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In one of the biggest religion news stories of the new millennium, the Associated Press announced that Professor Antony Flew, the world's leading atheist, now believes in God.

Flew is a pioneer for modern atheism. His famous paper, Theology and Falsification, was first presented at a meeting of the Oxford Socratic Club chaired by C. S. Lewis and went on to become the most widely reprinted philosophical publication of the last five decades. Flew earned his fame by arguing that one should presuppose atheism until evidence of a God surfaces. He now believes that such evidence exists, and There Is a God chronicles his journey from staunch atheism to believer.

For the first time, this book will present a detailed and fascinating account of Flew's riveting decision to revoke his previous beliefs and argue for the existence of God. Ever since Flew's announcement, there has been great debate among atheists and believers alike about what exactly this "conversion" means. There Is a God will finally put this debate to rest.

This is a story of a brilliant mind and reasoned thinker, and where his lifelong intellectual pursuit eventually led him: belief in God as designer.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061758171
List price: $10.99
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A fascinating account of the transformation of a lifelong atheist to accepting, on logical grounds, that there has to be a creator or god of all that is or that might be in the Cosmos. When neither side of the argument can prove their case objectively, that is scientifically, and when it is logically impossible to prove that something does not exist, any attempt by either side to convince the other is surely a waste of air-time.more
If any book could change my mind ... it won't be this one. The prose is so dense in places I found myself skim reading, which meant I lost the thread of the author's arguments, and by the end didn't really care about it at all. Here's a classic passage. Try to read it without your eyes glazing over."The nerve of the distinction between the movings involved in an action and the motions that constitute necessitated behavior is that the latter behavior is physically necessitated, wheras the sense, the direction, and the character of actions as such are that, as a matter of logic, they necessarily cannot be physically necessitated (and as a matter of brute fact, they are not)."Huh?In fact, the best reason to get hold of this book is for the appendix at the back in which New Testament scholar N.T. Wright answers the following questions: 1) What grounds are there for claiming, from the texts, that Jesus is God Incarnate? and 2) What evidence is there for the resurrection of Christ?N.T. Wright's answers to these questions provide a neat and tidy summary of his general theological position, for which I happen to have a great deal of respect. So instead of wading through his books you could start right here. It is Wright who challenges me the most and I'd recommend this appendix for believers and non-believers alike.more
A very fast and thought provoking read.more
Read all 5 reviews

Reviews

A fascinating account of the transformation of a lifelong atheist to accepting, on logical grounds, that there has to be a creator or god of all that is or that might be in the Cosmos. When neither side of the argument can prove their case objectively, that is scientifically, and when it is logically impossible to prove that something does not exist, any attempt by either side to convince the other is surely a waste of air-time.more
If any book could change my mind ... it won't be this one. The prose is so dense in places I found myself skim reading, which meant I lost the thread of the author's arguments, and by the end didn't really care about it at all. Here's a classic passage. Try to read it without your eyes glazing over."The nerve of the distinction between the movings involved in an action and the motions that constitute necessitated behavior is that the latter behavior is physically necessitated, wheras the sense, the direction, and the character of actions as such are that, as a matter of logic, they necessarily cannot be physically necessitated (and as a matter of brute fact, they are not)."Huh?In fact, the best reason to get hold of this book is for the appendix at the back in which New Testament scholar N.T. Wright answers the following questions: 1) What grounds are there for claiming, from the texts, that Jesus is God Incarnate? and 2) What evidence is there for the resurrection of Christ?N.T. Wright's answers to these questions provide a neat and tidy summary of his general theological position, for which I happen to have a great deal of respect. So instead of wading through his books you could start right here. It is Wright who challenges me the most and I'd recommend this appendix for believers and non-believers alike.more
A very fast and thought provoking read.more
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