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Do miracles really happen? Can we know if the supernatural world exists? "The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares the way for this, or results from this." In Miracles, C. S. Lewis takes this key idea and shows that a Christian must not only accept but rejoice in miracles as a testimony of the unique personal involvement of God in creation. Using his characteristic warmth, lucidity, and wit, Lewis challenges the rationalists and cynics who are mired in their lack of imagination and provides a poetic and joyous affirmation that miracles really do occur in everyday lives.

Topics: Language, Christianity, Miracles, Jesus, Provocative, Inklings, Essays, and Irish Author

Published: HarperCollins on Jun 16, 2009
ISBN: 9780061949760
List price: $8.99
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a man after Gods own heart. cs lewis. thanks for equipping usread more
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This is not the best of Lewis's works. At first it makes sense, but dont trot these arguments out in your philosophy class. Essentially Lewis makes a place for God's work in the universe, but miracles are merely Gods' interaction with reality.read more
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How I’ve missed C. S. Lewis! I picked this book up to read for a book club, and settled into it like conversing with an old friend.The topic is miracles. Do they exist or not? Do they contradict with Nature or not? This is not a nuts and bolts proof book; it is a call to see miracles in a different light. There is, for instance, nothing miraculous about turning water into wine … nature itself can do this. God has created a vegetable organism that can turn water, soil and sunlight into a juice which will, under proper conditions, become wine. Wine is merely water modified. Should it surprise you that one day, God short circuited the process, using earthenware jars instead of vegetable fibers to hold the water?As in this example, Lewis’s arguments sometimes amount only to warm fuzzies. Pantheism, he explains, is nothing special, for people are merely predisposed to believe this way … pantheism has hung around like an unwanted parasite from the beginning. In contrast, a the story of a dying and rising God is surely true because nature itself teaches this concept, as any farmer knows. Now, beneath the surface, these two arguments are similar, but Lewis manages to draw the desired results from each with a bit of conversation made elegant in one circumstance and ugly in another.Lewis errs also in his science, imagining that “every event in Nature must be connected with previous events in the Cause and Effect relation.” We know better today (Lewis was writing in 1947), and thus the foundation crumbles for many of his arguments against Naturalism. (Lewis attempts to argue that there must be a God who is not a part of Nature, and reasons that this God must surely be our creator.)But it’s the way Lewis writes that so grabs the imagination! I absolutely love reading his books. There is a spellbinding discussion of Morality and Human Reason herein (their divinity earns their capitalization). Yet I cannot honestly award the book five stars, because Lewis never accomplishes what he sets out to do. Lewis’s God is elegant and beautiful, but no less unlikely for Lewis’s efforts, and must remain a matter of faith. Yet for those who already believe in this particular God, this book cannot fail to lift their spirits.Very much recommended.read more
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a man after Gods own heart. cs lewis. thanks for equipping us
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is not the best of Lewis's works. At first it makes sense, but dont trot these arguments out in your philosophy class. Essentially Lewis makes a place for God's work in the universe, but miracles are merely Gods' interaction with reality.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
How I’ve missed C. S. Lewis! I picked this book up to read for a book club, and settled into it like conversing with an old friend.The topic is miracles. Do they exist or not? Do they contradict with Nature or not? This is not a nuts and bolts proof book; it is a call to see miracles in a different light. There is, for instance, nothing miraculous about turning water into wine … nature itself can do this. God has created a vegetable organism that can turn water, soil and sunlight into a juice which will, under proper conditions, become wine. Wine is merely water modified. Should it surprise you that one day, God short circuited the process, using earthenware jars instead of vegetable fibers to hold the water?As in this example, Lewis’s arguments sometimes amount only to warm fuzzies. Pantheism, he explains, is nothing special, for people are merely predisposed to believe this way … pantheism has hung around like an unwanted parasite from the beginning. In contrast, a the story of a dying and rising God is surely true because nature itself teaches this concept, as any farmer knows. Now, beneath the surface, these two arguments are similar, but Lewis manages to draw the desired results from each with a bit of conversation made elegant in one circumstance and ugly in another.Lewis errs also in his science, imagining that “every event in Nature must be connected with previous events in the Cause and Effect relation.” We know better today (Lewis was writing in 1947), and thus the foundation crumbles for many of his arguments against Naturalism. (Lewis attempts to argue that there must be a God who is not a part of Nature, and reasons that this God must surely be our creator.)But it’s the way Lewis writes that so grabs the imagination! I absolutely love reading his books. There is a spellbinding discussion of Morality and Human Reason herein (their divinity earns their capitalization). Yet I cannot honestly award the book five stars, because Lewis never accomplishes what he sets out to do. Lewis’s God is elegant and beautiful, but no less unlikely for Lewis’s efforts, and must remain a matter of faith. Yet for those who already believe in this particular God, this book cannot fail to lift their spirits.Very much recommended.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lewis attempts to reconcile miracles with science. Whether or not he succeeded remains up to the reader. He does however present his arguments in a scientific way rather than relying on arguments strictly based on faith. In other words he argues from beyond Christianity and its beliefs. Well worth the time to read.
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I have given up on this one about two thirds of the way through. Lewis is a very powerful thinker and his ratiocination is generally very good, but I could not click with much of this. As in Mere Christianity, he is at his best and most persuasive on the origins of human morality. However, I was less convinced about his arguments on naturalism and about how the power to reason must necessarily originate from beyond nature, and by his reasoning on probability. In the end belief in miracles comes down just to that - belief or otherwise, and I remain agnostic on this point.
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One of the most mocked aspects of the Christian faith is the existence of miracles. In fact, the very heart of the Christian faith is based on a miracle. How can one believe in Christianity unless one believes in miracles, or at least is willing to allow for their existence? The simple answer, according to C. S. Lewis, is that they can't. In his book, Miracles, Lewis defended the logic of believing in such supernatural events. In a fashion that those who have read his other Apologetics works will recognize, Lewis uses a type of “stepping-stone” or building argument. He starts with the notion of defining the difference between the belief in the “supernatural” and the merely “natural”, and then goes on to systematically define what counts for supernatural, and, of the concepts under the umbrella of that term, what would count as a miracle. What makes this book effective is that Lewis actually shows a sense of history and skepticism. What I mean by this is that he points out the historical “lineage” of both the beliefs of Christianity in terms of the miraculous, and of the general anti-Christian naturalist philosophy. Granted, it is a very quick sketch, but that is what makes it so useful. It is quite brief, yet has the pertinent information. On the issue of skepticism, Lewis argues that most of the extra-Biblical accounts of “miracles” are probably not actually miracles, though they certainly could be.At the end of the book, Lewis makes a distinction between a “miracle” and something that would be said to be predestined, or a work of “Providence”. He points out that such acts of Providence are not miracles, but this doesn't mean that they are any less of an example of God's supernatural power. The idea that, from the beginning of Creation, God designed that some “saving grace” should appear at such and such a time, is truly as awe-inspiring as any miraculous account. In a section of the book near the end, Lewis differentiates between the miracles of the “old Creation” (upon which we currently live), and those of the “New Creation” which we have had a foretaste of with Christ's resurrection and life before the Ascension, and which we can look forward to in the New Heaven/New Earth. Lewis admits that most of what he says on the subject of possible New Creation miracles is sheer conjecture, but it is one we ought to cling to and discuss for the sake of our Christian walk and growth. Randy Alcorn's premise in his very important book, Heaven, (which has changed my life and perspective, and I encourage all to read) was not the first modern call to return to the hope and study of Heaven. C. S. Lewis preceded him by nearly sixty years.This account and defense of miracles is one that I would Highly Recommend to others.
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