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Editor’s Note

“Dark & Otherworldly...”

Not just for the fantasy lover, realists will also relate to this dark & otherworldly criticism of American idolatry & deeply emotional tale of love lost.
Scribd Editor

The storm was coming….Shadow spent three years in prison, keeping his head down, doing his time. All he wanted was to get back to the loving arms of his wife and to stay out of trouble for the rest of his life. But days before his scheduled release, he learns that his wife has been killed in an accident, and his world becomes a colder place.

On the plane ride home to the funeral, Shadow meets a grizzled man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday. A self-styled grifter and rogue, Wednesday offers Shadow a job. And Shadow, a man with nothing to lose accepts.

But working for the enigmatic Wednesday is not without its price, and Shadow soon learns that his role in Wednesday's schemes will be far more dangerous than he ever could have imagined. Entangled in a world of secrets, he embarks on a wild road trip and encounters, among others, the murderous Czernobog, the impish Mr. Nancy, and the beautiful Easter -- all of whom seem to know more about Shadow than he himself does.

Shadow will learn that the past does not die, that everyone, including his late wife, had secrets, and that the stakes are higher than anyone could have imagined.

All around them a storm of epic proportions threatens to break. Soon Shadow and Wednesday will be swept up into a conflict as old as humanity itself. For beneath the placid surface of everyday life a war is being fought -- and the prize is the very soul of America.

As unsettling as it is exhilarating, American Gods is a dark and kaleidoscopic journey deep into myth and across an America at once eerily familiar and utterly alien. Magnificently told, this work of literary magic will haunt the reader far beyond the final page.

Topics: Ghosts, Gods & Goddesses, United States of America, Epic, Dark, Black Humor, Adventurous, Norse Mythology, Folk and Fairy Tales, War, Mythology, Journeys, Greek Mythology, Road Trip, Postmodern, and Bodyguards

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061792663
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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Best book I've read in 5 years more
It seems Neil loves to talk about himself. more
First Gaiman I've read and I wasn't disappointed. Gaiman is a master when it comes to combining a detailed plot with a good, quick read. The story never slows down, never feels superfluous. The lore is fascinating. The characters are well developed. Even minor characters develop well within the wider plot.

If you love good fiction and mythology, this book is for you. It has everything you could want in a read, and then some. I highly recommend this book.more
I did not care for the book. I stopped reading the book alter the hooker came Into the scene.
more
Smart, beautiful and thought provoking. more
This was my first Gaiman experience. Not intentionally--I've been kind of reading around him for years, and just never got around to picking one up and reading it until now.The verdict: I liked it, but not as much as I was hoping or expecting I would. For one thing, I wonder a little bit if I would have preferred to read a version other than the "Author's Preferred Text." There were quite a few digressions that, while interesting, may not have been entirely essential to the story. Then again, I have no way of knowing that the sections in question were the sections that were left out of the original edition, so that may not have helped. In general, though, I do think it could have been a little more tightly written.I also didn't particularly connect with any of the characters. The main character, Shadow, was pretty aloof throughout the bulk of the novel, just going with the flow and going where events took him. That's not necessarily a bad thing in itself, but it seemed a little incongruous for that type of character to be going on this grand journey of America and swept into these momentous events rather than directing any of the action himself. You realize as the novel progresses, of course, that that's sort of the point, but still, as you're reading, it just seems strange.That said, one element of this novel that I did find quite compelling is the relationship between Shadow and his wife Laura. It's nuanced and complex, and not just because she's recently deceased. It's one source of genuine surprise throughout, as it never takes quite the turn you expect.Also, the writing is fantastic. It's fascinating to see America itself examined in depth through the eyes of an outsider immersed in the culture, and Gaiman does an amazing job of capturing scenes and moments in ways that ring true. That's quite an accomplishment for a novel based in mythology and fantasy, with so many aspects of surreality. And the writing of various gods posing as more or less ordinary human beings was often delightful.So yeah, while I didn't absolutely love this book, there's enough that I really dug about it that I can get why people really like his work. I'll check out some more of it.more
Totally lost interest in this story. Don't know if it was me or the story. The first 1/4 of the story was riveting, but it seemed to have taken a turn for the worse after that. It lost me at the point when Shadow and Mr. Wednesday entered into a different dimension via a carousel and it was revealed that Mr. Wednesday is actually the Norse god Odin. Kind of just got weird from that point on. Just not my writing style I guess. Moving on.more
Certainly an interesting read. As usual, Mr. Gaiman astounds me with the depth of his imagination and the way he can so easily provoke reflection. Just be warned that the book is long enough to drag in a few places (and there are a couple of unanswered questions; for instance, who was going after Mad Sweeney about that coin?) and that unless you have a much better understanding of myths and legends than I do, you might want to keep a google search handy so you can look up what Shadow is dealing with. Overall, a good read if you're looking for philosophy and new ideas.more
Complex and funny. Gaiman= Geniusmore
Perhaps this book came overhyped by my friends, as it left me a little dissappointed. Overall it was a good read, but long, and I found Gaiman's other novels such as "Neverwhere" better.more
I liked this story more for how I thought other people would like it than for myself. Sad, magical, and vivid, AMERICAN GODS did more to impress me with the mythology than make me believe in any of the characters.more
First, this was a combination of audio book and reading it myself. The audio book was actually better than reading it on my own! Great book though. Even though God is everywhere in this country...does he really exist here. Very original idea. It's kind of like Percy Jackson for adults.

However, there are certain parts of the book that were confusing. The main character isn't too forthcoming with information so at times I got a little lost. Despite that though, it's a good read and an even better listen.more
Loved it! Although I think I could give 5 stars if I read it again when I am not horribly sick and half paying attention.

I really loved the idea of the old gods interacting with the new gods of America. It was a very clever story line and the character building and such was fantastic.

Now I have to go nurse myself back to health with copious amounts of vitamin C, but you can be sure that I will be reading this book again.

Recommended.more
I love this book, and I've read it so often. The concept is amazing, and I love all the little details. It kind of makes me want to go to America on a road trip...more
I got hooked from the first few pages, and it would've been a 5 Star book if the last 100 pages or so hadn't felt so rushed. But still well worth the read.more
I was swept right off my feet and it sneaks up on you in a big way. At the beginning I felt like the story was just too strange for my taste. Soon enough I found myself with my kindle in my hand every free moment.

A blend of old and new, the story begins with Shadow just as he is released from prison, soon after, on his way home to resume his pre-prison life he meets Wednesday - a god of the old world and beliefs. Shadow is soon employed by Wednesday and finds himself on a mission to rally the 'old gods' against the new. The old gods were brought by newcomers to the country and have faded as new gods have grown in influence I.e. media. This setup is just the portal to a deeper story that I will certainly visiting over and over again. Brilliant.

more
Astonishing from beginning to end. Need to reread at some point. This applies to the original text from 2001.more
After being so cruelly disappointed in Anansi Boys, I had to go back and see if this was as great a book as I remembered it being. This is a dangerous exercise, always, but this time it worked out okay. The second time through, I could stand back a little and see Gaiman at work. In other words, I didn't fall so deeply into Shadow's world this time, however, my admiration for this book remains untarnished by a re-read.more
I should have written this review earlier, just after reading the book. It was such a rich tale, sometimes confusing, that I'm no longer sure what to say about it. Gaiman was born in England but I believe lives in Wisconsin now, and has a good eye and ear for all our American foibles and contradictions. If you want a better analysis, read Jon's review. I do recommend this book to anyone who is not afraid of fantasy.more
I like the kind of book that when you finish you just stop to absorb what you've read. no matter how many times I read American Gods it makes me stop and think when I've finished (and while I'm reading). This is the kind of power that Neil Gaiman has with his writing. It pulls you in and makes you stop for a moment.more
This book finished far better than it started; the first 100 pages had a cursory quality to them, though ultimately the story improved (and grew a little more believable, even as it grew less believable, an odd statement but likely clear to those who have read this book).

I'm wavering between three and four stars; it was intricately plotted and an interesting story, but at times it seemed a little loose, and it still isn't entirely clear to me why Shadow was so important to the gods that he was brought in at the level he was.

Zelazny did this sort of thing about as well as anyone, and I don't know that Gaiman's work measures up to this standard, though I liked it far better than Stephen Brust's recasting of Lucifer's fall (To Reign in Hell).

Others have compared it to Stephen King's The Stand, whose characters never quite sprang to life for me.

Gaiman's book does nicely gather steam and offers up a satisfying finish, and it'll probably creep up to four starts by the time I'm done writing this review, though I don't really understand how they're making a series out of the thing.

After reading the book, I'm not sure I'll watch.more
I’m sorry, I can’t give this book a fair review. Partially because I love it so freaking much, and partially because it’s hard for me to describe the book.

Sure, I could probably go on about the plot or the characters, but the thing about American Gods is that it’s a book that when I put it down, I can’t stop thinking about it. And that’s just the first thing I love about it; that there’s so many themes that Gaiman touches on but there’s no one specific “THIS IS IS WHAT THE BOOK’S ABOUT” moment.” Just the initial concept of how gods come into being may drive the story, but that’s not just what the book’s about. I’d give you a laundry list, but I can’t even delve into the themes and ideas that all get discussed.

The mythology is rich and varied. You don’t have to know every culture that Gaiman references throughout the book, he covers each deity and background skillfully without bogging the reader with explanatory details. And how he uses the gods and myths that do appear is so well-crafted, it feels like the events depicted could have happened in real life. Gaiman blurs the line between reality and fantasy so well that I can really see Odin working as a two-bit conman. This is also added with the side stories of the different gods and mortals who brought their beliefs to America. In other hands, I’m sure that the tracks into other plotlines would have been clumsy, but Gaiman uses them to add so much more depth to the world. And speaking of blurring the line between fantasy and reality, I get so lost in this book that even the real world locations that get mentioned in the book feel like they’re made up or couldn’t possibly be real.

I said in my review for The Graveyard Book that Gaiman rarely has defined heroes and villains (depending on the book), and American Gods is no exception. There are characters who do unspeakable things, yet, these characters are still pitiable and even likeable. (Doesn’t excuse what it is that they do, though.) Shadow’s a good guy who’s done bad things, but he never sugarcoats his actions or tries to justify them. Wednesday is…Wednesday. It’s hard to go into specifics because I know there’ll be spoilers involved. But even the new gods, who are supposed to seem like the ‘bad’ guys, have moments of humanity and compassion.

And the writing of this book and the plotting—just, no words that I can physically use. It’s a very slow build-up but once everything’s moved into place, the plot just takes off. I’ve read this book roughly about fifteen times since I first picked it up, I know the twists and I know the surprises. EVERY time I’ve read it, though, I’m still finding new clues, new bits that I missed, subtle hints to the reveals (and they are there).

This is just about the closest thing to a perfect book that I own. Like I said, I’ve read it so many times, and yet, I still love it. I’m never bored or tired of the plot, I want to know more about this world and just…yeah, again. No words.
more
Okay now I've had some time to digest this, and have started the "sequel." The story here really is a bit of a jumble. Several times I found myself sitting at trying to decipher what Gaiman was trying to say with some of his interludes. But it worked for me. Even when it made no sense, in a normal context. But then, the story is not in any semblance of a normal context.more
I was hoping for something different. It's not an "okay" book, at all, it's actually a pretty great book. But to quote Randy whatsisname, "For me, it was just a'ight."

I found it very guy-y, especially when sex was involved. I could totally see some half-smart high school boy thinking it was heh heh really cool.

I just didn't dig it the way I dug Stardust.more
This book reminds me of all the reasons I love urban fantasy.
Thematically, it reminds me greatly of a lot of Charles de Lint, though it's much darker than both de Lint's work and Stardust or Neverwhere.

On the surface, the book is about gods, both modern and ancient, but really, it's about how fickle that Americans can be, and how shallowly we hold many things we, as a culture, believe are important to us. I'm not sure how I feel about such a thing being said by a non-American author, but the points he makes apply to the rest of the world as well -- just more obvious in the US.

As we loose our traditions our ancestors have had for generations or centuries, we replace them with other, perhaps less durable, traditions. A century or two ago, most cultures had strong story-telling or folk song traditions. The stories would be repeated and elaborated upon for generations. While your grandfather might not have told that exact story, or played that exact song, there would be something recognizable in it -- the words would be different, but at its heart, the stories would be related.

But with the world today, we're changing so rapidly that its just not possible to create that commonality from one generation to the next. Our stories are not the same stories told to our parents. They're the stories told by the TV. And the stories it tells us are not the same stories that it tells to our children or our next door neighbor. Our children's children probably won't watch TV, they probably won't have the internet as we know it. There will be something newer, greater, more advanced that will replace it.

We watch a TV show or read a book, and for the most part, that show has no meaning. Sure, it's something you can talk about to your friends if they watched the show as well, but when the next show comes on or the next book gets read, there's something new to talk about. A year from now, you wouldn't share it with your friends again unless it comes on in a re-run. You probably wouldn't even recall the details. That story, in whatever form it took, would have the impact of a ripple, rather than the wave of, say, trickster tales or even Grimm's Fairy tales.

I think the argument being made is that culture has become something temporary, ephemeral rather than something that has weight and lasting power. We spend a lot of energy on things that don't matter -- that won't exist in 5 or 10 years, or won't exist tomorrow. You might be sated for now, but because it's so temporary, there's something unsatisfying about it.more
I just bumped it up to 3 stars because it was a fine and enjoyable waste of an evening. But really, you should just go read 'Deathbird Stories' instead.more
Completely brilliant; the latter part of this book hits like a punch in the mouth. You expect dark elements from Neil Gaiman, and in this book, you get them in spades.more
Definitely good, ticks all the boxes, but it wasn't as good as I might have expected.
I really liked Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman and Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. They wrote together and continued in the Mythical-realist style but went in different directions.In this book he seems to take the whole, personification of mythical gods and forces, too seriously and it made me miss the humour of terry pratchett or even Christopher Moore.

For me there is one great mythical-realist book. Little Big by John Crowley. But, maybe coming to it from this book, one could find it long and winding and a little twee. Still, for me, it started the genre, and remains the best.more
Geezealoo that was dark. It was very well written but if I read it in the wrong place or mood it would probably make me suicidal.more
Read all 362 reviews

Reviews

Best book I've read in 5 years more
It seems Neil loves to talk about himself. more
First Gaiman I've read and I wasn't disappointed. Gaiman is a master when it comes to combining a detailed plot with a good, quick read. The story never slows down, never feels superfluous. The lore is fascinating. The characters are well developed. Even minor characters develop well within the wider plot.

If you love good fiction and mythology, this book is for you. It has everything you could want in a read, and then some. I highly recommend this book.more
I did not care for the book. I stopped reading the book alter the hooker came Into the scene.
more
Smart, beautiful and thought provoking. more
This was my first Gaiman experience. Not intentionally--I've been kind of reading around him for years, and just never got around to picking one up and reading it until now.The verdict: I liked it, but not as much as I was hoping or expecting I would. For one thing, I wonder a little bit if I would have preferred to read a version other than the "Author's Preferred Text." There were quite a few digressions that, while interesting, may not have been entirely essential to the story. Then again, I have no way of knowing that the sections in question were the sections that were left out of the original edition, so that may not have helped. In general, though, I do think it could have been a little more tightly written.I also didn't particularly connect with any of the characters. The main character, Shadow, was pretty aloof throughout the bulk of the novel, just going with the flow and going where events took him. That's not necessarily a bad thing in itself, but it seemed a little incongruous for that type of character to be going on this grand journey of America and swept into these momentous events rather than directing any of the action himself. You realize as the novel progresses, of course, that that's sort of the point, but still, as you're reading, it just seems strange.That said, one element of this novel that I did find quite compelling is the relationship between Shadow and his wife Laura. It's nuanced and complex, and not just because she's recently deceased. It's one source of genuine surprise throughout, as it never takes quite the turn you expect.Also, the writing is fantastic. It's fascinating to see America itself examined in depth through the eyes of an outsider immersed in the culture, and Gaiman does an amazing job of capturing scenes and moments in ways that ring true. That's quite an accomplishment for a novel based in mythology and fantasy, with so many aspects of surreality. And the writing of various gods posing as more or less ordinary human beings was often delightful.So yeah, while I didn't absolutely love this book, there's enough that I really dug about it that I can get why people really like his work. I'll check out some more of it.more
Totally lost interest in this story. Don't know if it was me or the story. The first 1/4 of the story was riveting, but it seemed to have taken a turn for the worse after that. It lost me at the point when Shadow and Mr. Wednesday entered into a different dimension via a carousel and it was revealed that Mr. Wednesday is actually the Norse god Odin. Kind of just got weird from that point on. Just not my writing style I guess. Moving on.more
Certainly an interesting read. As usual, Mr. Gaiman astounds me with the depth of his imagination and the way he can so easily provoke reflection. Just be warned that the book is long enough to drag in a few places (and there are a couple of unanswered questions; for instance, who was going after Mad Sweeney about that coin?) and that unless you have a much better understanding of myths and legends than I do, you might want to keep a google search handy so you can look up what Shadow is dealing with. Overall, a good read if you're looking for philosophy and new ideas.more
Complex and funny. Gaiman= Geniusmore
Perhaps this book came overhyped by my friends, as it left me a little dissappointed. Overall it was a good read, but long, and I found Gaiman's other novels such as "Neverwhere" better.more
I liked this story more for how I thought other people would like it than for myself. Sad, magical, and vivid, AMERICAN GODS did more to impress me with the mythology than make me believe in any of the characters.more
First, this was a combination of audio book and reading it myself. The audio book was actually better than reading it on my own! Great book though. Even though God is everywhere in this country...does he really exist here. Very original idea. It's kind of like Percy Jackson for adults.

However, there are certain parts of the book that were confusing. The main character isn't too forthcoming with information so at times I got a little lost. Despite that though, it's a good read and an even better listen.more
Loved it! Although I think I could give 5 stars if I read it again when I am not horribly sick and half paying attention.

I really loved the idea of the old gods interacting with the new gods of America. It was a very clever story line and the character building and such was fantastic.

Now I have to go nurse myself back to health with copious amounts of vitamin C, but you can be sure that I will be reading this book again.

Recommended.more
I love this book, and I've read it so often. The concept is amazing, and I love all the little details. It kind of makes me want to go to America on a road trip...more
I got hooked from the first few pages, and it would've been a 5 Star book if the last 100 pages or so hadn't felt so rushed. But still well worth the read.more
I was swept right off my feet and it sneaks up on you in a big way. At the beginning I felt like the story was just too strange for my taste. Soon enough I found myself with my kindle in my hand every free moment.

A blend of old and new, the story begins with Shadow just as he is released from prison, soon after, on his way home to resume his pre-prison life he meets Wednesday - a god of the old world and beliefs. Shadow is soon employed by Wednesday and finds himself on a mission to rally the 'old gods' against the new. The old gods were brought by newcomers to the country and have faded as new gods have grown in influence I.e. media. This setup is just the portal to a deeper story that I will certainly visiting over and over again. Brilliant.

more
Astonishing from beginning to end. Need to reread at some point. This applies to the original text from 2001.more
After being so cruelly disappointed in Anansi Boys, I had to go back and see if this was as great a book as I remembered it being. This is a dangerous exercise, always, but this time it worked out okay. The second time through, I could stand back a little and see Gaiman at work. In other words, I didn't fall so deeply into Shadow's world this time, however, my admiration for this book remains untarnished by a re-read.more
I should have written this review earlier, just after reading the book. It was such a rich tale, sometimes confusing, that I'm no longer sure what to say about it. Gaiman was born in England but I believe lives in Wisconsin now, and has a good eye and ear for all our American foibles and contradictions. If you want a better analysis, read Jon's review. I do recommend this book to anyone who is not afraid of fantasy.more
I like the kind of book that when you finish you just stop to absorb what you've read. no matter how many times I read American Gods it makes me stop and think when I've finished (and while I'm reading). This is the kind of power that Neil Gaiman has with his writing. It pulls you in and makes you stop for a moment.more
This book finished far better than it started; the first 100 pages had a cursory quality to them, though ultimately the story improved (and grew a little more believable, even as it grew less believable, an odd statement but likely clear to those who have read this book).

I'm wavering between three and four stars; it was intricately plotted and an interesting story, but at times it seemed a little loose, and it still isn't entirely clear to me why Shadow was so important to the gods that he was brought in at the level he was.

Zelazny did this sort of thing about as well as anyone, and I don't know that Gaiman's work measures up to this standard, though I liked it far better than Stephen Brust's recasting of Lucifer's fall (To Reign in Hell).

Others have compared it to Stephen King's The Stand, whose characters never quite sprang to life for me.

Gaiman's book does nicely gather steam and offers up a satisfying finish, and it'll probably creep up to four starts by the time I'm done writing this review, though I don't really understand how they're making a series out of the thing.

After reading the book, I'm not sure I'll watch.more
I’m sorry, I can’t give this book a fair review. Partially because I love it so freaking much, and partially because it’s hard for me to describe the book.

Sure, I could probably go on about the plot or the characters, but the thing about American Gods is that it’s a book that when I put it down, I can’t stop thinking about it. And that’s just the first thing I love about it; that there’s so many themes that Gaiman touches on but there’s no one specific “THIS IS IS WHAT THE BOOK’S ABOUT” moment.” Just the initial concept of how gods come into being may drive the story, but that’s not just what the book’s about. I’d give you a laundry list, but I can’t even delve into the themes and ideas that all get discussed.

The mythology is rich and varied. You don’t have to know every culture that Gaiman references throughout the book, he covers each deity and background skillfully without bogging the reader with explanatory details. And how he uses the gods and myths that do appear is so well-crafted, it feels like the events depicted could have happened in real life. Gaiman blurs the line between reality and fantasy so well that I can really see Odin working as a two-bit conman. This is also added with the side stories of the different gods and mortals who brought their beliefs to America. In other hands, I’m sure that the tracks into other plotlines would have been clumsy, but Gaiman uses them to add so much more depth to the world. And speaking of blurring the line between fantasy and reality, I get so lost in this book that even the real world locations that get mentioned in the book feel like they’re made up or couldn’t possibly be real.

I said in my review for The Graveyard Book that Gaiman rarely has defined heroes and villains (depending on the book), and American Gods is no exception. There are characters who do unspeakable things, yet, these characters are still pitiable and even likeable. (Doesn’t excuse what it is that they do, though.) Shadow’s a good guy who’s done bad things, but he never sugarcoats his actions or tries to justify them. Wednesday is…Wednesday. It’s hard to go into specifics because I know there’ll be spoilers involved. But even the new gods, who are supposed to seem like the ‘bad’ guys, have moments of humanity and compassion.

And the writing of this book and the plotting—just, no words that I can physically use. It’s a very slow build-up but once everything’s moved into place, the plot just takes off. I’ve read this book roughly about fifteen times since I first picked it up, I know the twists and I know the surprises. EVERY time I’ve read it, though, I’m still finding new clues, new bits that I missed, subtle hints to the reveals (and they are there).

This is just about the closest thing to a perfect book that I own. Like I said, I’ve read it so many times, and yet, I still love it. I’m never bored or tired of the plot, I want to know more about this world and just…yeah, again. No words.
more
Okay now I've had some time to digest this, and have started the "sequel." The story here really is a bit of a jumble. Several times I found myself sitting at trying to decipher what Gaiman was trying to say with some of his interludes. But it worked for me. Even when it made no sense, in a normal context. But then, the story is not in any semblance of a normal context.more
I was hoping for something different. It's not an "okay" book, at all, it's actually a pretty great book. But to quote Randy whatsisname, "For me, it was just a'ight."

I found it very guy-y, especially when sex was involved. I could totally see some half-smart high school boy thinking it was heh heh really cool.

I just didn't dig it the way I dug Stardust.more
This book reminds me of all the reasons I love urban fantasy.
Thematically, it reminds me greatly of a lot of Charles de Lint, though it's much darker than both de Lint's work and Stardust or Neverwhere.

On the surface, the book is about gods, both modern and ancient, but really, it's about how fickle that Americans can be, and how shallowly we hold many things we, as a culture, believe are important to us. I'm not sure how I feel about such a thing being said by a non-American author, but the points he makes apply to the rest of the world as well -- just more obvious in the US.

As we loose our traditions our ancestors have had for generations or centuries, we replace them with other, perhaps less durable, traditions. A century or two ago, most cultures had strong story-telling or folk song traditions. The stories would be repeated and elaborated upon for generations. While your grandfather might not have told that exact story, or played that exact song, there would be something recognizable in it -- the words would be different, but at its heart, the stories would be related.

But with the world today, we're changing so rapidly that its just not possible to create that commonality from one generation to the next. Our stories are not the same stories told to our parents. They're the stories told by the TV. And the stories it tells us are not the same stories that it tells to our children or our next door neighbor. Our children's children probably won't watch TV, they probably won't have the internet as we know it. There will be something newer, greater, more advanced that will replace it.

We watch a TV show or read a book, and for the most part, that show has no meaning. Sure, it's something you can talk about to your friends if they watched the show as well, but when the next show comes on or the next book gets read, there's something new to talk about. A year from now, you wouldn't share it with your friends again unless it comes on in a re-run. You probably wouldn't even recall the details. That story, in whatever form it took, would have the impact of a ripple, rather than the wave of, say, trickster tales or even Grimm's Fairy tales.

I think the argument being made is that culture has become something temporary, ephemeral rather than something that has weight and lasting power. We spend a lot of energy on things that don't matter -- that won't exist in 5 or 10 years, or won't exist tomorrow. You might be sated for now, but because it's so temporary, there's something unsatisfying about it.more
I just bumped it up to 3 stars because it was a fine and enjoyable waste of an evening. But really, you should just go read 'Deathbird Stories' instead.more
Completely brilliant; the latter part of this book hits like a punch in the mouth. You expect dark elements from Neil Gaiman, and in this book, you get them in spades.more
Definitely good, ticks all the boxes, but it wasn't as good as I might have expected.
I really liked Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman and Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. They wrote together and continued in the Mythical-realist style but went in different directions.In this book he seems to take the whole, personification of mythical gods and forces, too seriously and it made me miss the humour of terry pratchett or even Christopher Moore.

For me there is one great mythical-realist book. Little Big by John Crowley. But, maybe coming to it from this book, one could find it long and winding and a little twee. Still, for me, it started the genre, and remains the best.more
Geezealoo that was dark. It was very well written but if I read it in the wrong place or mood it would probably make me suicidal.more
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