This title is not available in our membership service

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible.

Request Title
Emma Forrest, a British journalist, was just twenty-two and living the fast life in New York City when she realized that her quirks had gone beyond eccentricity. In a cycle of loneliness, damaging relationships, and destructive behavior, she found herself in the chair of a slim, balding, and effortlessly optimistic psychiatrist—a man whose wisdom and humanity would wrench her from the dangerous tide after she tried to end her life. She was on the brink of drowning, but she was still working, still exploring, still writing, and she had also fallen deeply in love. One day, when Emma called to make an appointment with her psychiatrist, she found no one there. He had died, shockingly, at the age of fifty-three, leaving behind a young family. Reeling from the premature death of a man who had become her anchor after she turned up on his doorstep, she was adrift. And when her all-consuming romantic relationship also fell apart, Emma was forced to cling to the page for survival and regain her footing on her own terms.
   A modern-day fairy tale, Your Voice in My Head is a stunning memoir, clear-eyed and shot through with wit. In her unique voice, Emma Forrest explores the highs and lows of love and the heartbreak of loss.
Published: Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9781590514474
List price: $9.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Your Voice in My Head: A Memoir
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
People love this book, at least according to the back of the book jacket. While I am sure that Emma Forrest is a gifted writer, I could not connect at all with this memoir. Perhaps it is me - I've never really had to spend lots of time with people who were manic-depressive - and her particular brand of mental illness includes such weird (to me) allusions that I just didn't understand much of what was going on in her head. I also found it extremely sad that people actually have to live without hope - but as a person who finds my hope in Jesus Christ and his resurrection - maybe my inability to connect is to be expected.more
Emma Forrest’s memoir is a gut-wrenching read. It is an homage to her deceased psychiatrist and an attempt at understanding the failed relationship with her unidentifiable movie-star lover, but most of all it describes her self-mutilation and suicide attempt. However, it is the chapter describing a Shabbat service that is most rewarding as it provides a breakthrough for the author while at the same time uplifts the reader. More than just a confessional, Your Voice in My Head explores the psychological depths of an examined life and that warrants our attention.more
Going into this book, I didn't quite know what to expect. I haven't read a feminist depression memoir since grad school and to be honest I wasn't too hopeful about Emma Forrest. The thing that saved this book for me was her very well crafted sentences and the uncontrived way that she linked her themes together. I could tell that Forrest spent a good deal of time working on individual sentences and it shows. Also, it helped knowing that "GH" was Colin Ferrell from the get go. I didn't really see this as a hindrance to the story telling, but I get why she left him nameless.I also related to the time period in which this is all going on 2000-2009. Looking at events like the George Bush elections, than the Barrack election through the eyes of a manic depressive/cutter/serial celebrity dater was interesting to me. Near the end I was sort of torn over what this book was really about. In other words, would I have enjoyed this equally if I didn't know GH was Colin Ferrell? Probably not. Why should I care about Emma Forrest's story? What makes her case of manic depression special? In the end, I believe its her writing skill. The book was a also a bit on the short side with a huge font and the chapter sizes are somewhat short. I certainly finished the book interested in her story though and she gave me a genuine sense of what it was like to be in her shoes. I will seek out other works by her.more
I loved this book and wish it had never ended. It is one I possibly will buy just to be able to read it over and over again. The descriptions of the manic-depressive behaviors are sad but funny, as the author is able to use her wonderful descriptive way of writing to pull the reader in and feel the emotional upheaval that goes with this diagnosis.She doesn't name her beau, but I googled it and found out who it was that let her down so badly, and was amazed that this author was in the entertainment news for such a long time because of this romance. It was good to hear about life from her version of it rather than the gossip columns. I found myself laughing out loud, a rarity for me, in some places and yet sad for her when her beau dumps her. For an insight into Hollywood celebrities, and the behaviors of a writer who suffers from manic-depression, run out and buy this book. It is worth your time and your money.more
Your Voice in my Head is a candid, wrenching account of Forrest's descent into utter despair, self-mutilation, bulimia, and attempted suicide. She is young, a talented and successful writer, a London transplant living in New York; and she has realized that her "quirks had gone beyond eccentricity, past the warm waters of weird, to those cold, deep patches of sea where people lose their lives." (8) So begins her journey back to land. Thrown a lifeline by loving parents and an exceptional doctor of psychiatry, she grabs on; but her madness is not easily silenced.Ultimately, Forrest writes of life: great love, great dreams, great loss. Though her reality is scarred by depression and mania, she nonetheless writes with a sharp wit and is, by turns, even humourous. The continued appearance of water in her memoir is brilliant. "I feel the waters rising up around my heart. They don't stop. This is my last breath, this is my last heart. I'm searching frantically for an air pocket." (145)Ultimately, of course, only Emma can save herself. "Can I tell you what it's like to live inside Millais' painting of Ophelia? There are patches of water so warm. Drowning I can see the sky, the branches of trees hanging overhead. It's very beautiful. I will stay afloat for as long as I can." (202)Highly recommended to all who enjoy reading about the achievements and triumphs of real women. For anyone who has met depression face-to-face, Your Voice in My Head is not to be passed by.more
Read all 5 reviews

Reviews

People love this book, at least according to the back of the book jacket. While I am sure that Emma Forrest is a gifted writer, I could not connect at all with this memoir. Perhaps it is me - I've never really had to spend lots of time with people who were manic-depressive - and her particular brand of mental illness includes such weird (to me) allusions that I just didn't understand much of what was going on in her head. I also found it extremely sad that people actually have to live without hope - but as a person who finds my hope in Jesus Christ and his resurrection - maybe my inability to connect is to be expected.more
Emma Forrest’s memoir is a gut-wrenching read. It is an homage to her deceased psychiatrist and an attempt at understanding the failed relationship with her unidentifiable movie-star lover, but most of all it describes her self-mutilation and suicide attempt. However, it is the chapter describing a Shabbat service that is most rewarding as it provides a breakthrough for the author while at the same time uplifts the reader. More than just a confessional, Your Voice in My Head explores the psychological depths of an examined life and that warrants our attention.more
Going into this book, I didn't quite know what to expect. I haven't read a feminist depression memoir since grad school and to be honest I wasn't too hopeful about Emma Forrest. The thing that saved this book for me was her very well crafted sentences and the uncontrived way that she linked her themes together. I could tell that Forrest spent a good deal of time working on individual sentences and it shows. Also, it helped knowing that "GH" was Colin Ferrell from the get go. I didn't really see this as a hindrance to the story telling, but I get why she left him nameless.I also related to the time period in which this is all going on 2000-2009. Looking at events like the George Bush elections, than the Barrack election through the eyes of a manic depressive/cutter/serial celebrity dater was interesting to me. Near the end I was sort of torn over what this book was really about. In other words, would I have enjoyed this equally if I didn't know GH was Colin Ferrell? Probably not. Why should I care about Emma Forrest's story? What makes her case of manic depression special? In the end, I believe its her writing skill. The book was a also a bit on the short side with a huge font and the chapter sizes are somewhat short. I certainly finished the book interested in her story though and she gave me a genuine sense of what it was like to be in her shoes. I will seek out other works by her.more
I loved this book and wish it had never ended. It is one I possibly will buy just to be able to read it over and over again. The descriptions of the manic-depressive behaviors are sad but funny, as the author is able to use her wonderful descriptive way of writing to pull the reader in and feel the emotional upheaval that goes with this diagnosis.She doesn't name her beau, but I googled it and found out who it was that let her down so badly, and was amazed that this author was in the entertainment news for such a long time because of this romance. It was good to hear about life from her version of it rather than the gossip columns. I found myself laughing out loud, a rarity for me, in some places and yet sad for her when her beau dumps her. For an insight into Hollywood celebrities, and the behaviors of a writer who suffers from manic-depression, run out and buy this book. It is worth your time and your money.more
Your Voice in my Head is a candid, wrenching account of Forrest's descent into utter despair, self-mutilation, bulimia, and attempted suicide. She is young, a talented and successful writer, a London transplant living in New York; and she has realized that her "quirks had gone beyond eccentricity, past the warm waters of weird, to those cold, deep patches of sea where people lose their lives." (8) So begins her journey back to land. Thrown a lifeline by loving parents and an exceptional doctor of psychiatry, she grabs on; but her madness is not easily silenced.Ultimately, Forrest writes of life: great love, great dreams, great loss. Though her reality is scarred by depression and mania, she nonetheless writes with a sharp wit and is, by turns, even humourous. The continued appearance of water in her memoir is brilliant. "I feel the waters rising up around my heart. They don't stop. This is my last breath, this is my last heart. I'm searching frantically for an air pocket." (145)Ultimately, of course, only Emma can save herself. "Can I tell you what it's like to live inside Millais' painting of Ophelia? There are patches of water so warm. Drowning I can see the sky, the branches of trees hanging overhead. It's very beautiful. I will stay afloat for as long as I can." (202)Highly recommended to all who enjoy reading about the achievements and triumphs of real women. For anyone who has met depression face-to-face, Your Voice in My Head is not to be passed by.more
scribd