This title is not available in our membership service

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible.

Request Title
When Sally’s family moves to Miami Beach for the winter of 1947, she is excited and nervous at the same time. What will school be like in Florida? Will she make any friends? Will she fit in so far away from home?

Miami Beach has so many things to worry and wonder about, Sally is in for one unforgettable winter!
Published: Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780307817709
List price: $4.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Starring Sally J. Freedman as Herself
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Judy Blume calls this her most autobiographical story. An interesting childhood it must have been. Just after the end of WWII, all the family, except the father, move to Miami Beach for the winter months. THe two children change schools, must make new friends, must learn to live together in a small apartment, Sally makes her new friends as well as enemies, She also makes up stories in her head, including one in which she casts the local "crazy man" as Adolf Hitler in hiding. An active imagination in yougn Sally.more
This is a really good book about a little girl and her family going to flordia in the winter due to her brother's Nemphritis.more
How did you feel when you just moved to a new place? Well, Sally Freedman had a hard time to find her way in Miami Beach, Florida. They were just sooooooooooo happy that the world war was over, but that doesn't make Sally think that a really nice man in the neighborhood is Adolf Hitler. She has Horror thoughts about him!more
Read all 12 reviews

Reviews

Judy Blume calls this her most autobiographical story. An interesting childhood it must have been. Just after the end of WWII, all the family, except the father, move to Miami Beach for the winter months. THe two children change schools, must make new friends, must learn to live together in a small apartment, Sally makes her new friends as well as enemies, She also makes up stories in her head, including one in which she casts the local "crazy man" as Adolf Hitler in hiding. An active imagination in yougn Sally.more
This is a really good book about a little girl and her family going to flordia in the winter due to her brother's Nemphritis.more
How did you feel when you just moved to a new place? Well, Sally Freedman had a hard time to find her way in Miami Beach, Florida. They were just sooooooooooo happy that the world war was over, but that doesn't make Sally think that a really nice man in the neighborhood is Adolf Hitler. She has Horror thoughts about him!more
One of my reading goals this year was to reread some my old favourites. I read my share of Judy Blume books way back when and Starring Sally J. Freedman as Herself (along with Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret) has stayed with me. I was curious how the story would hold up over time and if I’d still be able to appreciate what I loved about it the first time. The story is set in 1947, when Sally is ten years old. The Freedmans – Sally, younger brother Douglas, their mother and grandmother - relocate from New Jersey to Miami so that Douglas can recuperate from an illness. Sally has to negotiate a new home, a new school, new friends, a tense relationship with her mother, missing her father, and spying on their elderly neighbour whom Sally is convinced is really Hitler is disguise. With all of this going on, it’s no wonder I always remembered this book being much thicker than it actually is!The thing that struck me most in rereading this story is how dark it actually is when you’re old/mature enough to realize what all of the subtext is referring to. Sally’s grandmother has relatives that were killed in Dachau, Sally often plays games of make-believe where she is a spy in Germany on a mission to capture Hitler, and in the snippets of phone conversation between Sally’s parents, an adult reader will recognize that there are more serious issues in their marriage than the kids are led to believe. I don’t think any of these things are necessarily inappropriate for younger readers, though I do think that if I was a parent, I’d want to be aware of these topics and be prepared to discuss them with my child if they came up. In all likelihood, it may not come up; I was a fairly mature reader when I was in the tween/early teen stage and I don’t remember picking up on all of this. Another thing that struck me, and I have found this in re-watching some of my old favourite movies as well, is that I now tend to see things from the grown-up characters’ perspectives than the kids. In this case, I felt for Mr. Freedman and really wanted to give Mrs. Freedman’s head a shake. Ma Fanny (the grandmother) was great.The story is entertaining and as it turns out, is semi-autobiographical. I can’t say I loved it as much this time around but it did bring back some fond memories.more
I was recently reminded of this after a conversation about the rarity of children's books about Jews that aren't all Holocaust all the time. I remembered loving this as a kid and am pleased that it stands up well to a rereading as an adult. Blume really is a good writer.This is the story of Sally, a ten-year-old girl who moves from New Jersey to Florida with her mom, brother, and grandma after World War II, because her brother has been ill and winters down south are recommended for people's health. The community they move to seems to be all Jewish and most of the other families are also down there for the winter due to illness.Not only does Sally have to make new friends, but she also has to adjust to how different things are in the south, such as calling everyone ma'am and sir, and segregation (I love when she writes to her dad, confused about someone who scolded her and her friend for using the colored water fountain, and her dad says it's not that different up north, people are just quieter about it, and as an example asks her how many black kids were in her old school in New Jersey).The other main thread is Sally's wild imagination (including her deciding a strange old man who lives in their apartment building is Hitler in disguise) and how she misunderstands things she hears grown-ups talking about (reading this as an adult, it's much more amusing to see the things that fly over Sally's head).If you never read this as a kid, or even if you did, I highly recommend checking it out. It's definitely a fun (and very quick) read.more
Load more
scribd