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Hugo Award-winning author Timothy Zahn brings his epic two-volume series The Hand of Thrawn to an explosive conclusion with a discovery that rocks the New Republic to its foundations--and threatens to resurrect the Empire.

The Empire's master plan is under way. The New Republic is on the verge of civil war and the rumor that the legendary Admiral Thrawn has returned from the dead is rallying the Imperial forces. Now Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, Princess Leia, and their allies face the challenge of their lives. They must infiltrate a hidden fortress filled with Imperial fanatics, rendezvous with a double-dealing Imperial commander, and journey into enemy territory to learn the identity of those responsible for an act of unthinkable genocide. But most important of all is the truth about Thrawn. In his hands--alive or dead--rests the fate of the New Republic.

Features a bonus section following the novel that includes a primer on the Star Wars expanded universe, and over half a dozen excerpts from some of the most popular Star Wars books of the last thirty years!




© 1998 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM
All rights reserved. Used under authorization.
Published: Random House Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780307796448
List price: $7.99
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I realized once again, upon taking up the second book in this duology, that Timothy Zahn's Star Wars Expanded Universe story The Hand of Thrawn Duology should have been a trilogy. The second book, here reviewed, is the longest novel contributed by any author to the Star Wars universe. As Vision of the Future begins, several threads from the first book were picked up. Luke has gone after Mara Jade, to rescue her from the planet on which she has gone missing. Though he sees several possibilities for danger against loved ones, he follows a Force-vision, and goes in search of her. On separate tracks, Han Solo and Lando Calrissian, as well as Talon Karrde and Shada Du'kal, head off to find copies of the so-called Caamas Document in hopes of ending the bloodshed that has occurred, and preventing a war from beginning. Meanwhile, realizing that the only hope for the tiny remnants of the Empire to survive lies in peace with the New Republic, Grand Admiral Gilad Pellaeon battles internal forces that want to prevent peace at all costs, even at the cost of billions of innocent lives. To say that this is a high-stakes ordeal for our heroes is an understatement. And of course, that's not all it is. Since this is Timothy Zahn we're speaking of, there is much more to the story than is apparent early on. As an author, Zahn is a master of weaving together complex plots. Yet he is a master for a reason. He has the ability to work out the complicated narratives, and make it work. This second novel had everything a major Star Wars fan can want. There was a great deal more of Luke Skywalker and also Mara Jade (one of the most popular non-film characters). There was the roguish charm and brilliance of Han Solo, and the suave intellect of Lando Calrissian, as well as appearances by Talon Karrde, Wedge Antilles, and other movie and expanded universe favorites. Also fantastic was the treatment of Leia and Lando. Leia was finally shown displaying significant skills as a Jedi, which she hasn't done enough in the later stories. Lando was doing some important, brilliant stuff too. It seems that too often Lando is not used in these later tales, but Zahn remedied that, and gave Lando a truly epic part in this duology. On top of all of that, Zahn also finally paired off Mara Jade and Luke Skywalker. It was a wonderful ending to the Bantam publishing run of Star Wars. That I end my own Star Wars canon with those volume or Survivor's Quest is something which I readily admit. Hope and optimism are how I view the “galaxy far, far away”, not as the crapsack universe that Del Rey later made it. The only issue I had was that there was a typical, almost trite way that the the heroes were “forced” into a situation that solved a very worrisome and complex problem at the end, without them having to resort to any moral difficulties. This habit of stories, especially in comics and fantasy, to give the heroes an easy out, always annoyed me, as it does here. But that is the only criticism I can think of in regards to this book.As I said in the review of the previous volume, I repeat here. This book is masterful, a great tonic against the dark and edgy garbage in other SW books, and is well-worth a read.Highly Recommended.more
This book is just amazing and very fun to read. Its so romantic and excellent, its my most tattered and reread Star Wars book.more
Nice conclusion to the story began in 'Specter of the Past'. I especially enjoyed the deepening relationship of Luke and Mara, as well as the hints of where the star wars storyline might be headed in the future. This book does a lot of stuff with appearances vs. reality. Almost every storyline in this novel played with this theme. Mr. Zahn ultimately comes down on the side of knowing who to trust and then doing so despite the appearances.more
Will the real Thrawn please stand up? No, really. For past revelations and twisting the ethical questions even greyer, this gets five stars. For being a Thrawn book without any meaty Thrawn goodness, it loses one. I may arbitrarily fix that in the future. Sometime after a certain Norghi clone slaps a knife to my throat...more
Read all 5 reviews

Reviews

I realized once again, upon taking up the second book in this duology, that Timothy Zahn's Star Wars Expanded Universe story The Hand of Thrawn Duology should have been a trilogy. The second book, here reviewed, is the longest novel contributed by any author to the Star Wars universe. As Vision of the Future begins, several threads from the first book were picked up. Luke has gone after Mara Jade, to rescue her from the planet on which she has gone missing. Though he sees several possibilities for danger against loved ones, he follows a Force-vision, and goes in search of her. On separate tracks, Han Solo and Lando Calrissian, as well as Talon Karrde and Shada Du'kal, head off to find copies of the so-called Caamas Document in hopes of ending the bloodshed that has occurred, and preventing a war from beginning. Meanwhile, realizing that the only hope for the tiny remnants of the Empire to survive lies in peace with the New Republic, Grand Admiral Gilad Pellaeon battles internal forces that want to prevent peace at all costs, even at the cost of billions of innocent lives. To say that this is a high-stakes ordeal for our heroes is an understatement. And of course, that's not all it is. Since this is Timothy Zahn we're speaking of, there is much more to the story than is apparent early on. As an author, Zahn is a master of weaving together complex plots. Yet he is a master for a reason. He has the ability to work out the complicated narratives, and make it work. This second novel had everything a major Star Wars fan can want. There was a great deal more of Luke Skywalker and also Mara Jade (one of the most popular non-film characters). There was the roguish charm and brilliance of Han Solo, and the suave intellect of Lando Calrissian, as well as appearances by Talon Karrde, Wedge Antilles, and other movie and expanded universe favorites. Also fantastic was the treatment of Leia and Lando. Leia was finally shown displaying significant skills as a Jedi, which she hasn't done enough in the later stories. Lando was doing some important, brilliant stuff too. It seems that too often Lando is not used in these later tales, but Zahn remedied that, and gave Lando a truly epic part in this duology. On top of all of that, Zahn also finally paired off Mara Jade and Luke Skywalker. It was a wonderful ending to the Bantam publishing run of Star Wars. That I end my own Star Wars canon with those volume or Survivor's Quest is something which I readily admit. Hope and optimism are how I view the “galaxy far, far away”, not as the crapsack universe that Del Rey later made it. The only issue I had was that there was a typical, almost trite way that the the heroes were “forced” into a situation that solved a very worrisome and complex problem at the end, without them having to resort to any moral difficulties. This habit of stories, especially in comics and fantasy, to give the heroes an easy out, always annoyed me, as it does here. But that is the only criticism I can think of in regards to this book.As I said in the review of the previous volume, I repeat here. This book is masterful, a great tonic against the dark and edgy garbage in other SW books, and is well-worth a read.Highly Recommended.more
This book is just amazing and very fun to read. Its so romantic and excellent, its my most tattered and reread Star Wars book.more
Nice conclusion to the story began in 'Specter of the Past'. I especially enjoyed the deepening relationship of Luke and Mara, as well as the hints of where the star wars storyline might be headed in the future. This book does a lot of stuff with appearances vs. reality. Almost every storyline in this novel played with this theme. Mr. Zahn ultimately comes down on the side of knowing who to trust and then doing so despite the appearances.more
Will the real Thrawn please stand up? No, really. For past revelations and twisting the ethical questions even greyer, this gets five stars. For being a Thrawn book without any meaty Thrawn goodness, it loses one. I may arbitrarily fix that in the future. Sometime after a certain Norghi clone slaps a knife to my throat...more
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