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Once again the incomparable New York Times bestselling master of suspense, Elizabeth Peters, brings an exotic world of adventure, intrigue, and danger to vivid life, in a tale as exciting, mysterious, and powerful as ancient Egypt.

A unique treasure obtained by unscrupulous means, the small gold statuette of an unidentified Egyptian king is a priceless relic from a bygone era. But more than history surrounds the remarkable artifact—for it is said that early death will come to anyone who possesses it.

Enjoying a world finally at peace, the Emersons have returned to the Valley of the Kings in 1922. With the lengthy ban on their archaeological activities lifted, Amelia Peabody and her family look forward to delving once more into the age-old mysteries buried in Egypt's ever-shifting sands. But a widow's strange story—and even stranger request—is about to plunge them into a storm of secrets, treachery, superstition . . . and murder.

The woman, a well-known author, has come bearing an ill-gotten treasure—a golden likeness of a forgotten king—which she claims is cursed. Already, she insists, it has taken the life of her husband, and unless it is returned to the tomb from which it was stolen, more people will die.

Intrigued by the mystery, Amelia and her clan resolve to uncover the secrets of the statue's origins, setting off on a trail that twists and turns in directions they never anticipated—and, perhaps, toward an old nemesis with unscrupulous new designs. But each step toward the truth seems to reveal another peril, suggesting to the intrepid Amelia that the curse is more than mere superstition. And its next victim might well be her irascible husband, Radcliffe, their beloved son, Ramses, his lovely wife, Nefret ... or Amelia Peabody herself.

A novel filled with riveting suspense, pulse-pounding action, and the vibrant life of a fascinating place and time, The Serpent on the Crown is the jewel in the crown of a grand master, the remarkable Elizabeth Peters.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061807251
List price: $9.99
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Gold statue, purported to be cursed, makes for trouble, as Ramses and David chase a brother and sister and Amelia is very badly hurt. Entertaining, though the kids (Ramses') are irritating.more
Wonderful as ever - I love Amelia!more
This installment of the Amelia Peabody series brings us back into chronological order. The Emeraons are approached by a wealthy widow who is also a famous novelist. She appeals to them to accept a stunning golden statue which was bequeathed to her by her husband, and which she claims is cursed. She claims to believe that only Emerson can safely keep it, as his talents for escaping all kinds of danger and for excorcising evil spirits are well-known.Soon, the Emersons are thrust into the midst of a series of mysterious events involving dead bodies and black afrits. As they work to unravel the puzzle of who is behind these mysterious occurences, they never flinch from what may be the greatest danger they've ever faced.Of course I loved this! It was one of the most suspenseful in the series.more
Its now 1921 and the extended Emerson-Peabody clan is once again excavating in Egypt. A woman gives Emerson a small golden statute because she is concerned that it is cursed, she subsequently disappears in strange circumstances. The usual shenanigans ensue and as family is inexorably drawn into investigating the disappearance. Amelia is on fine form, 'I instructed the driver of our hired carriage not to whip up the horses. We do not permit cruelty to animals. Besides, rapid motion raises a cloud of dust and I was wearing my second-best hat.' Superb.more
A woman arrives in Cairo and gives Emerson a very expensive Egyptian artifact, asking him to remove the curse from it. The serpent on the artifact is missing, and the source of its find is a great mystery. The family of the woman are a bit of a puzzle as well and there are a number of new faces that seem to appear for odd reasons, causing the Luxor residence to build a guardhouse with a guard. The antics of the grandchildren play favorably in the story with many new relationships being built. Ramses and Emerson stage an exorcism of an afrit in trying to get rid of the curse, but is there a real afrit who has kidnapped the woman who owns the artifact? The family team does it again in ferreting out the many criminals and their motivations, but the fun comes from the finding of the serpent that goes in the crown of the artifact.more
Even as she grows older, Amelia Peabody Emerson is unstoppable. Being presented with a valuable statuette which supposedly curses whoever is in possession of it, causes Emerson to try to trace its origin and its legal owner. A number of people are vying to buy the statuette, including Cyrus. The previous owner is murdered and this gives Amelia and Emerson ample opportunity to exercise their detective skills, the former ultimately revealing the culprit and the latter the statuette's origin.more
I absolutely love this series. I'd been letting the latest books pile up in my TBR pile for a while--kind of like... er, well, actually, it's exactly like hoarding treasure. Now I only have one left to be caught up.In this 17th book in the series, the Emerson clan is back in Egypt after WWI: Emerson, Amelia, Ramses, Nefret, and their twins: David John and Carla.Shortly after their arrival, a famous author of sensational novels arrives with a gold statue. She begs Emerson to take the statue and protect her from the curse she claims killed her husband. She seems genuinely frightened, but they're suspicious that it might just be a publicity stunt. Regardless of the existence of a curse or actual danger to the woman, the statue is genuine, and for the Emersons, the questions of where the statue came from--a lost tomb?!--is far more compelling.Things become complicated, of course, starting with the widow's stepchildren barging into the Emersons' home demanding the return of the statue at gunpoint. There are several sightings of a black-robed "demon," prompting one of Emerson's famous exorcisms; the appearance of Emerson's half-brother Sethos, always suspicious when there's treasure around; kidnapping, disappearances, and murder.As usual, the family adventure is just as important as the mystery--watching Peabody and Emerson growing older and Ramses and Nefret with the twins is like visiting with old friends.Also as usual, the characters are their distinct selves--Amelia's not-completely-reliable narrator is a delight, and the sections from Ramses's point of view demonstrates his character well. But because their characters are so vivid, you really have to like the characters to enjoy the books.more
Enjoying a busy period of excavation in 1921, the Emersons learn of a mysterious death that has been attributed to a curse, a situation that enables Amelia and her family to enter the banned Valley of the Kings in order to return a stolen statue.more
A very good addition to the Amelia Peabody mysteries. Recent books have covered the adventures of her son Ramses or backed up to cover some of the "missing years" but this one extends the story through 1922 - which, if you know something about Egypt, you might know was the eve of a very important event in Egyptology...more
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Reviews

Gold statue, purported to be cursed, makes for trouble, as Ramses and David chase a brother and sister and Amelia is very badly hurt. Entertaining, though the kids (Ramses') are irritating.more
Wonderful as ever - I love Amelia!more
This installment of the Amelia Peabody series brings us back into chronological order. The Emeraons are approached by a wealthy widow who is also a famous novelist. She appeals to them to accept a stunning golden statue which was bequeathed to her by her husband, and which she claims is cursed. She claims to believe that only Emerson can safely keep it, as his talents for escaping all kinds of danger and for excorcising evil spirits are well-known.Soon, the Emersons are thrust into the midst of a series of mysterious events involving dead bodies and black afrits. As they work to unravel the puzzle of who is behind these mysterious occurences, they never flinch from what may be the greatest danger they've ever faced.Of course I loved this! It was one of the most suspenseful in the series.more
Its now 1921 and the extended Emerson-Peabody clan is once again excavating in Egypt. A woman gives Emerson a small golden statute because she is concerned that it is cursed, she subsequently disappears in strange circumstances. The usual shenanigans ensue and as family is inexorably drawn into investigating the disappearance. Amelia is on fine form, 'I instructed the driver of our hired carriage not to whip up the horses. We do not permit cruelty to animals. Besides, rapid motion raises a cloud of dust and I was wearing my second-best hat.' Superb.more
A woman arrives in Cairo and gives Emerson a very expensive Egyptian artifact, asking him to remove the curse from it. The serpent on the artifact is missing, and the source of its find is a great mystery. The family of the woman are a bit of a puzzle as well and there are a number of new faces that seem to appear for odd reasons, causing the Luxor residence to build a guardhouse with a guard. The antics of the grandchildren play favorably in the story with many new relationships being built. Ramses and Emerson stage an exorcism of an afrit in trying to get rid of the curse, but is there a real afrit who has kidnapped the woman who owns the artifact? The family team does it again in ferreting out the many criminals and their motivations, but the fun comes from the finding of the serpent that goes in the crown of the artifact.more
Even as she grows older, Amelia Peabody Emerson is unstoppable. Being presented with a valuable statuette which supposedly curses whoever is in possession of it, causes Emerson to try to trace its origin and its legal owner. A number of people are vying to buy the statuette, including Cyrus. The previous owner is murdered and this gives Amelia and Emerson ample opportunity to exercise their detective skills, the former ultimately revealing the culprit and the latter the statuette's origin.more
I absolutely love this series. I'd been letting the latest books pile up in my TBR pile for a while--kind of like... er, well, actually, it's exactly like hoarding treasure. Now I only have one left to be caught up.In this 17th book in the series, the Emerson clan is back in Egypt after WWI: Emerson, Amelia, Ramses, Nefret, and their twins: David John and Carla.Shortly after their arrival, a famous author of sensational novels arrives with a gold statue. She begs Emerson to take the statue and protect her from the curse she claims killed her husband. She seems genuinely frightened, but they're suspicious that it might just be a publicity stunt. Regardless of the existence of a curse or actual danger to the woman, the statue is genuine, and for the Emersons, the questions of where the statue came from--a lost tomb?!--is far more compelling.Things become complicated, of course, starting with the widow's stepchildren barging into the Emersons' home demanding the return of the statue at gunpoint. There are several sightings of a black-robed "demon," prompting one of Emerson's famous exorcisms; the appearance of Emerson's half-brother Sethos, always suspicious when there's treasure around; kidnapping, disappearances, and murder.As usual, the family adventure is just as important as the mystery--watching Peabody and Emerson growing older and Ramses and Nefret with the twins is like visiting with old friends.Also as usual, the characters are their distinct selves--Amelia's not-completely-reliable narrator is a delight, and the sections from Ramses's point of view demonstrates his character well. But because their characters are so vivid, you really have to like the characters to enjoy the books.more
Enjoying a busy period of excavation in 1921, the Emersons learn of a mysterious death that has been attributed to a curse, a situation that enables Amelia and her family to enter the banned Valley of the Kings in order to return a stolen statue.more
A very good addition to the Amelia Peabody mysteries. Recent books have covered the adventures of her son Ramses or backed up to cover some of the "missing years" but this one extends the story through 1922 - which, if you know something about Egypt, you might know was the eve of a very important event in Egyptology...more
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