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Sense and Sensibility is one of the best loved of Jane Austen's novels, populated by great comic creations like Mrs. Jennings, the unscrupulous cad Willoughby, and guileless and artful women. As ever, Austen suffuses her work with great ironic observation and tremendous wit, producing a masterpiece of romantic entanglement that time and a very different set of mores cannot diminish.

Sense and Sensibility was the first of Jane Austen's novels to be published, coming out in 1811. It had a long gestation, beginning as Elinor and Marianne, an epistolary novel that Austen wrote in the 1790s. The novel centers on the sisters Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, who are forced to leave their home with their mother and younger sister, Margaret, and move in reduced circumstances to the West of England. Elinor, the sensible sister, and Marianne, the overimaginative romantic, must rely on a good marriage as a means of support. As their excellent schemes are intruded upon, Austen subtly explores the marriage game of her times, as both sense and sensibility affect the sisters' chances of happiness and comfort.
Published: Random House Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on Nov 1, 2000
ISBN: 9780679641131
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Wonderful gentle humor and romance! Austen has a great understanding of human nature and the society of her times.read more
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I found the characters to somewhat self-absorbed and a bit silly. I couldn't empathise or feel any real emotion for their situations nor did I really care what happened to them.

And not even the gentlemen could sway me on this one! Just a bit disappointing.read more
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I have always loved Sense and Sensibility best out of all of Jane Austen's novels, no doubt partly because it features the three Dashwood sisters (however invisible young Margaret may be), and I am one of three sisters myself. This tale of sensible Elinor and romantic Marianne, whose differing approaches to life and love are tested throughout the book, features the same sort of contest between desire and duty that gives Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre such power. It is a fitting tribute to Austen's powers as a writer, that although Elinor's "sense" is clearly meant to triumph, Marianne's "sensibility" is portrayed with such loving fondness.The story of a family of dependent women, whose fate is entirely in the hands of their male relatives, I have always found Sense and Sensibility to contain some of Austen's sharpest social criticism. The Dashwood women find themselves unwelcome guests in their own home when John Dashwood inherits the estate at Norland, and are only saved from the unpleasantness of the horrible Fanny by the kindness of Mrs. Dashwood's (male) cousin, Sir John Middleton. I have always found it fascinating that while Austen clearly endorses the more passive role that Elinor stakes out for herself, vis-a-vis romance, she simultaneously offers a very pointed critique of the enforced passivity of women, when it comes to economic activities and inheritance law.In the end though, for all its philosophical framework and subtle social commentary, Sense an Sensibility is most successful because Austen understands the complicated relations between women, particularly the bond between sisters.read more
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Sense and Sensibility tells the story of the two Dashwood sisters, Elinor and Marianne. Elinor, who embodies "sense", appears cool and reserved but secretly yearns for love. Marianne, who represents "sensibility", is unrestrained in her passions and unafraid to defy social conventions. The novel follows the two sisters as they navigate the pleasures and disappointments of love.I'll make no bones about it: I love me some Jane Austen. She is my go-to author for historical fiction and regency romances. I adore every thing that Austen has written, and Sense and Sensibility is no exception. The quality of writing, like all of Austen's works, is superb, and the characters are intelligent and engaging. Elinor and Marianne, especially, are strong characters that I couldn't help but love. I found myself smiling, sighing, crying, and laughing over the ups and downs of their relationships. Sense and Sensibility is a delightful read, and I can't recommend this book enough. I'd like to end my review with this quote from another favorite author:"Jane Austen is the pinnacle to which all other authors aspire."- J.K. Rowlingread more
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Ms. Austen tells an engaging tale and illustrates two very different ways of conducting oneself in the society of her time. While Marianne is engaging and not afraid to let the whole world know how she feels about everything, Elinor's story makes the case for observing the mores of the time. Some would say Elinor doesn't fully "feel" her joys and heartaches, but I think the story does a good job of showing just how detrimental to herself Marianne's excesses are. I really liked, however, how kind and loving Elinor is to both her mother and sister. She disagrees with their emotional excesses, but it doesn't separate her from them, or even cause her to blame them for the burdens they require her to shoulder.read more
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At this point I feel like I could easily write a computer program to write a passable Austen novel. Sure, she's droll and she invented an entire genre; she made social commentary where social commentary was otherwise essentially impossible for someone of her gender and station.I'm just kind of done with Austen. Engagements and secret affairs and dances and going to London during the season. Families full of daughters. Country estates. All good. All well-written. All in all an easy and quick read. The good guy generally wins. The good girl always does. The good girl then serves to deliver slightly heavy-handed moral allegory. Not that the morals are in any way not those that we should strive for--it's just a bit of a pretty picture.Highlights include the adolescent pleasure that the emotional middle daughter Marianne takes in the intensity of her deepest heartbreak, coming down with the inevitable serious fever after distraught, long, solo walks in wet long grass, moping in an estate's chintzy, teen-pathos-eliciting, faux-Grecian 'temple.' Sir John Middleton with his sherry-fueled grins and hunting dogs makes a gorgeous caricature of the jolly English landed gentry. Unlike in Pride and Prejudice, however, Austen's jibes at the banal conceit of certain characters lack the subtlety that her later novels have. Funny, yes, biting, still, but so obvious as to be somewhat dulled in their impact. But, in its defense, the book's characters, at least some of them, are flawed in some appealing ways: Elinor's holier than thou moralizing, their mother's mawkish mothery-ness, and Willoughby's--well, I'll leave it to you to find out about Willoughby.read more
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I used to like this, but the last time I reread it, it seemed to me that Austen let the two best characters marry the wrong people, when they should have married each other.read more
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you will find underlying themes of this title in the book.read more
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Reading this has made me think that school teachers do Austen a disservice but generally insisting on teaching Pride and Prejudice - allegedly her best book. It means that, unless you are absolutely convinced by Pride and Prejudice, you are unlikely to pick up any of her other works.Sense and Sensibility longer, lacks the immediately engaging opening line, and some ways suffers from an excess of exposition. Having said that, after the first 50 or so pages, I found it hard to put down and thoroughly enjoyed it.Despite a great abundance in female characters who consantly talk to each other, though, I am not sure it passes the Bechdel test.read more
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This is the story of two very different sisters: Elinor is a sensible (yet secretly passionate) young woman who must continuously reign in the wild passions of her mother and sisters - especially Marianne whose head is filled with romantic notions of one-true-love and tragedy. When their father suddenly dies with their newly-acquired estate entailed away to their half-brother John, the sisters are left destitute. John and his wife Fanny descend upon the mourning family within a fortnight and make the sisters and mother feel like unwelcome guests in their beloved home. Elinor soon forms an attachment with Fanny's brother Edward, but Fanny doesn't approve of Elinor's lack-of-fortune-or-name. So the family moves away to a cottage, leaving Edward behind. Poor Elinor must struggle with her own worries about Edward while at the same time monitoring the expensive of the house and trying to reign in the wild, all-consuming attachment of Marianne to the dashing young Willoughby. The romantic hopes of both girls spiral downwards as more and more obstacles appear. I love this story because I've always admired Elinor for both her passion and her ability to handle all problems that come her way. I also admire Colonel Brandon for his devotion to Marianne despite her ecstatic preference for the younger, handsomer, and less reserved Willoughby. This time around, I also really appreciated Marianne's character. Her youthful ideas about love were cute - and realistic for many girls of 16. :) Her development throughout the story was extraordinary. I loved the way she slowly, cluelessly, began to understand the world around her. I don't admire her, but I think she's cute and very funny. And, frankly, a more interesting character than Elinor (due to her development-of-character).To be honest, this book is just as much a favorite as Pride and Prejudice. Yes. That is right. I ADMIT that I like this book just as much (possibly a little more) than the beloved P&P.read more
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Two sisters experience the trials and tribulations of love.Sense and Sensibility was Jane Austen's first published novel. It contains all the elements that have made her such an enduring literary figure: well-drawn characters, elegant prose, nice romantic tension and sheer readability. Though not as well-liked as Pride and Prejudice, it's a wonderful novel capable of standing tall on its own merits.Austen employs a fairly standard structure here: she presents the two sisters, Elinor and Marianne, as embodiments of particular worldviews. Elinor has a great deal of sense; she's practical, down-to-earth and considerate of others. Marianne is mostly concerned with what the world can do for her; she's passionate, articulate, and throughly committed to living life her way. Austen uses the novel's events to soften each sister's character, bringing them both to a middle point at which Elinor has gained some passion and Marianne has gained some sense.These events are primarily romantic and, as is Austen's usual wont, there are problems aplenty. The atmosphere is always rife with tension as both sisters discover and deal with terrible truths about their suitors. The book can be read as a simple, literary romance novel, filled with the usual sorts of mistakes and moments of forgiveness.This is far from a one-dimmensional novel, though. One can easily delve deeper. Personally, I found that Austen did some interesting things with the whole idea of self-control. As the characters live in a very formal, polite society, it's often impossible for them to say what they really think. This leads to some wonderful dialogue as each character dances around their true meaning, finding some way to express themselves without breaking any social rules or being untrue to themselves. This results in some absolutely hilarious moments, and not a few heartbreaking ones.Overall, this is most certainly worth your time. Recommended.read more
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I didn't find Elinor Dashwood quite as appealing as Elizabeth Bennet (Pride and Prejudice) or as funny as Emma Woodhouse (Emma) and would have to say, therefore, that I liked this book a bit less than those two. On the other hand, Austen's tongue in cheek comments about the unpleasant characters in the novel were delicious.Another recommended novel.read more
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I enjoyed this book as much as I alawys enjoy Austen. A perfect ending as usual.read more
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I finally made it through Sense and Sensibility, but I must say it was quite a struggle. Jane Austen has a wonderful way with words, but I think it is safe to say that I grew to hate just about every character in the novel by the end. Elinor - the sense of the operation, was prim, proper dull and boring. Marianne - aka sensibility, was the extreme opposite of Elinor and I was praying she would be struck by a runaway horse and buggy within moments of being introduced to her, but sadly this was not to occur. The remaining women were primarily gossip junkies stalking the countryside for their next fix. The men of Sense and Sensibility not much better with the exception of Mr. Palmer. Palmer had the good sense to hide in the background and ignore the whole lot. I may give Austen another shot, but this reader needs a little time away.read more
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I really don't get why ppl like this book so much T_____T among the five Austen books I've read, I find it very dull indeed T_____T it's so lengthy, elaborative more than needed, and nothing's really going on at all. It renders me no emotions whatsoever with any of the characters.read more
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Sense and Sensibility illustrates well the old saying "appearances can be deceiving." Sensible Elinor appears to feel things less deeply than passionate Marianne, who pursues what she admires and avoids what she does not with equal zeal. However, in allowing her feelings to govern her behavior, Marianne is insensitive to the feelings of others, while Elinor, by doing what is expected of her in social situations, suffers all the more. Not only does Elinor do the right thing even when it is difficult and painful, she does it for the right reasons. I'm glad for Elinor's sake that she ends up with the man she loves. I can't help thinking, though, that she deserves a better man than Edward, and I find myself agreeing with many of her friends and relations that Colonel Brandon would have been a good match for her.read more
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For those who don’t know, Sense and Sensibility is the story of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne. The main focus is on Elinor, the older one. She’s rational, composed, intelligent and feels responsible for everything/one. Marianne seems to be her exact opposite – passionate, outspoken, spontaneous. Both fall in love, Elinor with Edward Ferrars and Marianne with John Willoughby. Of course, that isn’t the end of the story yet.Sense and Sensibility is my favourite Austen book - it's just amazing. Totally love it.read more
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Well, what can one say about Sense and Sensibility? Some will argue that this is not Jane Austen's best work, but still a great introduction to her writing. Indeed, Sense and Sensibility comes across as a little "too happy" - especially in light of other works such as Persuasion (which was her last novel). Still, S&S is beautiful and fun and atmospheric and true to form. One cannot help but feel transported to that space and time where women gossiped all day long about dresses and suitors while men dwelled with questions of honor and inheritance and what not. I love it. And, there is always Mr. Darcy!read more
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Thus far, my favorite Austen novel. Her prose rendered my eyes glued to the pages.read more
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Dreadfully, painfully dull - Penguin has released a book called 'Twitterature: The World's Greatest Books Retold Through Twitter', which includes 'Sense and Sensibility' and is able to finally makes sense and enjoyment of what is otherwise a heap of pointless verbiage. I recommend that version, unless you enjoy books where nothing happens, with characters whose insipidity is likely to have delayed the women's movement by at least 20 years.read more
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Katie Warman18th birthday present from Sylvia20-9-97(as it seems was Emma as well)read more
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I've actually already read this book, but I think it's my favorite Jane Austen, so I decided to read it again. Or at least it used to be my favorite. On rereading it, I think Emma or Persuasion might have the edge. But it's still very good. I'm not sure I understood all of Austen's semi-snide comments on human behaviour as a teenager.read more
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Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen Bethany House Publishers, Minneapolis (Minnesota), 2010I received a free copy of this book from Bethany House Publisher Sense and Sensibility is the first published book of Jane Austen; next year is the anniversary: 200 years. A book without age and wrinkles; full of wits, surprises, change of scenes and characters described inside their soul (Does Jane Austen describe the psychology of the characters? No, we're lucky, Freud and friends not yet born!). A tale of two sisters opposite until the end of the book. Elinor and Marianne, following different paths, at last find love and happiness. The themes of Sense and Sensibility are the conjectures of the soul and concealed feeling, rational (Elinor) and irrational (Marianne). At the turn of the century, Jane Austen presents old and new cultural movement: classicism and romanticism. The first as Elinor with judgment and moderation, the second as Marianne with extravagance and imagination. Within the other characters I liked Willoughby: he follows the evil's path whom 'had led him likewise to punishment' (p. 295), and Willoughby also is the man who is forgiven by Elinor.This edition comes with notes about historical anecdotes, unscientific ranking of the characters, themes of faith relate to Austen's life and references from Sense and Sensibility's movies (I like these notes!). It seems another book to take to school; I don't think so: Sense and Sensibility is not so boring, take it in your everyday life.Sense and Sensibility is a classic book, or as written by Italo Calvino 'A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say' (the translation in mine).read more
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Not very momorable work.read more
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This is my most favorite of Jane Austen's books... The way people used to word themselves - I crave to have been living then just to hear such language. The movie with Hugh Grant and Emma Thompson is my most favorite movie of all times.read more
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*Warning: some spoilers*At the ages of 19 and 17 respectively, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood lose their father – and their prosperity. With no financial support from their elder stepbrother, the Miss Dashwoods, their mother, and their younger sister retreat to live in a cottage on the estate of Mrs. Dashwood’s cousin. Prudent and practical Elinor faces the reality of their situation – and considers how it stands in the way of her love for Edward Ferrars while impulsive and passionate Marianne swings from despairing over their new situation to rapidly falling in love with the dashing John Willoughby. But, as Shakespeare notes and the Miss Dashwoods soon learn, the course of true love never did run smooth….I’ve often said that picking a favorite Jane Austen novel is like picking a favorite vital organ - an impossible task. But whenever I try to narrow it down, it is inevitably Emma and Sense and Sensibility at the top of the list, duking it out. In fact, on re-reading Sense and Sensibility, I realized that I had forgotten just how much I enjoy this particular Austen novel. There are some wonderfully classic moments such as Fanny talking John out of giving his sisters any financial assistance despite his deathbed promise to his father; the awkward situation Edward finds himself in when he walks into a room with both Elinor and Lucy present; and the absurd comedy of confusion that occurs when Mrs. Jennings thinks she overhears Colonel Brandon proposing to Elinor while Elinor thinks Mrs. Jennings perfectly comprehends that Colonel Brandon has offered Edward a living. Furthermore, the characters in this novel are simply wonderful. Yes, Marianne is a bit obnoxious in the beginning but she grows as a person by the end and one hopes she will continue on this path. I absolutely love Elinor – she may not be as an exciting a character as possible, but when it comes down to it, she is exactly the sort of person one would want to be friends with in real life. (And I should note that I feel as though Sense and Sensibility is really her book as we see more from her perspective and are privy to more of her inner thoughts than Marianne's). The minor characters are all delightfully quirky – whether it’s the ridiculously snobby Mrs. Ferrars, the gossipy and teasing Mrs. Jennings and Sir John, the exaggeratedly elegant Lady Middleton, the affected Robert Ferrars, Miss Steele and her obsession with beaus, the manipulative and ultimately false Lucy, etc.The ending, while perfectly satisfactory, is a bit disappointing just because I hate to leave these wonderful characters and know no more about their lives. It really feels like I am leaving behind old friends. One note on the audio version with Juliet Stevenson: She does the voices for individual characters well but when she simply narrates or does Elinor's voice, she is too placid for my taste. (In my opinion, she sounds like she wants to put someone to sleep at these times). This is certainly not an awful audio narration, but it’s not the best one either.read more
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Elinor and Marianne Dashwood are two young sisters who fall in love with men who seem suitable to their characters. Elinor is very sensible and Marianne is more of a fun loving sort. But things don't always turn out as they should. Or do they? Jane Austen writes of a society and class where protocol is often strictly followed, where people don't always speak their minds, where people of a certain class are expected to marry someone of their own class, and money is of great importance. So often in this story, we see people depending on money inherited from their family, and expecting to live up to the standards of their class without having to go out and earn a living. This seems to lead to a lot of unhappiness because people end up marrying for money and status. I think people who make their own way in life and marry who they want will often find themselves to be much happier. This book has a lot going for it. Not only is this book a great work of fiction, but it is also a great study of class, money, happiness, and personalities.read more
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As can always be expected from Jane Austen novels, Sense and Sensibility is filled with many memorable multi-dimensional characters. Readers' hearts will go out to the two Dashwood sisters, reasonable Elinor and passionate Marianne; laughs will be shared with the boisterous Mrs. Jennings; and sneers will be passed to the pages about the cad Willoughby. As one of Jane Austen's earliest works, Sense and Sensibility lacks the polish and ease of reading some of her other books (Pride and Prejudice, for example). However, her storytelling ability, fresh dialogue and wonderful characters reamain to leave this book a true classic, beloved by generation after generation.read more
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Pure Austen, this story of two sisters and their different approaches to family, fortune and romance echoes her other works, but also carries a few surprises. Within the very claustrophobic world of Austen’s late 18th-early 19th century upper/middle class English world, we see an absolute universe of character. Instead of traveling elsewhere in her stories, she simply goes deep. In this novel, she analyzes the differences and relative merits of the sensible and the emotional approaches to life, and along the way provides sufficient color, romance, adventure and dry humor to entertain a contemporary reader with an interest in finely drawn characters.read more
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The tale of two sisters - the elder (Elinor) is very sensible, rational, not prone to great tides of emotion, while the younger (Marianne) is much more melodramatic, given to those classic period-drama swoons and faintings - and their misadventures in love. Of course there is a complicated family situation, evil sisters-in-law, conniving rivals, fickle suitors... all the classic elements, as well as a happy ending. Austen has a very impressive skill for constructing romantic cliff-hangers.What impressed me (and I do not remember being impressed by this in Pride & Prejudice when I read it seven years ago) were the beautiful turns of phrase. "The shades of his mind" and "truth was less violently outraged than usual" were my favourites, along with "she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition"! I also took great delight at the eventual fate of the main villain - really the only end for him, but unexpected when it came. Austen's lampooning of the insipid, rude, selfish bystanders among the characters is also distinctly enjoyable.I have my objections too. Elinor's sense apparently prevents her from ever suffering any outburts of emotion, well beyond the limits of the patience of anyone I know! Tempestuous Marianne suffers physically several times (a sprained ankle and a number of colds), while Elinor apparently has one of those miraculously healthy constitutions. Marianne has a relevation post-illness and repents of her former ways, and pre-revelation is just a bit too... dramatic. Like an opera diva. In addition, the speeches (particularly between the sisters) come across as overly lengthy, oratorial and therefore somewhat out of place. Maybe I am doing Austen an injustice and sisters really did speak like that once.By the way, I should mention I was reading a Folio Edition - beautiful red cloth spine and illustrations. And surprisingly, quite well designed for reading as well as just looking at!read more
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Wonderful gentle humor and romance! Austen has a great understanding of human nature and the society of her times.
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I found the characters to somewhat self-absorbed and a bit silly. I couldn't empathise or feel any real emotion for their situations nor did I really care what happened to them.

And not even the gentlemen could sway me on this one! Just a bit disappointing.
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I have always loved Sense and Sensibility best out of all of Jane Austen's novels, no doubt partly because it features the three Dashwood sisters (however invisible young Margaret may be), and I am one of three sisters myself. This tale of sensible Elinor and romantic Marianne, whose differing approaches to life and love are tested throughout the book, features the same sort of contest between desire and duty that gives Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre such power. It is a fitting tribute to Austen's powers as a writer, that although Elinor's "sense" is clearly meant to triumph, Marianne's "sensibility" is portrayed with such loving fondness.The story of a family of dependent women, whose fate is entirely in the hands of their male relatives, I have always found Sense and Sensibility to contain some of Austen's sharpest social criticism. The Dashwood women find themselves unwelcome guests in their own home when John Dashwood inherits the estate at Norland, and are only saved from the unpleasantness of the horrible Fanny by the kindness of Mrs. Dashwood's (male) cousin, Sir John Middleton. I have always found it fascinating that while Austen clearly endorses the more passive role that Elinor stakes out for herself, vis-a-vis romance, she simultaneously offers a very pointed critique of the enforced passivity of women, when it comes to economic activities and inheritance law.In the end though, for all its philosophical framework and subtle social commentary, Sense an Sensibility is most successful because Austen understands the complicated relations between women, particularly the bond between sisters.
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Sense and Sensibility tells the story of the two Dashwood sisters, Elinor and Marianne. Elinor, who embodies "sense", appears cool and reserved but secretly yearns for love. Marianne, who represents "sensibility", is unrestrained in her passions and unafraid to defy social conventions. The novel follows the two sisters as they navigate the pleasures and disappointments of love.I'll make no bones about it: I love me some Jane Austen. She is my go-to author for historical fiction and regency romances. I adore every thing that Austen has written, and Sense and Sensibility is no exception. The quality of writing, like all of Austen's works, is superb, and the characters are intelligent and engaging. Elinor and Marianne, especially, are strong characters that I couldn't help but love. I found myself smiling, sighing, crying, and laughing over the ups and downs of their relationships. Sense and Sensibility is a delightful read, and I can't recommend this book enough. I'd like to end my review with this quote from another favorite author:"Jane Austen is the pinnacle to which all other authors aspire."- J.K. Rowling
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Ms. Austen tells an engaging tale and illustrates two very different ways of conducting oneself in the society of her time. While Marianne is engaging and not afraid to let the whole world know how she feels about everything, Elinor's story makes the case for observing the mores of the time. Some would say Elinor doesn't fully "feel" her joys and heartaches, but I think the story does a good job of showing just how detrimental to herself Marianne's excesses are. I really liked, however, how kind and loving Elinor is to both her mother and sister. She disagrees with their emotional excesses, but it doesn't separate her from them, or even cause her to blame them for the burdens they require her to shoulder.
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At this point I feel like I could easily write a computer program to write a passable Austen novel. Sure, she's droll and she invented an entire genre; she made social commentary where social commentary was otherwise essentially impossible for someone of her gender and station.I'm just kind of done with Austen. Engagements and secret affairs and dances and going to London during the season. Families full of daughters. Country estates. All good. All well-written. All in all an easy and quick read. The good guy generally wins. The good girl always does. The good girl then serves to deliver slightly heavy-handed moral allegory. Not that the morals are in any way not those that we should strive for--it's just a bit of a pretty picture.Highlights include the adolescent pleasure that the emotional middle daughter Marianne takes in the intensity of her deepest heartbreak, coming down with the inevitable serious fever after distraught, long, solo walks in wet long grass, moping in an estate's chintzy, teen-pathos-eliciting, faux-Grecian 'temple.' Sir John Middleton with his sherry-fueled grins and hunting dogs makes a gorgeous caricature of the jolly English landed gentry. Unlike in Pride and Prejudice, however, Austen's jibes at the banal conceit of certain characters lack the subtlety that her later novels have. Funny, yes, biting, still, but so obvious as to be somewhat dulled in their impact. But, in its defense, the book's characters, at least some of them, are flawed in some appealing ways: Elinor's holier than thou moralizing, their mother's mawkish mothery-ness, and Willoughby's--well, I'll leave it to you to find out about Willoughby.
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I used to like this, but the last time I reread it, it seemed to me that Austen let the two best characters marry the wrong people, when they should have married each other.
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you will find underlying themes of this title in the book.
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Reading this has made me think that school teachers do Austen a disservice but generally insisting on teaching Pride and Prejudice - allegedly her best book. It means that, unless you are absolutely convinced by Pride and Prejudice, you are unlikely to pick up any of her other works.Sense and Sensibility longer, lacks the immediately engaging opening line, and some ways suffers from an excess of exposition. Having said that, after the first 50 or so pages, I found it hard to put down and thoroughly enjoyed it.Despite a great abundance in female characters who consantly talk to each other, though, I am not sure it passes the Bechdel test.
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This is the story of two very different sisters: Elinor is a sensible (yet secretly passionate) young woman who must continuously reign in the wild passions of her mother and sisters - especially Marianne whose head is filled with romantic notions of one-true-love and tragedy. When their father suddenly dies with their newly-acquired estate entailed away to their half-brother John, the sisters are left destitute. John and his wife Fanny descend upon the mourning family within a fortnight and make the sisters and mother feel like unwelcome guests in their beloved home. Elinor soon forms an attachment with Fanny's brother Edward, but Fanny doesn't approve of Elinor's lack-of-fortune-or-name. So the family moves away to a cottage, leaving Edward behind. Poor Elinor must struggle with her own worries about Edward while at the same time monitoring the expensive of the house and trying to reign in the wild, all-consuming attachment of Marianne to the dashing young Willoughby. The romantic hopes of both girls spiral downwards as more and more obstacles appear. I love this story because I've always admired Elinor for both her passion and her ability to handle all problems that come her way. I also admire Colonel Brandon for his devotion to Marianne despite her ecstatic preference for the younger, handsomer, and less reserved Willoughby. This time around, I also really appreciated Marianne's character. Her youthful ideas about love were cute - and realistic for many girls of 16. :) Her development throughout the story was extraordinary. I loved the way she slowly, cluelessly, began to understand the world around her. I don't admire her, but I think she's cute and very funny. And, frankly, a more interesting character than Elinor (due to her development-of-character).To be honest, this book is just as much a favorite as Pride and Prejudice. Yes. That is right. I ADMIT that I like this book just as much (possibly a little more) than the beloved P&P.
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Two sisters experience the trials and tribulations of love.Sense and Sensibility was Jane Austen's first published novel. It contains all the elements that have made her such an enduring literary figure: well-drawn characters, elegant prose, nice romantic tension and sheer readability. Though not as well-liked as Pride and Prejudice, it's a wonderful novel capable of standing tall on its own merits.Austen employs a fairly standard structure here: she presents the two sisters, Elinor and Marianne, as embodiments of particular worldviews. Elinor has a great deal of sense; she's practical, down-to-earth and considerate of others. Marianne is mostly concerned with what the world can do for her; she's passionate, articulate, and throughly committed to living life her way. Austen uses the novel's events to soften each sister's character, bringing them both to a middle point at which Elinor has gained some passion and Marianne has gained some sense.These events are primarily romantic and, as is Austen's usual wont, there are problems aplenty. The atmosphere is always rife with tension as both sisters discover and deal with terrible truths about their suitors. The book can be read as a simple, literary romance novel, filled with the usual sorts of mistakes and moments of forgiveness.This is far from a one-dimmensional novel, though. One can easily delve deeper. Personally, I found that Austen did some interesting things with the whole idea of self-control. As the characters live in a very formal, polite society, it's often impossible for them to say what they really think. This leads to some wonderful dialogue as each character dances around their true meaning, finding some way to express themselves without breaking any social rules or being untrue to themselves. This results in some absolutely hilarious moments, and not a few heartbreaking ones.Overall, this is most certainly worth your time. Recommended.
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I didn't find Elinor Dashwood quite as appealing as Elizabeth Bennet (Pride and Prejudice) or as funny as Emma Woodhouse (Emma) and would have to say, therefore, that I liked this book a bit less than those two. On the other hand, Austen's tongue in cheek comments about the unpleasant characters in the novel were delicious.Another recommended novel.
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I enjoyed this book as much as I alawys enjoy Austen. A perfect ending as usual.
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I finally made it through Sense and Sensibility, but I must say it was quite a struggle. Jane Austen has a wonderful way with words, but I think it is safe to say that I grew to hate just about every character in the novel by the end. Elinor - the sense of the operation, was prim, proper dull and boring. Marianne - aka sensibility, was the extreme opposite of Elinor and I was praying she would be struck by a runaway horse and buggy within moments of being introduced to her, but sadly this was not to occur. The remaining women were primarily gossip junkies stalking the countryside for their next fix. The men of Sense and Sensibility not much better with the exception of Mr. Palmer. Palmer had the good sense to hide in the background and ignore the whole lot. I may give Austen another shot, but this reader needs a little time away.
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I really don't get why ppl like this book so much T_____T among the five Austen books I've read, I find it very dull indeed T_____T it's so lengthy, elaborative more than needed, and nothing's really going on at all. It renders me no emotions whatsoever with any of the characters.
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Sense and Sensibility illustrates well the old saying "appearances can be deceiving." Sensible Elinor appears to feel things less deeply than passionate Marianne, who pursues what she admires and avoids what she does not with equal zeal. However, in allowing her feelings to govern her behavior, Marianne is insensitive to the feelings of others, while Elinor, by doing what is expected of her in social situations, suffers all the more. Not only does Elinor do the right thing even when it is difficult and painful, she does it for the right reasons. I'm glad for Elinor's sake that she ends up with the man she loves. I can't help thinking, though, that she deserves a better man than Edward, and I find myself agreeing with many of her friends and relations that Colonel Brandon would have been a good match for her.
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For those who don’t know, Sense and Sensibility is the story of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne. The main focus is on Elinor, the older one. She’s rational, composed, intelligent and feels responsible for everything/one. Marianne seems to be her exact opposite – passionate, outspoken, spontaneous. Both fall in love, Elinor with Edward Ferrars and Marianne with John Willoughby. Of course, that isn’t the end of the story yet.Sense and Sensibility is my favourite Austen book - it's just amazing. Totally love it.
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Well, what can one say about Sense and Sensibility? Some will argue that this is not Jane Austen's best work, but still a great introduction to her writing. Indeed, Sense and Sensibility comes across as a little "too happy" - especially in light of other works such as Persuasion (which was her last novel). Still, S&S is beautiful and fun and atmospheric and true to form. One cannot help but feel transported to that space and time where women gossiped all day long about dresses and suitors while men dwelled with questions of honor and inheritance and what not. I love it. And, there is always Mr. Darcy!
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Thus far, my favorite Austen novel. Her prose rendered my eyes glued to the pages.
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Dreadfully, painfully dull - Penguin has released a book called 'Twitterature: The World's Greatest Books Retold Through Twitter', which includes 'Sense and Sensibility' and is able to finally makes sense and enjoyment of what is otherwise a heap of pointless verbiage. I recommend that version, unless you enjoy books where nothing happens, with characters whose insipidity is likely to have delayed the women's movement by at least 20 years.
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Katie Warman18th birthday present from Sylvia20-9-97(as it seems was Emma as well)
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I've actually already read this book, but I think it's my favorite Jane Austen, so I decided to read it again. Or at least it used to be my favorite. On rereading it, I think Emma or Persuasion might have the edge. But it's still very good. I'm not sure I understood all of Austen's semi-snide comments on human behaviour as a teenager.
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Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen Bethany House Publishers, Minneapolis (Minnesota), 2010I received a free copy of this book from Bethany House Publisher Sense and Sensibility is the first published book of Jane Austen; next year is the anniversary: 200 years. A book without age and wrinkles; full of wits, surprises, change of scenes and characters described inside their soul (Does Jane Austen describe the psychology of the characters? No, we're lucky, Freud and friends not yet born!). A tale of two sisters opposite until the end of the book. Elinor and Marianne, following different paths, at last find love and happiness. The themes of Sense and Sensibility are the conjectures of the soul and concealed feeling, rational (Elinor) and irrational (Marianne). At the turn of the century, Jane Austen presents old and new cultural movement: classicism and romanticism. The first as Elinor with judgment and moderation, the second as Marianne with extravagance and imagination. Within the other characters I liked Willoughby: he follows the evil's path whom 'had led him likewise to punishment' (p. 295), and Willoughby also is the man who is forgiven by Elinor.This edition comes with notes about historical anecdotes, unscientific ranking of the characters, themes of faith relate to Austen's life and references from Sense and Sensibility's movies (I like these notes!). It seems another book to take to school; I don't think so: Sense and Sensibility is not so boring, take it in your everyday life.Sense and Sensibility is a classic book, or as written by Italo Calvino 'A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say' (the translation in mine).
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Not very momorable work.
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This is my most favorite of Jane Austen's books... The way people used to word themselves - I crave to have been living then just to hear such language. The movie with Hugh Grant and Emma Thompson is my most favorite movie of all times.
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*Warning: some spoilers*At the ages of 19 and 17 respectively, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood lose their father – and their prosperity. With no financial support from their elder stepbrother, the Miss Dashwoods, their mother, and their younger sister retreat to live in a cottage on the estate of Mrs. Dashwood’s cousin. Prudent and practical Elinor faces the reality of their situation – and considers how it stands in the way of her love for Edward Ferrars while impulsive and passionate Marianne swings from despairing over their new situation to rapidly falling in love with the dashing John Willoughby. But, as Shakespeare notes and the Miss Dashwoods soon learn, the course of true love never did run smooth….I’ve often said that picking a favorite Jane Austen novel is like picking a favorite vital organ - an impossible task. But whenever I try to narrow it down, it is inevitably Emma and Sense and Sensibility at the top of the list, duking it out. In fact, on re-reading Sense and Sensibility, I realized that I had forgotten just how much I enjoy this particular Austen novel. There are some wonderfully classic moments such as Fanny talking John out of giving his sisters any financial assistance despite his deathbed promise to his father; the awkward situation Edward finds himself in when he walks into a room with both Elinor and Lucy present; and the absurd comedy of confusion that occurs when Mrs. Jennings thinks she overhears Colonel Brandon proposing to Elinor while Elinor thinks Mrs. Jennings perfectly comprehends that Colonel Brandon has offered Edward a living. Furthermore, the characters in this novel are simply wonderful. Yes, Marianne is a bit obnoxious in the beginning but she grows as a person by the end and one hopes she will continue on this path. I absolutely love Elinor – she may not be as an exciting a character as possible, but when it comes down to it, she is exactly the sort of person one would want to be friends with in real life. (And I should note that I feel as though Sense and Sensibility is really her book as we see more from her perspective and are privy to more of her inner thoughts than Marianne's). The minor characters are all delightfully quirky – whether it’s the ridiculously snobby Mrs. Ferrars, the gossipy and teasing Mrs. Jennings and Sir John, the exaggeratedly elegant Lady Middleton, the affected Robert Ferrars, Miss Steele and her obsession with beaus, the manipulative and ultimately false Lucy, etc.The ending, while perfectly satisfactory, is a bit disappointing just because I hate to leave these wonderful characters and know no more about their lives. It really feels like I am leaving behind old friends. One note on the audio version with Juliet Stevenson: She does the voices for individual characters well but when she simply narrates or does Elinor's voice, she is too placid for my taste. (In my opinion, she sounds like she wants to put someone to sleep at these times). This is certainly not an awful audio narration, but it’s not the best one either.
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Elinor and Marianne Dashwood are two young sisters who fall in love with men who seem suitable to their characters. Elinor is very sensible and Marianne is more of a fun loving sort. But things don't always turn out as they should. Or do they? Jane Austen writes of a society and class where protocol is often strictly followed, where people don't always speak their minds, where people of a certain class are expected to marry someone of their own class, and money is of great importance. So often in this story, we see people depending on money inherited from their family, and expecting to live up to the standards of their class without having to go out and earn a living. This seems to lead to a lot of unhappiness because people end up marrying for money and status. I think people who make their own way in life and marry who they want will often find themselves to be much happier. This book has a lot going for it. Not only is this book a great work of fiction, but it is also a great study of class, money, happiness, and personalities.
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As can always be expected from Jane Austen novels, Sense and Sensibility is filled with many memorable multi-dimensional characters. Readers' hearts will go out to the two Dashwood sisters, reasonable Elinor and passionate Marianne; laughs will be shared with the boisterous Mrs. Jennings; and sneers will be passed to the pages about the cad Willoughby. As one of Jane Austen's earliest works, Sense and Sensibility lacks the polish and ease of reading some of her other books (Pride and Prejudice, for example). However, her storytelling ability, fresh dialogue and wonderful characters reamain to leave this book a true classic, beloved by generation after generation.
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Pure Austen, this story of two sisters and their different approaches to family, fortune and romance echoes her other works, but also carries a few surprises. Within the very claustrophobic world of Austen’s late 18th-early 19th century upper/middle class English world, we see an absolute universe of character. Instead of traveling elsewhere in her stories, she simply goes deep. In this novel, she analyzes the differences and relative merits of the sensible and the emotional approaches to life, and along the way provides sufficient color, romance, adventure and dry humor to entertain a contemporary reader with an interest in finely drawn characters.
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The tale of two sisters - the elder (Elinor) is very sensible, rational, not prone to great tides of emotion, while the younger (Marianne) is much more melodramatic, given to those classic period-drama swoons and faintings - and their misadventures in love. Of course there is a complicated family situation, evil sisters-in-law, conniving rivals, fickle suitors... all the classic elements, as well as a happy ending. Austen has a very impressive skill for constructing romantic cliff-hangers.What impressed me (and I do not remember being impressed by this in Pride & Prejudice when I read it seven years ago) were the beautiful turns of phrase. "The shades of his mind" and "truth was less violently outraged than usual" were my favourites, along with "she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition"! I also took great delight at the eventual fate of the main villain - really the only end for him, but unexpected when it came. Austen's lampooning of the insipid, rude, selfish bystanders among the characters is also distinctly enjoyable.I have my objections too. Elinor's sense apparently prevents her from ever suffering any outburts of emotion, well beyond the limits of the patience of anyone I know! Tempestuous Marianne suffers physically several times (a sprained ankle and a number of colds), while Elinor apparently has one of those miraculously healthy constitutions. Marianne has a relevation post-illness and repents of her former ways, and pre-revelation is just a bit too... dramatic. Like an opera diva. In addition, the speeches (particularly between the sisters) come across as overly lengthy, oratorial and therefore somewhat out of place. Maybe I am doing Austen an injustice and sisters really did speak like that once.By the way, I should mention I was reading a Folio Edition - beautiful red cloth spine and illustrations. And surprisingly, quite well designed for reading as well as just looking at!
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