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Weaving a vibrant tapestry of fact and fiction, Into the Wilderness sweeps us into another time and place...and into the heart of a forbidden, incandescent affair between a spinster Englishwoman and an American frontiersman. Here is an epic of romance and history that will captivate readers from the very first page.

When Elizabeth Middleton, twenty-nine years old and unmarried, leaves her Aunt Merriweather's comfortable English estate to join her father and brother in the remote mountain village of Paradise on the edge of the New York wilderness, she does so with a strong will and an unwavering purpose: to teach school.

It is December of 1792 when she arrives in a cold climate unlike any she has ever experienced. And she meets a man different from any she has ever encountered--a white man dressed like a Native American, tall and lean and unsettling in his blunt honesty. He is Nathaniel Bonner, also known to the Mohawk people as Between-Two-Lives.

Determined to provide schooling for all the children of the village--white, black, and Native American--Elizabeth soon finds herself at odds with local slave owners. Much to her surprise, she clashes with her own father as well. Financially strapped, Judge Middleton has plans for his daughter--betrothal to local doctor Richard Todd. An alliance with Todd could extract her father from ruin but would call into question the ownership of Hidden Wolf, the mountain where Nathaniel, his father, and a small group of Native Americans live and hunt.

As Judge Middleton brings pressure to bear against his daughter, she is faced with a choice between compliance and deception, a flight into the forest, and a desire that will bend her hard will to compromise and transformation. Elizabeth's ultimate destiny, here in the heart of the wilderness, lies in the odyssey to come: trials of faith and flesh, and passion born amid Nathaniel's own secrets and divided soul.

Interweaving the fate of the remnants of the Mohawk Nation with the destiny of two lovers, Sara Donati's compelling novel creates a complex, profound, passionate portrait of an emerging America.
Published: Random House Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780440338079
List price: $12.99
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A straightforward adventure and romance, INTO THE WILDERNESS was all about "What happens next?" for me. As Nathaniel and Elizabeth navigate the social minefield that is their world, I felt like the main characters were utterly open books and the villains were unpredictable black boxes. I didn't know *what* bad thing they were going to do, I just knew it was coming... which set up up beautifully to be completely untrusting of Todd... which has me dying for book two to see if I'm right.

I've neither seen nor read The Last of the Mohicans, but Hawkeye and Nathaniel are charismatic enough to hold center stage on their own. I may be missing some significance of supporting characters, but Donati does a good job explaining the major moving pieces. I was confused as heck to see Ian Murray and Claire Fraser show up, though I applaud Donati including them as "cannon historical fiction elements".more
"Into the Wilderness" is one of my top three favorite books. There is nothing I don't like about it. I love the descriptions of life in the times; the characters are very developed and complex; the storyline is full of action and 18th century drama. If you are a fan of historical fiction and you like in-depth, meaty books: I would recommend this book.more
In December of 1792 Elizabeth Middleton leaves England to join her family in a remote New York mountain village. It is a vastly different culture and place than she has ever seen. Elizabeth he meets a man who eventually wins her affection, a white man dressed like a Native American: Nathaniel Bonner. He is known to the Mohawk people as Between-Two-Lives. Elizabeth makes a place for herself by trying to provide schooling for all the children of the village. Soon she finds herself at odds with her family and the town over her dislike for the treatment of the Mohawk peoples.This book is really long. It's a good book; lots of historical context and information about the place and time in colonial America. It highlights the hatred between the native peoples and the white settlers and Revolutionary men. Plot moves well but it really is a LONG book. I enjoyed it because of the history of NY State and the Mohawk peoples.more
The book had blurbs praising it from romance writers Diana Gabaldon and Amanda Quick and the trade magazine Romantic Times. Not a good sign I'd like it, if this was being marketed to those who frequent the romance aisle. The prose was more readable than most books I've read marketed as romance, even if hardly stellar, but what killed this novel for me is how it takes the "historical" out of historical fiction. This is set in the New York frontier in 1793, dealing with the twenty-nine-year-old Elizabeth Middleton. Raised in England, she's come to America hoping to set up a school. New York is my own state, and the idea of a novel set there during that period intrigued me. However, two examples of a lack of grounding in the period stood out to me before the fifty page mark. The first is when a woman talks about how they could use a "schoolmarm." The fact is during the colonial and Federal period, school teachers in America were overwhelmingly under twenty-five, White and male. Not only wouldn't a person assume a teacher would be female--the feminization of the profession didn't begin until late in the 19th Century--but Miss Middleton would invariably have stirred up opposition because of her gender. Back then women weren't thought to have the authority or strength to control a classroom with children older than eight. Also, at a certain point, Nathaniel Bonner, (seemingly patterned after Cooper's Nathaniel Bumppo) calls Elizabeth a "bluestocking," and she doesn't know what that is. The term was common in Britain in the period. I've seen people poo poo this kind of criticism. It's just fiction they cry. Nonsense! Part of successful fiction is that you don't jar a reader out of their willing suspension of disbelief; and the appeal of historical fiction is the sense you're entering into another time and place, not reading about modern people in costumes. This isn't to say some allowances shouldn't be made and some mistakes forgiven. Elizabeth Middleton from the beginning struck me as far too modern in her sensibilities--she doesn't seem to care about class or race and wants to keep her independence and remain unmarried. I'm willing to allow that; her mother was said to be a Quaker, so a reader can allow Elizabeth some nonconformity, but I could never settle in comfortably into a belief in the tale, which quickly shaped up to be a rather formulaic romance riffing off Last of the Mohicans with guest starring appearances from Jamie and Clare of Outlander and cameo roles from Jane Austen's novels. (Poor Jane Bingley, forced to appear in such a tawdry bodice-ripper.) This novel reads like really, really bad fan fiction, one that impoverishes rather than enriches the originals.more
If you want to escape the modern world and go on an adventure through the American wilderness, this is the perfect book for you (it will really make you appreciate a hot shower and soap). Into the Wilderness is the first in a series of books by Sara Donati. This is the type of book where you feel like you know the characters when it's over. I felt almost as close to Nathaniel and Elizabeth as I did to Jamie and Claire from Outlander (F.Y.I. - they are mentioned in this book!). This book also taught me a lot about the relationships between the Americans and the Native Americans post-Revolutionary War, which I found to be incredibly interesting. The only thing I didn't like about the book was that there were a few slow parts. I just wanted to scream at the characters "We don't have time for this, let's go!” All in all, if you love romantic historical fiction, you will love this book.more
So I enjoyed this. Good, likeable characters, some action, some romance. Will be reading the rest in the series.more
This book suffered from my too high expectations, I suppose. Although there were things I really liked about the setting and layers of characters,it does not come close to the level of believability in the Outlander series. I found the heroine annoying and couldn't forgive her for some of the dumb things she did after her husband warned her not to do them in an effort to keep her safe. Elizabeth was hard to warm up to. Also there were a few plot holes that bothered me. We are very concerned in the beginning about Nathaniel and his family being able to survive after their winter supplies are raided, then find out later that he and his family have enough gold and silver hidden away to equal millions of dollars in today's economy. It didn't make sense. The next book in this series received even more critically negative reviews than this one, so I don't plan to continue the series.more
Outstanding historical novel. The characters were real, with believable weaknesses and strengths. The story and setting were realistic and beautifully portrayed. I was captivated within the first two chapters. Elizabeth's determination to live her life her way, yet still make those around her happy is an interesting mix, and is a battle that many women face even today. The only complaint I have about the book is that I don't have the next one in the series on hand, and so I have to wait to continue reading about Elizabeth's and Nathaniel's adventures!more
Set during the years of 1792 and 1973, Into the Wilderness is the story of the love affair between Elizabeth Middleton, an English woman who comes to upstate New York to be a school teacher; and Nathaniel Bonner, son of “Hawkeye” Bonner.The story takes the reader a lot of places; literally, the characters get lost in the woods at many places and therefore the story seems to chase its own tail sometimes. I loved the idea that the story started out with, but sometimes the author tended to borrow a little too much from the novels of other authors; the story about Claire and Jamie Fraser (from the Outlander series) seemed thrown in there, and not as though it really had any bearing on the rest of the book. I’ve never read James Fenimore Cooper’s book, so I can’t really comment on how close this novel sticks to the original. The author even seemed to channel Jane Austen at one point: “Aunt Merriweather loved children excessively, but Elizabeth thought of her cousin Marianne at an assembly ball, her mouth open in a small moue of disdain as she whispered behind her fan: ‘Imagine Jane Bingley dancing, and so obviously enceinte.’” (p. 555).There are a lot of really good details of the period and place in which Into the Wilderness is set, but I thought that the characters really needed to be improved upon; they seemed very modern to me. Elizabeth is your typical feisty, independent heroine, and Nathaniel is the strong, silent type, who nonetheless exudes less sex appeal than Jamie Fraser in the Outlander series. The characters in Gabaldon’s series were much more interesting and complex than Sara Donati’s. Elizabeth’s constant harping on the fact that she’s a spinster got very, very annoying after a while, too. The romance side of the story is very heavy at first, which I enjoyed (surprisingly enough for me), but it seemed to drop off a bit towards the middle; and Richard was so much like the bad guy from Outlander that I found myself rolling my eyes in several places while reading Into the Wilderness. I’m sorry I didn’t totally love this book, but other people might; Donati does a great job of describing the places she’s writing about.more
Fans of Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series will love this series by Sara Donati, which follows the relationship between the headstrong Englishwoman Elizabeth and Nathaniel Bonner, the son Donati has created for Cora and Daniel of "The Last of the Mohicans." It is well-written, magical, and one of my favorite books to return to.more
This was a beautiful love story. Elizabeth is a stong character, aswell and extreamly smart. She falls in love with Nathaniel and hence we have a very romantic love story. Though it is wonderful they ofcourse go through many hard times and nothing comes easy for them. There story is well worth reading This book is fast paste and for me there was a never a dull moment. A GREAT read. Loved it.more
Loved this book. I can't wait to read the second one. Loved the characters and how well developed they are.more
After reading An Echo in the Bone, I was happy to find this new series to begin. I am really enjoying listening to the audio version of this book and look forward to Nathanial and Elizabeth's adventures to come.more
I liked this story. I wasn't sure I would enjoy the romance part of the main couple's relationship but the caracters are so well developed, I even enjoyed their intimate relationship. A good book to sink you teeth into. i will certainly continue reading this series.more
I'm a big fan of Jennifer Donnelly and Diana Gabaldon, which is why I picked up this book. Not all epic historical romances are good (see my review of A Woman of Substance for a prime example), and this book wasn't the best I've ever read, but I enjoyed it. Elizabeth is a well-rounded character. I found her believable, and someone I wanted to root for and continue getting to know. Nathaniel is handsome and sexy, and their romance is exactly how you want it to be. I definitely recommend the Outlander series before this one (in part so you understand Jamie and Claire's cameo in this book!), but I'm really looking forward to reading the rest of this series.more
I was recommended this series by a fellow LT reader based on my appreciation of the Diana Gabaldon, Outlander series. Thank you! I'm not much of a historical romance reader, unless done well (as an example, I wasn't particularly fond of the series that begins with Knight Errant by R Garcia Y Robertson). However, the writing of Ms. Lippi is excellent and very reminiscent of Diana Gabaldon's style. For me, Elizabeth "Boots" Bonner's journey into the new world and her strength and intelligence encourage the reader to appreciate and identify with her character the way I typically don't identify with most romance heroines. The challenges she and her husband face together are surmountable when they work together to outwit their foes. I did have a "come on!" moment at the end of the book when I learned that Daniel is likely the heir to a Scottish Earldom, but decided I didn't care, at least as it related to the end of the this book. I enjoyed the rest of the book too much. But now I'm waiting to read the next ones (which I couldn't find in the bookstore).more
I was introduced to this author after reading Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series. I loved them both. In fact I was surprised when the author Donati gave a nod to Gabaldon by making mention of some of the characters in one of the books early in the Into the Wilderness series. The series is not complete and I can't wait for more.more
I was so excited to see the names of the characters in the first 10 pages. This is sequel to 'Last of the Mohicans' sorta. It's a continuation of the Daniel Day Lewis movie, not the book, not the Masterpiece Theater mini-series.A very predictable romance in a wonderful story and time period. Nice tie-in with the 'Outlander' series. If you can't get enough of those, and who can? This might tide you over until the next Gabaldon book. The heroine was pretty much a stock character, but a sympathetic one.I couldn't help casting various actors and actors in my head for the movie version.Favorite quotes;She put her hands in her lap to steady them. The thrill of telling her true feeling without considering good manners or the propriety of what she had to say was intoxicating. With more calm than she felt, she met her father's horrified gaze.What a terribly awkward thing it is to be English.But he knew that her own anger was as deep and unfathomable as her sorrow, and that words -- his words -- would not help right now."I was not raised to faint.""I have never fainted in my life," "I will not start now.""I would be surprised if you did.""Then why do you coddle me so?""because you carry [someones] son, grandson and great-grandson.""Luck is for the unprepared and the mediocre.""It was good to be alone again.""Grief will not recall thy father to thee, but by thy conduct thou canst revive him to the world.""He's a dreamer" "He lives in other worlds and comes into this one only when he has some purpose to serve."This was a nice light book to read after the weightier 'Wilderness at Dawn'more
I read this book during a week I should have been packing to move. I could not put the book down to pack boxes! It was captivating. I was enthralled by the adventures. One of my favorite historical fictions.more
It came as no surprise to me that Diana Gabaldon was a mentor of sorts to Sara Donati in the writing of this book. While their writing styles are very different both women have the magical ability to take you to another time and place...and make you fall in love with a man there.And believe me, you will fall in love with Nathaniel Bonner. Living as one of the Indian Mohawks in America’s “Brave New World” Nathaniel is a widower trying desperately to protect his family and home from the intangible threat of prejudice. Enter Elizabeth Middleton, the ambitious spinster daughter of the town judge and probable heiress to Nathaniel’s land. She arrives from London with the intention of setting up a school however her father has other unspoken problems. Clever subplots, hidden agendas, devious antagonists and well-rounded secondary characters all conspire with the complex intricacy of real life to plant Elizabeth firmly in Nathaniel’s arms. Donati writes sex scenes so romantic they will make you cry and romantic scenes so sexy they will make you randy.But don’t let the love story fool you – there’s a reason this book is so fat. It’s full of history and plenty of plot. From about page 200 the plot does not let up, keeping you frantically turning pages to reach the climactic ending. And what a satisfying climax it is. At 876 pages, you may need a little time to recover however if you’re in the mood for a little more loving from Nathaniel, there are another four books.Would I recommend this book? Hell yes! If you’re not one to shy away from big books then go for it – you won’t be disappointed. And for Cross Stitch fans, keep an eye out for Jamie and Claire’s cameo.Favourite line: And Nathaniel saw something he had forgotten about women: that words can do the same work as hands and mouths and a man’s body, that she was as undone by his admission of desire as she had been by his kiss.more
This book ties-in with Outlander as my favourite historical fiction novel. It's a great story about love and adventure, about survival and how women can find their inner strength.more
This is one of those blockbusters, a sure-fire hit for anyone who likes historical romances. This one is set in New York state, around the 1790s. Our heroine is a 28 year old single woman who moves to Paradise (love that name) with her father and brother. Dad has plans for Elizabeth to marry the local doctor once he (dad) has passed Hidden Wolf Mountain to her. The doc will then get dad out of hock. It’s clear from the start that the doc is keener on the land (Hidden Wolf Mountain) that Elizabeth would bring to the marriage, but sadly for him, Elizabeth falls for the Scot-turned-Indian, Nathaniel Bonner. Parts of this story are beyond predictable, but entertaining, nonetheless. One of the most astonishing aspects is the discussion of an incident in the past where Claire Fraser saved someone’s life. Fraser is a character in Cross Stitch by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve never come across one author “borrowing” another author’s character. The book has the usual amount of violence and romance normally associated with this genre. Perfect for a wet weekend.more
It could almost be described as fanfic. This is a story of what happens to Hawkeye of Last of the Mohicans' family a few years later. This story centres around his son Nathaniel. Nathaniel has grown up straddling Native and New cultures and finding that he has more in common with native culture.Elizabeth Middleton arrives in the small town of Paradise, her father has induced her to come with a promise of her fulfilling her life-long dream of being a teacher. However her father has other plans for her, a plan to marry her off in order to pay off some debts. Dr Todd is willing to do anything to get this land. But she isn't attracted to Dr Todd, she's attracted to Nathaniel.It's an interesting story and a fun (if heavy, physically) read. The main characters really showed that they cared for each other but still had moments where both sides misunderstood the other. It could have been divided down or edited a bit but it was an interesting read. There were a few jarring moments where I didn't really get a sense of place, or distances. I found myself wanting to read more despite my reservations and I had to force myself to put it down occasionally (while cursing that the busses were running quickly with 80 pages to go!)more
Excellent . If you love historical novels you will love this. I tripped over this book twice and decided to give it a try. It transports me to upstate New York over two hundred years ago.more
Ok, I'll admit it - when my dad (yes, my dad) handed me this book and told me I needed to read it, I was skeptical. I'm not usually a romance or historical book reader. History class was my worst in school. But I couldn't put this book down! I immediately went to Amazon and purchased her other two books (Fire in the Sky wasn't out yet). Now, I'm desperately (and impatiently) counting down the days until Queen of Swords. Sara Donati's books are absolutely wonderful! I honestly don't read any other books in this type of genre, but I'm now a HUGE Donati fan!!! I get the books, I read them, my dad reads them, my dad's girlfriend reads them... we're completely hooked!more
An amazing tale of personal survival and strength. Her characters are powerful and the love story is sweet. An Excellent read.more
This is the first in a romantic historical fiction series I've read a few times before. This first book in it is my favorite of the four available so far, I think. When I picked this up I needed something whose plot would keep me turning pages, after all the heavy reading in the last book I'd read, and this was exactly what I needed: quick reading without being light, romance without ripping bodices, and a likable cast of characters (when you have two people who are loosely based upon Elizabeth Bennet [and other Austen heroines] and Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Last of the Mohicans" marrying and living in the wilderness of upstate New York in 1792 -- how can it go wrong?). The research is impeccable, but the author doesn't bog you down with a lot of stuff she thought was too interesting to leave out of the book -- which sometimes happens in certain other hefty historical fiction books set in the eighteenth century.more
Overall a fun read. Elizabeth the main character is a strong character and strong woman and like seeing that in books. In some ways a pretty typical story. I enjoyed it enough that I am looking forward to the next few books in the series. I did pick up the next book and I'm finding the series kind of tedious and not sure if I will keep with it.more
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Reviews

A straightforward adventure and romance, INTO THE WILDERNESS was all about "What happens next?" for me. As Nathaniel and Elizabeth navigate the social minefield that is their world, I felt like the main characters were utterly open books and the villains were unpredictable black boxes. I didn't know *what* bad thing they were going to do, I just knew it was coming... which set up up beautifully to be completely untrusting of Todd... which has me dying for book two to see if I'm right.

I've neither seen nor read The Last of the Mohicans, but Hawkeye and Nathaniel are charismatic enough to hold center stage on their own. I may be missing some significance of supporting characters, but Donati does a good job explaining the major moving pieces. I was confused as heck to see Ian Murray and Claire Fraser show up, though I applaud Donati including them as "cannon historical fiction elements".more
"Into the Wilderness" is one of my top three favorite books. There is nothing I don't like about it. I love the descriptions of life in the times; the characters are very developed and complex; the storyline is full of action and 18th century drama. If you are a fan of historical fiction and you like in-depth, meaty books: I would recommend this book.more
In December of 1792 Elizabeth Middleton leaves England to join her family in a remote New York mountain village. It is a vastly different culture and place than she has ever seen. Elizabeth he meets a man who eventually wins her affection, a white man dressed like a Native American: Nathaniel Bonner. He is known to the Mohawk people as Between-Two-Lives. Elizabeth makes a place for herself by trying to provide schooling for all the children of the village. Soon she finds herself at odds with her family and the town over her dislike for the treatment of the Mohawk peoples.This book is really long. It's a good book; lots of historical context and information about the place and time in colonial America. It highlights the hatred between the native peoples and the white settlers and Revolutionary men. Plot moves well but it really is a LONG book. I enjoyed it because of the history of NY State and the Mohawk peoples.more
The book had blurbs praising it from romance writers Diana Gabaldon and Amanda Quick and the trade magazine Romantic Times. Not a good sign I'd like it, if this was being marketed to those who frequent the romance aisle. The prose was more readable than most books I've read marketed as romance, even if hardly stellar, but what killed this novel for me is how it takes the "historical" out of historical fiction. This is set in the New York frontier in 1793, dealing with the twenty-nine-year-old Elizabeth Middleton. Raised in England, she's come to America hoping to set up a school. New York is my own state, and the idea of a novel set there during that period intrigued me. However, two examples of a lack of grounding in the period stood out to me before the fifty page mark. The first is when a woman talks about how they could use a "schoolmarm." The fact is during the colonial and Federal period, school teachers in America were overwhelmingly under twenty-five, White and male. Not only wouldn't a person assume a teacher would be female--the feminization of the profession didn't begin until late in the 19th Century--but Miss Middleton would invariably have stirred up opposition because of her gender. Back then women weren't thought to have the authority or strength to control a classroom with children older than eight. Also, at a certain point, Nathaniel Bonner, (seemingly patterned after Cooper's Nathaniel Bumppo) calls Elizabeth a "bluestocking," and she doesn't know what that is. The term was common in Britain in the period. I've seen people poo poo this kind of criticism. It's just fiction they cry. Nonsense! Part of successful fiction is that you don't jar a reader out of their willing suspension of disbelief; and the appeal of historical fiction is the sense you're entering into another time and place, not reading about modern people in costumes. This isn't to say some allowances shouldn't be made and some mistakes forgiven. Elizabeth Middleton from the beginning struck me as far too modern in her sensibilities--she doesn't seem to care about class or race and wants to keep her independence and remain unmarried. I'm willing to allow that; her mother was said to be a Quaker, so a reader can allow Elizabeth some nonconformity, but I could never settle in comfortably into a belief in the tale, which quickly shaped up to be a rather formulaic romance riffing off Last of the Mohicans with guest starring appearances from Jamie and Clare of Outlander and cameo roles from Jane Austen's novels. (Poor Jane Bingley, forced to appear in such a tawdry bodice-ripper.) This novel reads like really, really bad fan fiction, one that impoverishes rather than enriches the originals.more
If you want to escape the modern world and go on an adventure through the American wilderness, this is the perfect book for you (it will really make you appreciate a hot shower and soap). Into the Wilderness is the first in a series of books by Sara Donati. This is the type of book where you feel like you know the characters when it's over. I felt almost as close to Nathaniel and Elizabeth as I did to Jamie and Claire from Outlander (F.Y.I. - they are mentioned in this book!). This book also taught me a lot about the relationships between the Americans and the Native Americans post-Revolutionary War, which I found to be incredibly interesting. The only thing I didn't like about the book was that there were a few slow parts. I just wanted to scream at the characters "We don't have time for this, let's go!” All in all, if you love romantic historical fiction, you will love this book.more
So I enjoyed this. Good, likeable characters, some action, some romance. Will be reading the rest in the series.more
This book suffered from my too high expectations, I suppose. Although there were things I really liked about the setting and layers of characters,it does not come close to the level of believability in the Outlander series. I found the heroine annoying and couldn't forgive her for some of the dumb things she did after her husband warned her not to do them in an effort to keep her safe. Elizabeth was hard to warm up to. Also there were a few plot holes that bothered me. We are very concerned in the beginning about Nathaniel and his family being able to survive after their winter supplies are raided, then find out later that he and his family have enough gold and silver hidden away to equal millions of dollars in today's economy. It didn't make sense. The next book in this series received even more critically negative reviews than this one, so I don't plan to continue the series.more
Outstanding historical novel. The characters were real, with believable weaknesses and strengths. The story and setting were realistic and beautifully portrayed. I was captivated within the first two chapters. Elizabeth's determination to live her life her way, yet still make those around her happy is an interesting mix, and is a battle that many women face even today. The only complaint I have about the book is that I don't have the next one in the series on hand, and so I have to wait to continue reading about Elizabeth's and Nathaniel's adventures!more
Set during the years of 1792 and 1973, Into the Wilderness is the story of the love affair between Elizabeth Middleton, an English woman who comes to upstate New York to be a school teacher; and Nathaniel Bonner, son of “Hawkeye” Bonner.The story takes the reader a lot of places; literally, the characters get lost in the woods at many places and therefore the story seems to chase its own tail sometimes. I loved the idea that the story started out with, but sometimes the author tended to borrow a little too much from the novels of other authors; the story about Claire and Jamie Fraser (from the Outlander series) seemed thrown in there, and not as though it really had any bearing on the rest of the book. I’ve never read James Fenimore Cooper’s book, so I can’t really comment on how close this novel sticks to the original. The author even seemed to channel Jane Austen at one point: “Aunt Merriweather loved children excessively, but Elizabeth thought of her cousin Marianne at an assembly ball, her mouth open in a small moue of disdain as she whispered behind her fan: ‘Imagine Jane Bingley dancing, and so obviously enceinte.’” (p. 555).There are a lot of really good details of the period and place in which Into the Wilderness is set, but I thought that the characters really needed to be improved upon; they seemed very modern to me. Elizabeth is your typical feisty, independent heroine, and Nathaniel is the strong, silent type, who nonetheless exudes less sex appeal than Jamie Fraser in the Outlander series. The characters in Gabaldon’s series were much more interesting and complex than Sara Donati’s. Elizabeth’s constant harping on the fact that she’s a spinster got very, very annoying after a while, too. The romance side of the story is very heavy at first, which I enjoyed (surprisingly enough for me), but it seemed to drop off a bit towards the middle; and Richard was so much like the bad guy from Outlander that I found myself rolling my eyes in several places while reading Into the Wilderness. I’m sorry I didn’t totally love this book, but other people might; Donati does a great job of describing the places she’s writing about.more
Fans of Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series will love this series by Sara Donati, which follows the relationship between the headstrong Englishwoman Elizabeth and Nathaniel Bonner, the son Donati has created for Cora and Daniel of "The Last of the Mohicans." It is well-written, magical, and one of my favorite books to return to.more
This was a beautiful love story. Elizabeth is a stong character, aswell and extreamly smart. She falls in love with Nathaniel and hence we have a very romantic love story. Though it is wonderful they ofcourse go through many hard times and nothing comes easy for them. There story is well worth reading This book is fast paste and for me there was a never a dull moment. A GREAT read. Loved it.more
Loved this book. I can't wait to read the second one. Loved the characters and how well developed they are.more
After reading An Echo in the Bone, I was happy to find this new series to begin. I am really enjoying listening to the audio version of this book and look forward to Nathanial and Elizabeth's adventures to come.more
I liked this story. I wasn't sure I would enjoy the romance part of the main couple's relationship but the caracters are so well developed, I even enjoyed their intimate relationship. A good book to sink you teeth into. i will certainly continue reading this series.more
I'm a big fan of Jennifer Donnelly and Diana Gabaldon, which is why I picked up this book. Not all epic historical romances are good (see my review of A Woman of Substance for a prime example), and this book wasn't the best I've ever read, but I enjoyed it. Elizabeth is a well-rounded character. I found her believable, and someone I wanted to root for and continue getting to know. Nathaniel is handsome and sexy, and their romance is exactly how you want it to be. I definitely recommend the Outlander series before this one (in part so you understand Jamie and Claire's cameo in this book!), but I'm really looking forward to reading the rest of this series.more
I was recommended this series by a fellow LT reader based on my appreciation of the Diana Gabaldon, Outlander series. Thank you! I'm not much of a historical romance reader, unless done well (as an example, I wasn't particularly fond of the series that begins with Knight Errant by R Garcia Y Robertson). However, the writing of Ms. Lippi is excellent and very reminiscent of Diana Gabaldon's style. For me, Elizabeth "Boots" Bonner's journey into the new world and her strength and intelligence encourage the reader to appreciate and identify with her character the way I typically don't identify with most romance heroines. The challenges she and her husband face together are surmountable when they work together to outwit their foes. I did have a "come on!" moment at the end of the book when I learned that Daniel is likely the heir to a Scottish Earldom, but decided I didn't care, at least as it related to the end of the this book. I enjoyed the rest of the book too much. But now I'm waiting to read the next ones (which I couldn't find in the bookstore).more
I was introduced to this author after reading Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series. I loved them both. In fact I was surprised when the author Donati gave a nod to Gabaldon by making mention of some of the characters in one of the books early in the Into the Wilderness series. The series is not complete and I can't wait for more.more
I was so excited to see the names of the characters in the first 10 pages. This is sequel to 'Last of the Mohicans' sorta. It's a continuation of the Daniel Day Lewis movie, not the book, not the Masterpiece Theater mini-series.A very predictable romance in a wonderful story and time period. Nice tie-in with the 'Outlander' series. If you can't get enough of those, and who can? This might tide you over until the next Gabaldon book. The heroine was pretty much a stock character, but a sympathetic one.I couldn't help casting various actors and actors in my head for the movie version.Favorite quotes;She put her hands in her lap to steady them. The thrill of telling her true feeling without considering good manners or the propriety of what she had to say was intoxicating. With more calm than she felt, she met her father's horrified gaze.What a terribly awkward thing it is to be English.But he knew that her own anger was as deep and unfathomable as her sorrow, and that words -- his words -- would not help right now."I was not raised to faint.""I have never fainted in my life," "I will not start now.""I would be surprised if you did.""Then why do you coddle me so?""because you carry [someones] son, grandson and great-grandson.""Luck is for the unprepared and the mediocre.""It was good to be alone again.""Grief will not recall thy father to thee, but by thy conduct thou canst revive him to the world.""He's a dreamer" "He lives in other worlds and comes into this one only when he has some purpose to serve."This was a nice light book to read after the weightier 'Wilderness at Dawn'more
I read this book during a week I should have been packing to move. I could not put the book down to pack boxes! It was captivating. I was enthralled by the adventures. One of my favorite historical fictions.more
It came as no surprise to me that Diana Gabaldon was a mentor of sorts to Sara Donati in the writing of this book. While their writing styles are very different both women have the magical ability to take you to another time and place...and make you fall in love with a man there.And believe me, you will fall in love with Nathaniel Bonner. Living as one of the Indian Mohawks in America’s “Brave New World” Nathaniel is a widower trying desperately to protect his family and home from the intangible threat of prejudice. Enter Elizabeth Middleton, the ambitious spinster daughter of the town judge and probable heiress to Nathaniel’s land. She arrives from London with the intention of setting up a school however her father has other unspoken problems. Clever subplots, hidden agendas, devious antagonists and well-rounded secondary characters all conspire with the complex intricacy of real life to plant Elizabeth firmly in Nathaniel’s arms. Donati writes sex scenes so romantic they will make you cry and romantic scenes so sexy they will make you randy.But don’t let the love story fool you – there’s a reason this book is so fat. It’s full of history and plenty of plot. From about page 200 the plot does not let up, keeping you frantically turning pages to reach the climactic ending. And what a satisfying climax it is. At 876 pages, you may need a little time to recover however if you’re in the mood for a little more loving from Nathaniel, there are another four books.Would I recommend this book? Hell yes! If you’re not one to shy away from big books then go for it – you won’t be disappointed. And for Cross Stitch fans, keep an eye out for Jamie and Claire’s cameo.Favourite line: And Nathaniel saw something he had forgotten about women: that words can do the same work as hands and mouths and a man’s body, that she was as undone by his admission of desire as she had been by his kiss.more
This book ties-in with Outlander as my favourite historical fiction novel. It's a great story about love and adventure, about survival and how women can find their inner strength.more
This is one of those blockbusters, a sure-fire hit for anyone who likes historical romances. This one is set in New York state, around the 1790s. Our heroine is a 28 year old single woman who moves to Paradise (love that name) with her father and brother. Dad has plans for Elizabeth to marry the local doctor once he (dad) has passed Hidden Wolf Mountain to her. The doc will then get dad out of hock. It’s clear from the start that the doc is keener on the land (Hidden Wolf Mountain) that Elizabeth would bring to the marriage, but sadly for him, Elizabeth falls for the Scot-turned-Indian, Nathaniel Bonner. Parts of this story are beyond predictable, but entertaining, nonetheless. One of the most astonishing aspects is the discussion of an incident in the past where Claire Fraser saved someone’s life. Fraser is a character in Cross Stitch by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve never come across one author “borrowing” another author’s character. The book has the usual amount of violence and romance normally associated with this genre. Perfect for a wet weekend.more
It could almost be described as fanfic. This is a story of what happens to Hawkeye of Last of the Mohicans' family a few years later. This story centres around his son Nathaniel. Nathaniel has grown up straddling Native and New cultures and finding that he has more in common with native culture.Elizabeth Middleton arrives in the small town of Paradise, her father has induced her to come with a promise of her fulfilling her life-long dream of being a teacher. However her father has other plans for her, a plan to marry her off in order to pay off some debts. Dr Todd is willing to do anything to get this land. But she isn't attracted to Dr Todd, she's attracted to Nathaniel.It's an interesting story and a fun (if heavy, physically) read. The main characters really showed that they cared for each other but still had moments where both sides misunderstood the other. It could have been divided down or edited a bit but it was an interesting read. There were a few jarring moments where I didn't really get a sense of place, or distances. I found myself wanting to read more despite my reservations and I had to force myself to put it down occasionally (while cursing that the busses were running quickly with 80 pages to go!)more
Excellent . If you love historical novels you will love this. I tripped over this book twice and decided to give it a try. It transports me to upstate New York over two hundred years ago.more
Ok, I'll admit it - when my dad (yes, my dad) handed me this book and told me I needed to read it, I was skeptical. I'm not usually a romance or historical book reader. History class was my worst in school. But I couldn't put this book down! I immediately went to Amazon and purchased her other two books (Fire in the Sky wasn't out yet). Now, I'm desperately (and impatiently) counting down the days until Queen of Swords. Sara Donati's books are absolutely wonderful! I honestly don't read any other books in this type of genre, but I'm now a HUGE Donati fan!!! I get the books, I read them, my dad reads them, my dad's girlfriend reads them... we're completely hooked!more
An amazing tale of personal survival and strength. Her characters are powerful and the love story is sweet. An Excellent read.more
This is the first in a romantic historical fiction series I've read a few times before. This first book in it is my favorite of the four available so far, I think. When I picked this up I needed something whose plot would keep me turning pages, after all the heavy reading in the last book I'd read, and this was exactly what I needed: quick reading without being light, romance without ripping bodices, and a likable cast of characters (when you have two people who are loosely based upon Elizabeth Bennet [and other Austen heroines] and Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Last of the Mohicans" marrying and living in the wilderness of upstate New York in 1792 -- how can it go wrong?). The research is impeccable, but the author doesn't bog you down with a lot of stuff she thought was too interesting to leave out of the book -- which sometimes happens in certain other hefty historical fiction books set in the eighteenth century.more
Overall a fun read. Elizabeth the main character is a strong character and strong woman and like seeing that in books. In some ways a pretty typical story. I enjoyed it enough that I am looking forward to the next few books in the series. I did pick up the next book and I'm finding the series kind of tedious and not sure if I will keep with it.more
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