotion that he included on the random 'notes' pages that were somewhat like a diary for him. Overall a great read and I recommend it to anyone!more
This novel is told from the first person perspective of Steve Harmon, a young man on trail for murder. There are times when Steve speaks his thoughts giving a summary of what he is going through. The majority of the scenes are told through a screenplay that Steve writes as he goes through his trial. It is his way of keeping himself from going crazy. The screenplay technique is a unique way of experiencing what Steve goes through. Instead of the reader reading about the trial in standard novel form, the trial is shown through a script. The story is mostly written in the first person, with the inserted screenplay written by the overall narrator, Steve.more
This book is about a boy Steve who is in jail and on trial for a crime. In order to cope with his situation he begins making a movie in his head. This movie helps to understand the way his trail is going. This book also shows how the judicial system works and what it is like for people in jail. This book shows how friends have a reflection on yourself and how important it is to choose friends correctly. Since this book shows how the judicial system works, I think it is a good idea to do a reenactment of the trail in the book after you have read it. All of the children could have a part. This is a good way to help them understand the book a little more because at times it can be hard to follow. I really did not enjoy this book. It was hard for me to stay interested in it, it is hard to relate to the characters in this book.It was also hard to decided if Steve was innocent or not and at the end of the book I am still not sure if he is innocent or not. Also Switching from person to person and place to place it was hard to follow sometimes.more
Monster is a book that would work well for adolescents. It tells the story of the trial of 16 year old Steve Harmon for felony murder. The book is written from Steve's POV as a movie script. Steve has a passion for film making and tries to cope with his trial by documenting it in this manner. The book leaves the reader questioning a bit and has very thin character development.more
Monster tells the story of Steve Harmon, a man accused of taking part in a convenience store robbery. It chronicles the trial for this crime. Through the story, various witnesses are called and Steve's relationship with each is examined. The story is told through a movie script Steve writes as well as his journal entries.A major theme in the novel is friend choice. Steve's situation comes mainly from his association with unsavory characters. This could lead to some good writing exercises for the classroom. The journal entries also provide some insight into how Steve is feeling during his ordeal. This alternate source of info can lead to some good discussions.Overall, I didn't really enjoy the book. One of the concepts this book tries to portray is how life is in prison. It only halfway developed this concept. Aside from that, the book was fairly short. This is not a bad thing for a book used in a classroom. Steve's reaction at the ending felt kind of forced. It seemed like the author just threw in Steve's search for himself at the end.more
Monster is about a young boy, Steve Harmon, who is on trial for being the “lookout” to a robbery gone wrong. Because he is finding it hard to get used to living in jail, he channels his thoughts and turns the events that happen to him into a movie by writing the script in his notebook. Although Steve insists he is innocent and was not even at the scene of the crime, the others convicted said that not only was he there, he was an accomplice. Although the story is told from Steve’s point of view, he records only the truth. Throughout the book, it is the reader’s job to determine his innocence or his guilt based off the words of Steve, his defendant, the opposition, and the other felons. In a classroom, this book could be read alongside a unit on the judicial system and the proceedings of a court trial. Social studies could easily be tied into this by studying the beginning of the judicial system, how it has changed through time, and why it is the way it is. This book could also be used for a unit on personal studies on different cultures and neighborhoods right here in the United States and how where you grow up and the choices you make influence every aspect of your life. This book has a theme of good and bad choices and truth and lies. As students read this book, they could discuss what good choices were made, what bad choices were made, and if they think Steve was innocent or guilty and how they can use evidence as support. To be completely honest, I wasn’t a big fan of this story. I thought it was interesting how it was written as a script and contained flashbacks from Steve’s life, but it was somewhat boring. I did not know enough about Steve or who he was to really care what his fate was as awful as that may sound. I felt no personal connection with Steve that I usually find with the main character in a story. I also didn’t like not knowing whether he was innocent or guilty. I know that was the intention of the author to have to reader find their own conclusion, but it was almost impossible to tell. I felt that the author didn’t even know whether he was innocent or guilty. There were also no good characters in this story. I didn’t like reading about Bobo and Osvaldo who didn’t seem to have souls. I probably wouldn’t use this book in my classroom. It was somewhat confusing at times and I’m not sure it would captivate an entire room of middle schoolers. There were also some very mature themes such as homosexual rape.more
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Reviews

It's a great book that has a wonderful plot to it you'll fall in love with the book after you read it
more
very good book more
great. must readmore
I loved this audiobook with the film script format! The story is very 12 Angry Men from the perspective of the accused Teen. more
I liked the journal and film script way of telling the story. It was so interesting to get inside the head of a sixteen-year-old boy on trial for murder with uncertain ties to the event. Not as gritty as one might think. Most of the harsh prison life details are left out, with only references to actions, rather than graphic descriptions.more
Solid, popular, boy-centered book. Never go wrong with Walter Dean Myersmore
I surprisingly liked this book. I thought I wouldn't based on the style the story is presented (it's written in both script format and as a journal entry), but once I got used to the jarring quality of the script, I found it made for a quick read.

The subject is obviously a tough one, but I think it's well presented and does a fantastic job of showcasing truth and reality of life.

I found the content fascinating and while some of the character's are questionable (i'm still unsure of whether Steve was actually in the drugstore...he kept mentioning he went in for mints...) the overall message of good over evil and the justice system prevailing still managed to come across.

It would have been an entirely different book and commentary if the ending hadn't happened the way it did.more
I wanted to like this better, but there just wasn't much depth to it. I thought the writing style - being written as a screenplay - would be distracting, but it was enjoyable.more
First person narrative of a kid going through a trial that might end in a life sentence. He writes his experiences down in a notebook as a film script and director's notes. Inventive format, really compellingly blunt narrative.more
Monster is the story of Steve Harmon, a young man from the Harlem neighborhood who is facing a charge of felony murder. The book opens with the gripping image of Steve crying quietly in his cell while a fellow prisoner is being beaten and raped. Steve tells his story through a series of journal entries and a move script. The script is especially used for Steve to process the situation that he is going through. In his journal entries and film sequences, Steve ponders his own perceived innocence, shares scenes from life in the prison, and recounts events that led to his accusation. The journal entries as well as the interwoven court scenes are well crafted. However, the close reader notices the discrepancies between Steve's testimony in court and the facts that he relates in his journal. This might lead the reader to pass a "guilty" verdict on Steve Harmon. However, throughout the story, the author has created so much ambiguity and nuance in the terms "guilty" and "innocent', that it is hard to make a resolute judgement. Prisoners speak of their crimes as "mistakes", and out of delusion believe themselves to be innocent. Others quibble about "truth", and feel that telling their own version of the story is acceptable in light of the true horrors of life in prison. These conversations take place right before Steve's testimony in court, leaving readers wondering what the truth really is. This question haunts the reader even after the story is over, in the same way that Steve is ever after haunted by his identity as a "monster".I liked this book because of the mystery that it maintains, and the question marks that it leaves you with. I think that this book speaks to young people because it deals with decision-making, acquaintance choices, helplessness, and identity crises.The book gives plenty of room for teachers to discuss the difference between perception and actual truth with their students. This would be a great book to teach to a classroom full of tough customers, and it is short enough and an easy enough read to assign to young people with the expectation that they read it on their own.more
This is a great book. The story is about boy named Steve Harmon. Steve is a young, black, terrified teenager. Steve is living in New York state with his mother, father and little brother. He is in trial for a murder. During this trial, Steve uses past and present timing to get the reader involved in the text. This fast-moving book was written like a movie script. There is a lot of drama in the book also. This book kept my attention throughout the whole story. The guessing and wondering keeps you on the edge of your seat. I have a concern about this book. Such as, what grade level should a teacher give this type of book to her students to read for a discussion? We need to make sure our classroom children are ready for books like this one. I liked how it gave a lot of different examples of how things are brought up in the court room. Showing differently aged children how the court works with different examples, like the book Monster, might keep the classroom from doing bad things to go to jail. I liked this book a lot. It is a very detailed book, and it is great for teenagers to see what goes on in the court room. I think every student around the age of nine should have to read this book as he or she is approaching the peer pressure years of a teenager. I have seen many of my friends have to go to court for different reasons and getting a feel for the way they ask questions can be quite scary. This book could be a guide to being honest and wanting to do the correct things in life. I would recommend this book to any child that wanted a quick, fun read.more
Monster is about a young teenage boy, Steve, who is accused of committing a crime at a drug store. One of his acquaintances, Bobo, places him at the scene of the crime, telling the jury that he was a part of the illegal act. Now it is up to the lawers and jury to decide the fate of this young man. The book is written in a script because after all was said and done, Steve made his experience into a movie. Teaching this book to a class would be great. It relates to so many kids who are living in dangerous areas and who sometimes associate with the wrong people. One good theme about this book that a teacher could point out to his/her students is that one must be wise in choosing who the associate with. Steve was a harmless guy, but since he chose to talk to the neighborhood criminals, they threw him under the bus and accused him of murder. Another good point about this book is that no matter what type of situation one is in, it is always important to always believe in yourself. Do not let someone wrongly accuse you of something you know you did not do. I actually liked this book. It was very easy to read and kept you interested in what was going to happen next. I cannot say that I can relate to this young boy, but I can only imagine that this was the worst experience of his life. My heart goes out to those who are wrongly accused of a crime. I know for a fact that I do not like people blaming me for something that I know I did not do. Growing up, I was brought up in a good town and great school and it just breaks my heart to think that crime, in some cities, happens daily and that it has no effect on some of the people.more
Steve Harmon was a simple boy just trying to make it through school. He saw life as a movie waiting to be produced and directed. A turn of events happen that Steve's life forever. He is charged with murder. Behind bars he is, waiting for his trail. Did he really help with a murder? Is he really a monster? Themes in "Monster" revolved around crime and actual life. Some of the themes were right versus wrong, denial, seclusion, and perception versus reality. Teaching around this text will show children how society works and how people vilify the convicted so that others will have low opinions of them. The book is written is a different way, script-like. This ensures more attention expressed in the students. The themes and ideas in this book make it a great selection to teach to adolescent students. This book grabs attention on page one. The script-like form of writing is somewhat frustrating but does numb after some time of reading the book. It is a bit hard to understand; there's no chronological order. The book fades from present to past to predicted future. All in all, the book is a great piece. Personally, the script lingo on every page is hard to interpret unless someone has background experience with scripts. The same goes for the settings in court when terms used are found in the text. This book was challenging to read but worth the effort.more
Through the story "Monster", Myers writes about the trial and thoughts of a 16-year-old boy who goes by Steve. He keeps the reader interested through a first person, film script type writing. This can seem a bit confusing at first when trying to keep all the people separated in the courtroom. Through Steve's "movie script", the reader finds Steve in prison and on trial for the murder of an older man. This realistic story keeps the reader constantly wondering, "Did he do it?...Will the jury believe he did it?" Steve uses making movies to get through this difficult time. The audience finds that in the end Steve finds his passion which keeps him living above the influence around him. This is a quick-read that any age group will enjoy. Favorite quote: "Think about all the tomorrow's of your life."more
"Monster" is a book about a 16 year old boy named Steve who is on trial for felony murder. I think this book is a very good read for people of any age. The book is about his trial and his time in jail during the trial. He writes journals throughout the story and the book is actually written as a play. This book was very interesting to me, once I picked it up, I literally could not put it back down. Through the whole story I was dying to know whether he was found guilty or not. This book could be used in a classroom to explain to students how the justice system works. The author does a great job of depicting the reality of court. The students could also be assigned roles and they could act out their own court case after reading this book. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone to read. It was very interesting and also a quick and easy read.more
"Monster" is a very interesting book about a boy named Steve Harmon who is on trial for murder. He is writing about his life and his life through his trial process. This book shows his thoughts and feelings towards his time in jail. As he waits for his trial to end, he fears for his future. The emotions of this book are very strong and makes a strong connection to the reader. This book can be a fun book to learn about. Students could really get involved and act out different scenes from the book. For example, a teacher could divide the classroom up in different groups and assign different scenes of the book for each group to act out. The students could learn not only from their teacher but from other classmates as well. The book had many scenes that had an emotional toll on me. When reading the book, I tried to picture myself in his situation and I realized that what he was going through did not seem real. I enjoyed the book. I thought his journals were very deep and personal which made me want to keep reading. I would recommend this book if you are looking for a quick and easy read.more
Monster is a story about a young teenage, Steve, who is on trial for a murder. This story is wrote from Steve's point of view and he writes it stage play fashion. During the trial Steve take the reader back in forth between the past and the present to better help them understand his life. He is labeled as a monster by the District Attorney because of the crime that she claims he help James King commit. I think that was an easy read and would work great for teaching to a class. I think that a class could actually act out each scene as it is already laid out in a stage play format. I think this book would also be a great read for teaching students about peer pressure and some of the things that follow it. This book could also be use to show them how a justice system work. I think that after reading the book it would be a great idea to talk to the student about what could have happened if the trial had a different outcome.Although this book was an easy book to read, it would not have been a book that I would have chosen on my own to read. I do not really like reading books that are set up this way. It also does not fall in to the genre of books that I enjoy reading. There were part in the book that i enjoyed reading. I enjoyed the fact that it was like trip into Steve's on personal thoughts. I enjoyed the feeling that the author showed through his characters. Whiling reading the book the entire time I was hoping that the jury was find Steve not guilty and allow his a second chance at life.more
"Monster" by Walter Dean Myers is a book about a teenage boy in Manhattan on trial for the murder of a man during a robbery. During this book Steve Harmon is writing down his feelings during the trial. The book is written as a play so we as the readers can see Steve's version of what happen the day of the murder. I believe that this book would be a good book for teachers to have teenagers read and then pick a scene to act out. The way the book is already broken up into small scenes it would be very interesting for the class to split up into small groups and each pick a scene to act out to tell the story as a class. I believe that is technique of discussing the book would make it fun and interesting to the kids reading the book. I also think the theme of this book is very good for teenagers to read because it has a good moral story. Especially if you are a teacher in an area where gangs are present it is a good way to get a clear message to the kids who might be making wrong choices. I very much enjoyed this book. It was an easy read but very interesting. I liked that we were able to read his thoughts as he was going through the trial so we as the readers could understand how he really felt. On the other side of it I did like how the prosecutor, Mrs. Petrocelli, did not ever let down. She was going to make sure that Harmon, King, and Bobo did not get away with anything they were not guilty of. I believe that this book is a good book to teach on because it has a lot of life lessons and is very entertaining at the same time.more
“Monster” by Walter Dean Myers is about sixteen years old Steve Harmon, who is on trial for murder. Steve is allegedly guilty for being the lookout of a store robbery that turned into a murder. To help him cope with prison, Steve writes down the trial in a notebook like a writer would a screen play. He aspires to be a director one day. This scripted story describes Steve’s struggle with himself. The prosecutor calls him a monster and Steve begins to think that he may be one. Walter Dean Myers decides to write this book in the form of a screen play. This is a very unique way to write a book, this helps the students experience diversity in literature. Diversity of genre is key to finding an interest in literature. This book is also very relatable to the students because Steve is around their age group. Steve’s story can demonstrate what can happen when people get mixed up with the wrong type of people. It also describes what peer pressure can cause. Teens are very susceptible to peer pressure; Steve’s story can open their eyes to the consequences of it.This book is not something I would usually read. If I had not been assigned the book I do not think I would have ever read it, but once I started I became quite interested in the emotional roller coaster of Steve’s story. The first line of the book really got to me. As soon as I read that line I was hooked. The idea of a sixteen year old boy sitting in jail every night listening to people fight and having to hide his emotions from the rest of the cell mates devastated me. I was on his side from the beginning. His ideas and thoughts throughout the story had me almost screaming how could they not think he was innocent! This young man was caused to see and hear things that no sixteen years old should. The outcome was a real surprise to me, but I was extremely pleased with it. The mystery of this story kept me turning pages. I would recommend this book to any future colleague or student.more
This book is about a young African American, Steve Harmon, who is involved in a murder trial. He is claiming his innocence whereas the prosecutor is demanding that he is guilty. Throughout the course of the book, Steve Harmon thinks back to what really happened during this event. He compiles his memories in to a movie script.I believe that there are key points in this book that can be used for teaching strategies. For example, having students fill out an anticipation guide or making predictions abut the text will help get students involved and excited about reading this book. Also, after reading this book, a class can participate in their own "trial". I believe this will engage students to really try to grasp the different terms and concepts of what happens in a court room. I enjoyed reading this book. I did not know what to expect when I first started reading, but once I knew a little more about Steve Harmon, I was already on his side. The prosecutor was really starting to get under my skin. I was trying to figure out who was telling the truth and who was lying the entire time I was reading this book. At the end of the story, I did not understand why O'Brien acted like she was not happy with the outcome of the trial. It almost seemed as if there needed to be another book to tell why she did that. Overall, I found this to be a good read.more
The book "Monster" goes through the experience of a sixteen year old boy who is put on trial for a murder that occurred in a convenient store. He tells his story through a movie script because he is a part of the filming club in his school, and he uses this skill to cope with his emotions throughout the trial. His family hires a lawyer, Mrs. O'Brien who is very helpful throughout the trial and gives Steve, the boy, good tips on how they are going to win. At the end of the book, Steve is proven to be innocent by a grand jury and gets to walk free of charges. I think this book would be a great one to teach in a classroom for several reasons. First, the boy's age is relatable to the students who would be reading the text. He is sixteen and several times throughout the story he explains that he has his whole life ahead of him and he is too young to spend the rest of his life in a jail cell. I think this would be of good insight to the students, seeing as though most of them would not want to waste their life. It puts themselves in the narrator's shoes. Also, it teaches about our judicial system. The experience Steve goes through (and writes about) shows how a courtroom, lawyers, and a judge function and how our judicial system in the United States works. Students could make notable comments and write a reflection on whether they agree with the system or not. I honestly enjoyed this book very much. Once I started, it was very hard to put down because I wanted to see what was going to happen next. The emotion of the young boy on trial was very real causing feelings in myself to come out about the situation. I was rooting for his innocence all along because he seemed to come from a great family and I believed him to be telling the truth. It was a great novel about our judicial system as well. The closing arguments of the lawyers were extremely well written and was something you could picture taking place in a courtroom or on a scene of Law and Order. I thought the way the book was written was also unique. The narrator writes this experience as a movie script, giving the reader a very clear image on how the scene looked. I loved the raw emotion that he included on the random 'notes' pages that were somewhat like a diary for him. Overall a great read and I recommend it to anyone!more
This novel is told from the first person perspective of Steve Harmon, a young man on trail for murder. There are times when Steve speaks his thoughts giving a summary of what he is going through. The majority of the scenes are told through a screenplay that Steve writes as he goes through his trial. It is his way of keeping himself from going crazy. The screenplay technique is a unique way of experiencing what Steve goes through. Instead of the reader reading about the trial in standard novel form, the trial is shown through a script. The story is mostly written in the first person, with the inserted screenplay written by the overall narrator, Steve.more
This book is about a boy Steve who is in jail and on trial for a crime. In order to cope with his situation he begins making a movie in his head. This movie helps to understand the way his trail is going. This book also shows how the judicial system works and what it is like for people in jail. This book shows how friends have a reflection on yourself and how important it is to choose friends correctly. Since this book shows how the judicial system works, I think it is a good idea to do a reenactment of the trail in the book after you have read it. All of the children could have a part. This is a good way to help them understand the book a little more because at times it can be hard to follow. I really did not enjoy this book. It was hard for me to stay interested in it, it is hard to relate to the characters in this book.It was also hard to decided if Steve was innocent or not and at the end of the book I am still not sure if he is innocent or not. Also Switching from person to person and place to place it was hard to follow sometimes.more
Monster is a book that would work well for adolescents. It tells the story of the trial of 16 year old Steve Harmon for felony murder. The book is written from Steve's POV as a movie script. Steve has a passion for film making and tries to cope with his trial by documenting it in this manner. The book leaves the reader questioning a bit and has very thin character development.more
Monster tells the story of Steve Harmon, a man accused of taking part in a convenience store robbery. It chronicles the trial for this crime. Through the story, various witnesses are called and Steve's relationship with each is examined. The story is told through a movie script Steve writes as well as his journal entries.A major theme in the novel is friend choice. Steve's situation comes mainly from his association with unsavory characters. This could lead to some good writing exercises for the classroom. The journal entries also provide some insight into how Steve is feeling during his ordeal. This alternate source of info can lead to some good discussions.Overall, I didn't really enjoy the book. One of the concepts this book tries to portray is how life is in prison. It only halfway developed this concept. Aside from that, the book was fairly short. This is not a bad thing for a book used in a classroom. Steve's reaction at the ending felt kind of forced. It seemed like the author just threw in Steve's search for himself at the end.more
Monster is about a young boy, Steve Harmon, who is on trial for being the “lookout” to a robbery gone wrong. Because he is finding it hard to get used to living in jail, he channels his thoughts and turns the events that happen to him into a movie by writing the script in his notebook. Although Steve insists he is innocent and was not even at the scene of the crime, the others convicted said that not only was he there, he was an accomplice. Although the story is told from Steve’s point of view, he records only the truth. Throughout the book, it is the reader’s job to determine his innocence or his guilt based off the words of Steve, his defendant, the opposition, and the other felons. In a classroom, this book could be read alongside a unit on the judicial system and the proceedings of a court trial. Social studies could easily be tied into this by studying the beginning of the judicial system, how it has changed through time, and why it is the way it is. This book could also be used for a unit on personal studies on different cultures and neighborhoods right here in the United States and how where you grow up and the choices you make influence every aspect of your life. This book has a theme of good and bad choices and truth and lies. As students read this book, they could discuss what good choices were made, what bad choices were made, and if they think Steve was innocent or guilty and how they can use evidence as support. To be completely honest, I wasn’t a big fan of this story. I thought it was interesting how it was written as a script and contained flashbacks from Steve’s life, but it was somewhat boring. I did not know enough about Steve or who he was to really care what his fate was as awful as that may sound. I felt no personal connection with Steve that I usually find with the main character in a story. I also didn’t like not knowing whether he was innocent or guilty. I know that was the intention of the author to have to reader find their own conclusion, but it was almost impossible to tell. I felt that the author didn’t even know whether he was innocent or guilty. There were also no good characters in this story. I didn’t like reading about Bobo and Osvaldo who didn’t seem to have souls. I probably wouldn’t use this book in my classroom. It was somewhat confusing at times and I’m not sure it would captivate an entire room of middle schoolers. There were also some very mature themes such as homosexual rape.more
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