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When Siddalee Walker, oldest daughter of Vivi Abbott Walker, Ya-Ya extraordinaire, is interviewed in the New York Times about a hit play she's directed, her mother gets described as a "tap-dancing child abuser." Enraged, Vivi disowns Sidda. Devastated, Sidda begs forgiveness, and postpones her upcoming wedding. All looks bleak until the Ya-Yas step in and convince Vivi to send Sidda a scrapbook of their girlhood mementos, called "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood." As Sidda struggles to analyze her mother, she comes face to face with the tangled beauty of imperfect love, and the fact that forgiveness, more than understanding, is often what the heart longs for.

Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood may call to mind Prince of Tides in its unearthing of family darkness; in its unforgettable heroines and irrepressible humor and female loyalty, it echoes Fannie Flagg's Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe.

Topics: Family, Alcoholism, Mothers, Daughters, American South, American Author, 20th Century, Heartfelt, Coming of Age, Dysfunctional Family, Mothers and Daughters, Made into a Movie, Female Friendship, Female Protagonist, Race Relations, Friendship, Childhood, Marriage, Catholicism, Addiction, Love, Social Class, Cliques, Domestic Abuse, Abuse, New York City, Louisiana, 1950s, 1990s, Domestic, Psychological, Realistic, Funny, Flashbacks, Female Author, and Secrets

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061743368
List price: $9.99
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The things I enjoyed most were the Southern setting, and learning bits and pieces of the strong friendship among the four girls->women throughout the book. Since I've moved several times since high school, I haven't maintained the closeness with my childhood girlfriends like the women in this book did. I liked how the scrapbook told part of the story as well.more
I found this book pretty weird. The child abuse was so lightly dealt with -- and it's still abuse if it only happens once. Physical abuse, even on just one occasion, sticks in your mind. Especially when you're a child and you haven't had that many experiences yet. It's not something to be just... dismissed and so easily forgiven.

That kind of distracted me from the supposedly awesome stuff about this novel.

Also, such melodrama. Cut it out, guys.more
Better than I thought it would be, but I'm not sure how frequently I'll go back to read it...more
The story is dark, but doesn't everyone wants close friends like these?more
'Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood' is the sequel to Wells' first novel, 'Little Altars Everywhere'. Following the Walker clan from the first book, 'Divine Secrets' is a journey into the relationship between Ya-Ya queen Vivi Abbott Walker and her theatre director daughter, Siddalee. Full of accounts from both of their lives from birth to present day, the novel weaves a story about the way the past can shape us, break us and ultimately heal us. When Sidda mistakenly opens up to a journalist about her abusive childhood and it is published in the paper for all to see, her already tenuous relationship with her mother is damaged to what they feel is the point of no return. This chasm between mother and daughter sets Sidda on an emotional crash course through her past in an attempt to reconcile with the hurt and pain of her childhood, and to help her with her ability to love her fiance, Connor McGill. Told in alternating perspectives and decades, 'Divine Secrets' takes the reader on a journey from the sultry, humid Louisiana bayou, to the cool, earthy Washington forests.Rebecca Wells is a skilled writer and weaver of tales. Her writing is sumptuous, and reading through the different vignettes feels like pure gluttony. Every sense is aroused with her writing, which is one of the things I love most about it. She describes everything so properly and so thoroughly that you can't help but feel like you are right there, surrounded by this wacky cast of characters. 'Divine Secrets' is a quick read and would appeal most to the Southern Lit and Women's Lit crowds. If you like gossip, scandal and humor, then this is definitely a great choice for you! It has its issues, but I find it to be a well rounded novel and give it four stars!more
I loved getting to know Vivi, first through her daughter’s eyes, then more directly with recounts of her past. The themes of the book like mother/daughter relationship, female friendship and childhood impact are very common but made so interesting in this book through colorful and multi facet characters. Excellent writing style.The thing that did not work so well for me: the very Hollywoodian end, with the 180 degree change in Vivi/Sidda relationship and Connor’s character depicted as the perfect guy.more
Another good read from Wells. I enjoy reading a bit of southern story telling as I am from and living in the south. The look into the mother and daughter relationship is both insightful and entertaining. Great addition for your must read list.more
finally i picked up the book after hearing so much about it. my impression: a story about spoiled and rich kids who create problems if there dont have to be any. i am 117 pages in it and hoped for a twist but i think i will give up. writing style is excellent but the story is not my thing.more
Usually I don't like books that switch from the present into flashbacks (i.e. "Water for Elephants"), but I thought it was well executed in "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood." Vivi's daughter, Sidda, is just as entertaining to read about as Vivi's adventurious exploits with her girl-hood friends known as the "Ya-Ya's." The voices are fresh and distinct for each character. This is a book about a strained mother-daughter relationship, the power of friendship through the decades, and acceptance. A worthwhile read.more
In a way I feel like I'm being stingy giving this only three and a half stars. This is the last book on a list of over twenty I've tried from a chicklit/women's fiction recommendation list. Style-wise, this is at the top. I'd say that, along with The Girl's Guide to Hunting and Fishing, this was the only book listed that had the quality that approaches literary fiction--it's lyrical at times, witty, quotable, with a narrative that mixes first and third person, letters and newspaper clippings from the scrapbook of "Ya-Ya-rabilia." It's a novel that celebrates a friendship of nearly 60 years from 1934 to 1993, and a rocky mother/daughter relationship. It's also about forgiveness, the subject of one of the three quotations that front the book that tells us we all "need to forgive and be forgiven every day, every hour." That could make for a very moving book, but I remained unmoved because I absolutely hated the central character, the "Queen" of the "Ya-Ya Sisterhood," Vivi Walker. When the book begins in 1993, she's just cut her daughter, Sidda, out of her life for the crime of telling the New York Times "lies" about how Vivi beat her with a belt. They're not lies though, as we learn just pages in. They're not even "exaggerated" as Ya-Ya sister Necie claims to Sidda. They're minimized. Vivi beat ten-year-old Sidda and her younger sister and two brothers with a belt until they were bloody. Sidda still bears the physical (and emotional) scars thirty years later. And, as we learn just a few pages in, to the present day Vivi blames Sidda for not stopping her. Sadly, so does Sidda. And not only is Vivi still drinking all these years later after her abuse of her children fueled by drink, pages into the book in the present day of the novel, she's handing over a Bloody Mary to her fellow senior citizen Ya-Ya Teensy for her to drink as Teensy drives the car.*SPOILERS BE HERE BELOW IF YOU CARE* Sidda is constantly begging her mother for forgiveness through out the book, celebrating her mother's friendship with the Ya-Ya sisterhood, excusing and worshiping her mother for her "vivid" and "vivacious" spirit. It's all very "Ya-Ya-No." (Ya-Ya speak for "pathetic" we're told.) Yes, if you've reached 40 years old, it's way past time to let go of the anger and stop blaming your parents for your problems. But that's different from forgiveness and reconciliation. To really forgive, the person who hurt you needs to be sorry and say so and stop hurting you. It sucks sure if they die and never give you that, and if they don't, you have to move on. But if that doesn't happen that doesn't mean they should get a pass just because they'll be the only parents you'll ever have. Not when the abuse is this extreme and still ongoing. I mean, I know. I've read that Philip Larken poem "This Be the Verse." It's true. Parents screw you up, but they were screwed up first. They're human. And the book makes Vivi understandable, and therefore potentially forgivable. But I don't think she (and the book) come anywhere near earning the Hallmark moment ending.more
I did not like this book. It's stupid and sad. I finished it because I'm stubborn and I wanted to make sure there wasn't a final twist that would change everything.more
I don't find books about alcoholic mothers who mistreat their children and remain emotionally stunted all that interesting. I finished this book because I was trying to figure out why so many people loved it...I still don't get it.more
The book is well-written and definitely has interesting themes but I just couldn't get into it. Perhaps I was suckered by the hype and simply expected too much from the book and the author.more
The story of Siddalee Walker and her relationship with her mother and her mother's life-long friends, the Ya-Yas. Very enjoyable.more
Any woman that had a best friend growing up, that one person that knew everything about you and loved you anyway, will appreciate the friendship described in this novel. Wells writes beautifully wounded characters that are flawed and honest.more
I liked this book. I liked the story and the characters. I also enjoyed the movie. I liked the detail in this book. I read it while I was away from home and it had me feeling really home sick. I feel the details about Louisiana and older adults is accurate in some cases. Who doesn't have some sort of family drama. I found this book very sweet and touching at times and sad and complex in others.more
I thought this was going to be a fun read as it's obviously something about friendship, mothers and daughters, that type of thing. However, once I began to read, I'm afraid I could not wait to put it down.This is a story of 40-year old Siddalee Walker whose relationship with her mother was tested when she unknowingly humiliated her mother in the papers. Siddalee began to doubt her own capacity to love, and her mother sends her a scrapbook, named "The Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood." The book contained various personal mementos of her mother and her three friends that was hoped to help Siddalee in understanding her mother without putting too much emotional effort in the process.However, although she has the scrapbook, she does not understand everything in it, and only the readers are given the opportunity to learn about each mysterious fragments through Vivi's own recollection of the past. That was my first issue with this story. If the readers are the only ones to learn about Vivi's own memories and not Siddalee, how can she be as magnanimous and understanding of her mother's flaws? How did she gain understanding in the first place? Merely sorting through another person's memorabilia does not help one become enlightened about that person's self.Another problem with this story is that it was all too predictable. And harrowing. And long. Mother had a problematic past. Daughter could not understand mother's hardness. Daughter finds out about mother's childhood. Mother and Daughter reconcile. That's been done in a dozen other books and I thought this one would be different. Turns out, I'm wrong. In an effort to take us back to Vivi's past, we are introduced to her three other friends. We are shown their wild, adventurous lives; but theirs was a life of privilege compared to other children at that time - Vivi did suffer physical and mental abuse from her parents, but don't we all - that their characters did not appear lovable, and instead, they seemed spoiled, bratty, and insensitive.The story tried to create too much tension in every conflict, that made it as shallow as its characters. I have been touched by some dramatic stories of abuse and learning to stand up amidst all the pain, but this one made it seem like Vivi was too caught up in her own high school life and drama that she was too busy to grow up and live up to her responsibilities as an adult, a wife, and a mother. The story provided us with an excuse as to how she reacts with such hysteria in everything that happens, and with why she drinks and smokes every chance she gets. Hardly encouraging reading.It did not help matters any when I found out this was just a sequel. Wow, the author was not done writing yet? Obviously she's not, and obviously, she's still got a lot on her mind. The book was full to the brim of exhausting selfish details about the ya-yas I was tempted not just a few times to put it down.On the bright side, I like the imagery and the imagination behind the story. You could visualize beautiful South in all its heat and magic, and you could almost feel the cold of Seattle. In terms of vision and powers of description, I have to hand it to the author. In the future, I hope the author could extend her powers of description and imagination not just to the scenes and settings of her stories, but to the story itself - that it not become too boringly predictable and unlovable. This book had potential, but it just could not carry the weight of all the character's idiosyncrasies and the author's exhausting ideas.Overall I'm happy that I did not have to spend too much when I bought this book. Maybe it's just me, but I did not enjoy this story about a supposedly strong Southern woman with secrets. But if this is your cup of tea, go ahead and dive in. You might just like it.more
One of the tags that pops out on this book is chick-lit. I agree with that, but feel that this book wants to be more. For me chick-lit is light reading about women, mixed with a bit of drama and romance. This book is very much about women, with lots of drama and a little bit of romance, but I get the feeling that the author wanted to make it a family saga, which didn't work for me. I thought Vivi was a bit ridiculous, and Sidda is hanging on to the drama, and both of them annoyed me at times. I will still try to see the movie, because the story has its nice bits, but I won't expect too much.more
Read in March 2000. This was lots of fun and we had a good discussion too. Lovely to see frienships that last through time.more
This book reminded of my dear, lifelong friend, Kristy. Having a deep friendship with someone from childhood through old womanhood is rare. That is what the four women in this book have in common with Kristy and I (even though we're not old women yet; we'll get there!)more
At times reminded me of my own growing upmore
What can I say, apart from this is my sort of book, loved it. Thought the film was pretty good too. Family, friendships, loyalty, love, mothers, daughters, humour and heartbreak, this book has it all!more
I read this a long time ago, but from what I do remember: I laughed a lot, but definitely didn't cry. I think the relationship between mother and daughter was developed in a meaningful and complex way. Overall, the book was a bit disappointing given all of its success. One for the masses. One where the movie version would have done well enough.more
I was glad to be done with this book. It was one of the most irritating books I’ve ever forced myself to finish. Yet, it did keep me reading. Someone should write a book that reflects the realities of female friendship, complete with petty jealousies, divided loyalties, growing apart, etc., as well as the good times. This sugar-coated, bourbon-soaked Oprah-pleaser, about four lifelong female friends who don’t mature emotionally beyond age 12, does not reflect any reality I’ve ever heard of. It contained a lot of sentimental New Age religion (contrasted with a distinctly anti-Catholic message), anachronistic entreaties against racism (to appeal to modern sensibilities and Oprah, I guess), and a scene that hinges on embarrassing bodily functions. On top of that, the characters other than the supposedly-charming Vivi and her uninteresting daughter Sidda were not developed enough to tell apart. I’m glad it’s over, and I don’t think I will be reading the prequel.more
If you liked the movie you will love the book. It's a good easy read filled with enjoyable character in whim you'll find something to love.more
Very formulated. Couldn't bring myself to finish it.more
Men, put this book down. Don't you see? It says "Sisterhood"...right there on the cover. For women only, but, for us, a delightful read.more
Really easy and enjoyable to read. The characters are memorable and really draw you in to their world.more
I couldn't put this put down - however, didn't think it was written particularly well (feel that the narrative was written as dialogue and was a bit casually in the way it skipped between 1st and 3rd person), having said that, as an Australian, caught myself reading it with a Southern accent - but the story was fantastic - and the first time in ages I walked through the street reading the book. The Ya-Ya friendship, the self-expression and Vivi/Siddha relationship were just a delight and moved me to tears. The vignetts around the the Ya-Ya's and petite Ya-Ya's described and the delight and effort they all put into living was wonderful.more
Read all 65 reviews

Reviews

The things I enjoyed most were the Southern setting, and learning bits and pieces of the strong friendship among the four girls->women throughout the book. Since I've moved several times since high school, I haven't maintained the closeness with my childhood girlfriends like the women in this book did. I liked how the scrapbook told part of the story as well.more
I found this book pretty weird. The child abuse was so lightly dealt with -- and it's still abuse if it only happens once. Physical abuse, even on just one occasion, sticks in your mind. Especially when you're a child and you haven't had that many experiences yet. It's not something to be just... dismissed and so easily forgiven.

That kind of distracted me from the supposedly awesome stuff about this novel.

Also, such melodrama. Cut it out, guys.more
Better than I thought it would be, but I'm not sure how frequently I'll go back to read it...more
The story is dark, but doesn't everyone wants close friends like these?more
'Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood' is the sequel to Wells' first novel, 'Little Altars Everywhere'. Following the Walker clan from the first book, 'Divine Secrets' is a journey into the relationship between Ya-Ya queen Vivi Abbott Walker and her theatre director daughter, Siddalee. Full of accounts from both of their lives from birth to present day, the novel weaves a story about the way the past can shape us, break us and ultimately heal us. When Sidda mistakenly opens up to a journalist about her abusive childhood and it is published in the paper for all to see, her already tenuous relationship with her mother is damaged to what they feel is the point of no return. This chasm between mother and daughter sets Sidda on an emotional crash course through her past in an attempt to reconcile with the hurt and pain of her childhood, and to help her with her ability to love her fiance, Connor McGill. Told in alternating perspectives and decades, 'Divine Secrets' takes the reader on a journey from the sultry, humid Louisiana bayou, to the cool, earthy Washington forests.Rebecca Wells is a skilled writer and weaver of tales. Her writing is sumptuous, and reading through the different vignettes feels like pure gluttony. Every sense is aroused with her writing, which is one of the things I love most about it. She describes everything so properly and so thoroughly that you can't help but feel like you are right there, surrounded by this wacky cast of characters. 'Divine Secrets' is a quick read and would appeal most to the Southern Lit and Women's Lit crowds. If you like gossip, scandal and humor, then this is definitely a great choice for you! It has its issues, but I find it to be a well rounded novel and give it four stars!more
I loved getting to know Vivi, first through her daughter’s eyes, then more directly with recounts of her past. The themes of the book like mother/daughter relationship, female friendship and childhood impact are very common but made so interesting in this book through colorful and multi facet characters. Excellent writing style.The thing that did not work so well for me: the very Hollywoodian end, with the 180 degree change in Vivi/Sidda relationship and Connor’s character depicted as the perfect guy.more
Another good read from Wells. I enjoy reading a bit of southern story telling as I am from and living in the south. The look into the mother and daughter relationship is both insightful and entertaining. Great addition for your must read list.more
finally i picked up the book after hearing so much about it. my impression: a story about spoiled and rich kids who create problems if there dont have to be any. i am 117 pages in it and hoped for a twist but i think i will give up. writing style is excellent but the story is not my thing.more
Usually I don't like books that switch from the present into flashbacks (i.e. "Water for Elephants"), but I thought it was well executed in "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood." Vivi's daughter, Sidda, is just as entertaining to read about as Vivi's adventurious exploits with her girl-hood friends known as the "Ya-Ya's." The voices are fresh and distinct for each character. This is a book about a strained mother-daughter relationship, the power of friendship through the decades, and acceptance. A worthwhile read.more
In a way I feel like I'm being stingy giving this only three and a half stars. This is the last book on a list of over twenty I've tried from a chicklit/women's fiction recommendation list. Style-wise, this is at the top. I'd say that, along with The Girl's Guide to Hunting and Fishing, this was the only book listed that had the quality that approaches literary fiction--it's lyrical at times, witty, quotable, with a narrative that mixes first and third person, letters and newspaper clippings from the scrapbook of "Ya-Ya-rabilia." It's a novel that celebrates a friendship of nearly 60 years from 1934 to 1993, and a rocky mother/daughter relationship. It's also about forgiveness, the subject of one of the three quotations that front the book that tells us we all "need to forgive and be forgiven every day, every hour." That could make for a very moving book, but I remained unmoved because I absolutely hated the central character, the "Queen" of the "Ya-Ya Sisterhood," Vivi Walker. When the book begins in 1993, she's just cut her daughter, Sidda, out of her life for the crime of telling the New York Times "lies" about how Vivi beat her with a belt. They're not lies though, as we learn just pages in. They're not even "exaggerated" as Ya-Ya sister Necie claims to Sidda. They're minimized. Vivi beat ten-year-old Sidda and her younger sister and two brothers with a belt until they were bloody. Sidda still bears the physical (and emotional) scars thirty years later. And, as we learn just a few pages in, to the present day Vivi blames Sidda for not stopping her. Sadly, so does Sidda. And not only is Vivi still drinking all these years later after her abuse of her children fueled by drink, pages into the book in the present day of the novel, she's handing over a Bloody Mary to her fellow senior citizen Ya-Ya Teensy for her to drink as Teensy drives the car.*SPOILERS BE HERE BELOW IF YOU CARE* Sidda is constantly begging her mother for forgiveness through out the book, celebrating her mother's friendship with the Ya-Ya sisterhood, excusing and worshiping her mother for her "vivid" and "vivacious" spirit. It's all very "Ya-Ya-No." (Ya-Ya speak for "pathetic" we're told.) Yes, if you've reached 40 years old, it's way past time to let go of the anger and stop blaming your parents for your problems. But that's different from forgiveness and reconciliation. To really forgive, the person who hurt you needs to be sorry and say so and stop hurting you. It sucks sure if they die and never give you that, and if they don't, you have to move on. But if that doesn't happen that doesn't mean they should get a pass just because they'll be the only parents you'll ever have. Not when the abuse is this extreme and still ongoing. I mean, I know. I've read that Philip Larken poem "This Be the Verse." It's true. Parents screw you up, but they were screwed up first. They're human. And the book makes Vivi understandable, and therefore potentially forgivable. But I don't think she (and the book) come anywhere near earning the Hallmark moment ending.more
I did not like this book. It's stupid and sad. I finished it because I'm stubborn and I wanted to make sure there wasn't a final twist that would change everything.more
I don't find books about alcoholic mothers who mistreat their children and remain emotionally stunted all that interesting. I finished this book because I was trying to figure out why so many people loved it...I still don't get it.more
The book is well-written and definitely has interesting themes but I just couldn't get into it. Perhaps I was suckered by the hype and simply expected too much from the book and the author.more
The story of Siddalee Walker and her relationship with her mother and her mother's life-long friends, the Ya-Yas. Very enjoyable.more
Any woman that had a best friend growing up, that one person that knew everything about you and loved you anyway, will appreciate the friendship described in this novel. Wells writes beautifully wounded characters that are flawed and honest.more
I liked this book. I liked the story and the characters. I also enjoyed the movie. I liked the detail in this book. I read it while I was away from home and it had me feeling really home sick. I feel the details about Louisiana and older adults is accurate in some cases. Who doesn't have some sort of family drama. I found this book very sweet and touching at times and sad and complex in others.more
I thought this was going to be a fun read as it's obviously something about friendship, mothers and daughters, that type of thing. However, once I began to read, I'm afraid I could not wait to put it down.This is a story of 40-year old Siddalee Walker whose relationship with her mother was tested when she unknowingly humiliated her mother in the papers. Siddalee began to doubt her own capacity to love, and her mother sends her a scrapbook, named "The Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood." The book contained various personal mementos of her mother and her three friends that was hoped to help Siddalee in understanding her mother without putting too much emotional effort in the process.However, although she has the scrapbook, she does not understand everything in it, and only the readers are given the opportunity to learn about each mysterious fragments through Vivi's own recollection of the past. That was my first issue with this story. If the readers are the only ones to learn about Vivi's own memories and not Siddalee, how can she be as magnanimous and understanding of her mother's flaws? How did she gain understanding in the first place? Merely sorting through another person's memorabilia does not help one become enlightened about that person's self.Another problem with this story is that it was all too predictable. And harrowing. And long. Mother had a problematic past. Daughter could not understand mother's hardness. Daughter finds out about mother's childhood. Mother and Daughter reconcile. That's been done in a dozen other books and I thought this one would be different. Turns out, I'm wrong. In an effort to take us back to Vivi's past, we are introduced to her three other friends. We are shown their wild, adventurous lives; but theirs was a life of privilege compared to other children at that time - Vivi did suffer physical and mental abuse from her parents, but don't we all - that their characters did not appear lovable, and instead, they seemed spoiled, bratty, and insensitive.The story tried to create too much tension in every conflict, that made it as shallow as its characters. I have been touched by some dramatic stories of abuse and learning to stand up amidst all the pain, but this one made it seem like Vivi was too caught up in her own high school life and drama that she was too busy to grow up and live up to her responsibilities as an adult, a wife, and a mother. The story provided us with an excuse as to how she reacts with such hysteria in everything that happens, and with why she drinks and smokes every chance she gets. Hardly encouraging reading.It did not help matters any when I found out this was just a sequel. Wow, the author was not done writing yet? Obviously she's not, and obviously, she's still got a lot on her mind. The book was full to the brim of exhausting selfish details about the ya-yas I was tempted not just a few times to put it down.On the bright side, I like the imagery and the imagination behind the story. You could visualize beautiful South in all its heat and magic, and you could almost feel the cold of Seattle. In terms of vision and powers of description, I have to hand it to the author. In the future, I hope the author could extend her powers of description and imagination not just to the scenes and settings of her stories, but to the story itself - that it not become too boringly predictable and unlovable. This book had potential, but it just could not carry the weight of all the character's idiosyncrasies and the author's exhausting ideas.Overall I'm happy that I did not have to spend too much when I bought this book. Maybe it's just me, but I did not enjoy this story about a supposedly strong Southern woman with secrets. But if this is your cup of tea, go ahead and dive in. You might just like it.more
One of the tags that pops out on this book is chick-lit. I agree with that, but feel that this book wants to be more. For me chick-lit is light reading about women, mixed with a bit of drama and romance. This book is very much about women, with lots of drama and a little bit of romance, but I get the feeling that the author wanted to make it a family saga, which didn't work for me. I thought Vivi was a bit ridiculous, and Sidda is hanging on to the drama, and both of them annoyed me at times. I will still try to see the movie, because the story has its nice bits, but I won't expect too much.more
Read in March 2000. This was lots of fun and we had a good discussion too. Lovely to see frienships that last through time.more
This book reminded of my dear, lifelong friend, Kristy. Having a deep friendship with someone from childhood through old womanhood is rare. That is what the four women in this book have in common with Kristy and I (even though we're not old women yet; we'll get there!)more
At times reminded me of my own growing upmore
What can I say, apart from this is my sort of book, loved it. Thought the film was pretty good too. Family, friendships, loyalty, love, mothers, daughters, humour and heartbreak, this book has it all!more
I read this a long time ago, but from what I do remember: I laughed a lot, but definitely didn't cry. I think the relationship between mother and daughter was developed in a meaningful and complex way. Overall, the book was a bit disappointing given all of its success. One for the masses. One where the movie version would have done well enough.more
I was glad to be done with this book. It was one of the most irritating books I’ve ever forced myself to finish. Yet, it did keep me reading. Someone should write a book that reflects the realities of female friendship, complete with petty jealousies, divided loyalties, growing apart, etc., as well as the good times. This sugar-coated, bourbon-soaked Oprah-pleaser, about four lifelong female friends who don’t mature emotionally beyond age 12, does not reflect any reality I’ve ever heard of. It contained a lot of sentimental New Age religion (contrasted with a distinctly anti-Catholic message), anachronistic entreaties against racism (to appeal to modern sensibilities and Oprah, I guess), and a scene that hinges on embarrassing bodily functions. On top of that, the characters other than the supposedly-charming Vivi and her uninteresting daughter Sidda were not developed enough to tell apart. I’m glad it’s over, and I don’t think I will be reading the prequel.more
If you liked the movie you will love the book. It's a good easy read filled with enjoyable character in whim you'll find something to love.more
Very formulated. Couldn't bring myself to finish it.more
Men, put this book down. Don't you see? It says "Sisterhood"...right there on the cover. For women only, but, for us, a delightful read.more
Really easy and enjoyable to read. The characters are memorable and really draw you in to their world.more
I couldn't put this put down - however, didn't think it was written particularly well (feel that the narrative was written as dialogue and was a bit casually in the way it skipped between 1st and 3rd person), having said that, as an Australian, caught myself reading it with a Southern accent - but the story was fantastic - and the first time in ages I walked through the street reading the book. The Ya-Ya friendship, the self-expression and Vivi/Siddha relationship were just a delight and moved me to tears. The vignetts around the the Ya-Ya's and petite Ya-Ya's described and the delight and effort they all put into living was wonderful.more
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