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From the Publisher

“A look at the difficulties of sustaining childhood bonds, it’s also a satisfying meditation on how nourishment for the body can replenish the soul.”
People

 

A novel that combines the moving story of a friendship told in letters with more than 80 delicious recipes, The Recipe Club by Andrea Israel (Taking Tea) and Nancy Garfinkel (The Wine Lover’s Guide to Wine Country) is a wonderful literary banquet. A celebration of female bonding and excellent cooking—with scrumptious dishes developed by New York Times food columnist Melissa Clark—The Recipe Club will satisfy readers who previously devoured The Friday Night Knitting Club, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society, and The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061994388
List price: $10.99
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