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EL BESTSELLER NACIONAL
"Deslumbrante...Extraordinaria...García se revela como una nueva escritora m gica...Poderosa, visionaria...Totalmente original."
--Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times
"MARAVILLOSA...UNA NOVELA JOYA... La novela Soñar en cubano est escrita maravillosamente en un lenguaje que es sucesivamente l nguido y sensual, brusco y sorprendente. Como el lenguaje cristalino de Louise Erdrich, destilado de im genes que son nuevas en nuestra literature americana pero antiguas en esta región, Cristina García ha destilado una nueva lengua de los fragmentos salvados por medio del trastorno...Es [la] magia ordinaria en la novela de García, y el sentido propio de lirismo de sus personajes, los que le dan una buena acogida a su trabajo como la última señal de que la literatura americana tiene su propia descendiente hibrida de la escuela latinoamericana."
--Thulani Davis, The New York Times Book Review
"Conmovedora y perspicaz...Habla de una familia que est dividida política y geogr ficamente por la revolución cubana...[y] de las hendiduras que se abren en cada lado: En Cuba, entre una abuela que es una partidaria fervorosa de Castro y una hija que se refugia en un culto de santería afrocubano; en América, entre otra hija, agresivamente en contra de Castro y su propia hija, la artista punk y rebelde, que se burla de su obsesión...El realismo es exquisito."
--Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times
"Extraordinaria...Un tejido intrincado de eventos dram ticos con lo sobrenatural y lo cósmico...Evocadora y opulenta...Una narrativa rica y obsesionante, una voz nueva y excelente en la ficción contempor nea."
--Jackie Jones, San Francisco Chronicle
"Impresionante...Su historia se trata de tres generaciones de mujeres cubanas y sus reacciones por separado a la revolución. Su hazaña particular es la de contaria en un estilo tan caluroso y dulce como los 'aromas continuos de la vainilla y la almendra,' tan rítmico como la música de Beny Moré."
--Amelia Weiss, Time


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Published: Random House Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on Aug 3, 2011
ISBN: 9780307803412
List price: $11.99
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Interesting Story, but a cumbersome read. I found Dreaming in Cuban to be a cumbersome effort to read. Almost from the start I was beginning to lose track of the characters and I was beginning to think that I would need a score card to keep track of who was who. In this novel the author did create interesting scenes that centers around the Cuban family, and culture but there were so many loose ends when I finished reading the book that the overall story just didn't connect with me. It's not a terrible read, maybe just an entertaining story.read more
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A novel about some characters who were Cuban or Cuban emigres that is not bad in any identifiable ways, but just didn't grab my interest, so I gave up on it.read more
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It was kind of stressful reading this book. No one is happy with anyone for a long time and there are a lot of scary memories. But it was a good window into what it might be like to live in Cuba.read more
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Reviews

Interesting Story, but a cumbersome read. I found Dreaming in Cuban to be a cumbersome effort to read. Almost from the start I was beginning to lose track of the characters and I was beginning to think that I would need a score card to keep track of who was who. In this novel the author did create interesting scenes that centers around the Cuban family, and culture but there were so many loose ends when I finished reading the book that the overall story just didn't connect with me. It's not a terrible read, maybe just an entertaining story.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A novel about some characters who were Cuban or Cuban emigres that is not bad in any identifiable ways, but just didn't grab my interest, so I gave up on it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It was kind of stressful reading this book. No one is happy with anyone for a long time and there are a lot of scary memories. But it was a good window into what it might be like to live in Cuba.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Dreaming in Cuban — what a colorful book, it is saturated with color — sunlight — life — it is a dream. I started reading this during the week my mother passed away, read it during the wee hours I spent at her bedside during that long vigil in the Comfort Room — this beautiful book carried me through the toughest two weeks of my life and I was sad to come to its end, but I’m happy to know that I can read it again at any time, even if I pick it up and open to a random page and read it for a few minutes, this is a book that is easy to become immersed into and fall in love with all over again. As with many beloved books on my bookshelves, there are several dog-eared pages to revisit — the language is supple and written so lovingly — it has a sorrow that can break your heart and make it sing with joy at the same time. A classic beauty.
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Dreaming in Cuban is beautifully written and skillfully delves into the lives of several family members who hold opposing ideas about the Cuban revolution. It focuses on four major characters: Celia del Pino, her daughter Felicia who still lives in Cuba, her daughter Lourdes who has emigrated to New York City, and Lourdes' own daughter, Pilar. The multigenerational aspect is one of the most touching things about it, in my opinion.The problem for me was that the story didn't seem complete--I feel like we just barely skimmed the surface with these characters, sometimes going a little (or a lot) deeper, but only for a moment. The book is roughly 250 pages long, but for me, it wasn't enough to cover the story of four women from the 1930s to the 1980s, plus a handful of other relatives that get their own POV sections along the way. As it is, we get a lot of the characters' present-day emotions, but I would have loved to see more scenes actually played out rather than alluded to. There are gaps in the story between the years and the POV shifts, and I personally would have liked to see more of them filled in.The other thing that I found a little frustrating with this book is that some of the metaphors and references the characters make didn't seem to make sense, even after I stopped to think about them and figure it out. There are some parts where characters suddenly realize something about the moon, etc., and how it relates to their present situation, but the reason for this is not clear at all to me. Sometimes this happens in fiction and I just go with it, but in this book, for some reason, it served to jolt me out of the narrative and ended up interrupting the flow.With that said, there are many scenes that are very powerful and haunting, particularly in Celia's story. Cristina Garcia lets certain parts of the characters' pasts emerge slowly and reveals them at precisely the right time, which I love in a book.
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Dreaming in Cuba chronicles the lives of three generation of Cuban women in one family split between Cuba and the USA. Each of the main characters have significant emotional and psychological challenges and much of the book is spent exploring these and gradually revealing the problems that each has had to face in their life time. I thought this book was well written and the characters were engaging - especially Cecilia and Lourdes. However, I felt that the book failed to paint a picture of everyday Cuban life - perhaps because the writter has spent her adult life in the US. The descriptions of life in New York were on the whole more convincing. The author claims that the Cuban revolution is central to the book but this was not apparant to me. Two of the main characters do have very strong (fanatical) and irreconciable opinions about "el Lieder". However, aside from this, the book does not have a great deal to say about the revoluation and focusses more on the inner lives and losses of the main characters. The one Cuban issue which it does focus on in some details is the Santeria religion.
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