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From the American War of Independence to World War II, the history of the military combat marksman is one of indifference and cost cutting. Despite the proven effectiveness of the rifleman in battle, for most of the 20th century snipers were regarded as little more than paid assassins. It was not until the Vietnam War that the undeniable effectiveness of the sniper was fully appreciated by the military, and with the advent of the 21st century, the sniper has become one of the most vital battlefield specialists. Illustrated throughout with colour and black and white photographs, this chronological study of snipers details their evolution, training, weaponry and tactics. It also includes material from the author’s first hand interviews with the veteran snipers whose skills and extraordinary courage have made them the most greatly feared specialists in warfare.


From the Hardcover edition.
Published: Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9781849088756
List price: $7.95
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An extended account of a topic the author has previously treated in Elite 68 The Military Sniper since 1914. Both books overemphasize the World Wars to the detriment of recent developments, Curiously for a book dedicated to the killed Black Hawk Down snipers, it hardly treats modern US sniping and special forces.It highlights the interaction of technical innovations (gun, sighting, ammo) and tactical considerations (snipers within units, snipers as roaming specialists) as well as the repeated loss of experience of tacit knowledge in peacetime. Pegler divides his chapter chronologically by countries, this allows him to expand into an interesting treatment of Soviet snipers The chapters on British snipers are heavily influenced by personal recollections. French and non-Western snipers mostly appear in their roles as enemies. Given the memorable sniper episode in "Full Metal Jacket", I would have liked to read more about them. Snipers as a rich nation's high-tech warriors vs. snipers as a poor man's big weapon system. I recommend reading the shorter Elite title as it is better balanced.more

Reviews

An extended account of a topic the author has previously treated in Elite 68 The Military Sniper since 1914. Both books overemphasize the World Wars to the detriment of recent developments, Curiously for a book dedicated to the killed Black Hawk Down snipers, it hardly treats modern US sniping and special forces.It highlights the interaction of technical innovations (gun, sighting, ammo) and tactical considerations (snipers within units, snipers as roaming specialists) as well as the repeated loss of experience of tacit knowledge in peacetime. Pegler divides his chapter chronologically by countries, this allows him to expand into an interesting treatment of Soviet snipers The chapters on British snipers are heavily influenced by personal recollections. French and non-Western snipers mostly appear in their roles as enemies. Given the memorable sniper episode in "Full Metal Jacket", I would have liked to read more about them. Snipers as a rich nation's high-tech warriors vs. snipers as a poor man's big weapon system. I recommend reading the shorter Elite title as it is better balanced.more
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