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The essential philosophical writings of one of the twentieth century’s most influential writers are now gathered into a single volume with an introduction and afterword by the celebrated writer and publisher Roberto Calasso.

Illness set him free to write a series of philosophical fragments: some narratives, some single images, some parables. These “aphorisms” appeared, sometimes with a few words changed, in other writings—some of them as posthumous fragments published only after Kafka’s death in 1924. While working on K., his major book on Kafka, in the Bodleian Library, Roberto Calasso realized that the Zürau aphorisms, each written on a separate slip of very thin paper, numbered but unbound, represented something unique in Kafka’s opus—a work whose form he had created simultaneously with its content.

The notebooks, freshly translated and laid out as Kafka had intended, are a distillation of Kafka at his most powerful and enigmatic. This lost jewel provides the reader with a fresh perspective on the collective work of a genius.
Published: Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780307561398
List price: $11.99
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Philosophy and Literature do not interact as often in modern times. Novelists spend more time trying to be clever and Philosophers reinterpreting earlier canonical works instead of thinking up new ideas. Franz Kafka, however, was interested in Hasidism. A certain contemplation of human nature is found in all of his books. This leads one to think that a slim volume of Philosophical musing by Kafka would be a great find. Taken from the Octavo Notebooks, and compiled together in order, these are the source of many of the most famous quotes by Kafka. Most of thesemore

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Philosophy and Literature do not interact as often in modern times. Novelists spend more time trying to be clever and Philosophers reinterpreting earlier canonical works instead of thinking up new ideas. Franz Kafka, however, was interested in Hasidism. A certain contemplation of human nature is found in all of his books. This leads one to think that a slim volume of Philosophical musing by Kafka would be a great find. Taken from the Octavo Notebooks, and compiled together in order, these are the source of many of the most famous quotes by Kafka. Most of thesemore
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