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“Updated to include dramatic new evidence from NASA and the National Academy of Sciences pointing to a knockout of the electrical power grid by solar systems expected to climax in 2012-2013.”

Don’t look up! It won’t help. You can’t get out of the way, you can’t dig a hole deep enough to hide. The end is coming, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

So why read this book? Because you can’t look away when not just the religious fanatics are saying we’re all going to be destroyed but the scientists are in on the act too. Here’s what they’re saying: We’re a million years over due for a mass extinction.

The sun at radiation minimum is acting much worse than at solar maximum, and one misdirected spewing of plasma could fry us in an instant. The magnetic field—which shields us from harmful radiation—is developing a mysterious crack.

Our solar system is entering an energetically hostile part of the galaxy.

The Yellowstone supervolcano is getting ready to blow, and if it does, we can look forward to nuclear winter and 90 percent annihilation.

The Maya, the world’s greatest timekeepers ever, say it’s all going to stop on December 21, 2012.

So, see? There’s nothing you can do, but you might as well sit back and enjoy the show.

You’ll get a good chuckle. That’s why you should read this book.

Published: Crown Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780767927154
List price: $11.99
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As someone who was a tad disappointed when the clock ticked over to 12/22/2012, this book was an interesting investigation into the various doomsday scenarios. It did have examples/interviews from the science world, and included religious points of view as well. All those coincidences intrigued me, and the book was fluidly written, with little bits of humor thrown in, so I found it a compelling read. This book wasn't looking to change anyone's mind, just to investigate the different end-time scenarios, and to note how they seems to converge on 2012. Now that the main "sell by" date has passed us by, I suppose this book can be an interesting example of how even plenty of circumstantial evidence doesn't a conviction make.more
It's more "technical" than I expected. And, at the same time, quite spiritually written. (Author capitalizes "God"). Lots of specific details on the how and why and who believes the world will end in 2012.There is lots of evidence such as the increased solar activity, volcanic pressure, ozone depletion and etc... and evidence of how scientists believed this has all happened before and is due to happen again. Of course, we're talking about a time scale which has a window of about 40,000 - 100,000 years, depending on who you ask.So, to sum it up. The world could end at any moment, but it could also occur anytime between now and 100,000 years from now (or even longer, because even if the earth was in a 700,000 year cycle, who knows that it wasn't an incremental cycle so next time it might be a 900,000 year cycle.) And, of course, that assumes that scientists can *know* anything from evidence left 600,000 years ago.No doubt all this will happen. But the only thing we know for sure is that it didn't happen yesterday either. Any guess as to when it *will* happen, well, that's what it is, a guess. (More likely a superbug flu will kill us all first, but he doesn't mention that.)more
You know, if you're going to read about all the depressing ways the world might end in 2012, you might as well get a chuckle out of it. (Because apparently we won't be laughing for long!) I don't know if I buy into all the 2012 hype, although it's interesting to read about. The writing was clever and funny. The author had lots of solid (?) examples. I couldn't put the book down (partly because I was petrified.)more
CRAP. Sorry for the pedestrian review. But this book is NOT scientific. Horrible read. Don't bother.more
Couldn't finish; utter crap. I was hoping for an intelligent, skeptically-minded exploration of the 2012 meme, but the intelligence was a thin veneer of credulous New Age-ism. I briefly hoped that it would be fun -- like a treatment for an apocalyptic action movie or an alternative history romp. But I couldn't get past the bullshit.more
I'm still not ready to buy into the idea that the world is going to end/be reborn on 12/21/12 but the book is certainly interesting and it does provide food for thought. A few of the disasters he talks about don't have any particular tie to 2012. Yellowstone might erupt at any time, there's no reason to think it's especially likely in 2012 unless you believe that sunspots will cause it. (Also, the docudrama he mentions about Yellowstone erupting is very well done). Interestingly, that docudrama also deals with the fact that saying "we're overdue for x" where x equals a massive earthquake, die off, plague, volcanic eruption, isn't entirely meaningless, but it's still mostly a scare tactic, and one that the author of this book employs more than once.Still, it sounds like 2011-2012 is going to be a very interesting time in terms of solar activity and activity in space.The author also addresses the fact that it may become a self-fulfilling prophecy. There are certainly some fundamentalists (of all 3 major western religions) who think God just isn't moving fast enough on that whole Armageddon thing so they need to speed it along. It's a very interesting book. I'm willing to concede that we may well have a more difficult year in terms of natural disasters and sunspots interfering with satellites, but I'm still pretty sure the vast majority of the human race will be around come 2013.more
It is a fun read, in all, but I don't necessarily take it seriously. I was much more interested in it as an odd memoir of the author--a sort of fear and loathing before the big one drops. Joseph is an entertaining writer, to say the least. The joke of that he is a minor character in his own memoir, or, to be more blunt, in his own life, comes to fore by the end. The book is about him and his fears. The science, if one can really call it that, is a side note.more
Yes, It's written in a very light way. No, The science isn't that in depth, but the author has still collated a sizable collection of predictions, concerning the convergence of belief that 2012 will be a significant year. Raising the question to just how would we cope, with any global disaster that might befall us, whether it comes in that year or any other time. Not being a person who is easily swayed by others opinions, overtly religious or scientific, nor a dooms day subscriber, I still have concerns regarding 2012 after reading what Lawrence Joseph has to say. I found this book interesting food for thought, making me stop and consider what exactly the concept of 2012, as it is presented here and many other places, means to my future. Time to take stock of our own lives, and the chains of cause and effect that are constantly triggered by our actions, not only in regard to our own existence but also to the planet as a whole.more
This book was clearly written and quite enjoyable from my scientific exploration point of view. Reading this book will cause you to consider reading about the Mayans in greater detail.more
Somehow I always get suckered into nonsense like this. Lawrence Joseph begins by declaring that he is not one of the nut-case disaster-monkeys that populate this genre. His opening chapters back this notion up. The information about Mayan systems of dating is quite interesting and his dscussion of links between global warming, increased solar activity and natural disasters is fascinating as well. By the end, however, he seems to have run out of serious material to discuss. Later chapters spend a lot of time seriously discussing "Planet X", the "Noosphere" (an atmospheric layer containing all thoughts ever), Bible/Koran/Talmud secret codes, and mind reading.It's fun to read and, in the beginning, it is somewhat interesting. By the end, I was so annoyed by the nonsense stuff that I had difficulty dealing with what were otherwise very thought provoking concepts.more
I found this book in the science section of Barnes and Noble, probably because its title includes the word "scientific." After reading it, I felt cheated and realized It should have been in the "New Age" stack. It has entirely too much speculation from Mayan mystics, I Ching crap, and rot from the Bible and the Koran. The parts concerning speculative science are suprerficial and regurgitated. And not a thing about the halocene extinction and the Carolina Bays. The writing style is sophomoric and irritatingly breathless.more
Read all 12 reviews

Reviews

As someone who was a tad disappointed when the clock ticked over to 12/22/2012, this book was an interesting investigation into the various doomsday scenarios. It did have examples/interviews from the science world, and included religious points of view as well. All those coincidences intrigued me, and the book was fluidly written, with little bits of humor thrown in, so I found it a compelling read. This book wasn't looking to change anyone's mind, just to investigate the different end-time scenarios, and to note how they seems to converge on 2012. Now that the main "sell by" date has passed us by, I suppose this book can be an interesting example of how even plenty of circumstantial evidence doesn't a conviction make.more
It's more "technical" than I expected. And, at the same time, quite spiritually written. (Author capitalizes "God"). Lots of specific details on the how and why and who believes the world will end in 2012.There is lots of evidence such as the increased solar activity, volcanic pressure, ozone depletion and etc... and evidence of how scientists believed this has all happened before and is due to happen again. Of course, we're talking about a time scale which has a window of about 40,000 - 100,000 years, depending on who you ask.So, to sum it up. The world could end at any moment, but it could also occur anytime between now and 100,000 years from now (or even longer, because even if the earth was in a 700,000 year cycle, who knows that it wasn't an incremental cycle so next time it might be a 900,000 year cycle.) And, of course, that assumes that scientists can *know* anything from evidence left 600,000 years ago.No doubt all this will happen. But the only thing we know for sure is that it didn't happen yesterday either. Any guess as to when it *will* happen, well, that's what it is, a guess. (More likely a superbug flu will kill us all first, but he doesn't mention that.)more
You know, if you're going to read about all the depressing ways the world might end in 2012, you might as well get a chuckle out of it. (Because apparently we won't be laughing for long!) I don't know if I buy into all the 2012 hype, although it's interesting to read about. The writing was clever and funny. The author had lots of solid (?) examples. I couldn't put the book down (partly because I was petrified.)more
CRAP. Sorry for the pedestrian review. But this book is NOT scientific. Horrible read. Don't bother.more
Couldn't finish; utter crap. I was hoping for an intelligent, skeptically-minded exploration of the 2012 meme, but the intelligence was a thin veneer of credulous New Age-ism. I briefly hoped that it would be fun -- like a treatment for an apocalyptic action movie or an alternative history romp. But I couldn't get past the bullshit.more
I'm still not ready to buy into the idea that the world is going to end/be reborn on 12/21/12 but the book is certainly interesting and it does provide food for thought. A few of the disasters he talks about don't have any particular tie to 2012. Yellowstone might erupt at any time, there's no reason to think it's especially likely in 2012 unless you believe that sunspots will cause it. (Also, the docudrama he mentions about Yellowstone erupting is very well done). Interestingly, that docudrama also deals with the fact that saying "we're overdue for x" where x equals a massive earthquake, die off, plague, volcanic eruption, isn't entirely meaningless, but it's still mostly a scare tactic, and one that the author of this book employs more than once.Still, it sounds like 2011-2012 is going to be a very interesting time in terms of solar activity and activity in space.The author also addresses the fact that it may become a self-fulfilling prophecy. There are certainly some fundamentalists (of all 3 major western religions) who think God just isn't moving fast enough on that whole Armageddon thing so they need to speed it along. It's a very interesting book. I'm willing to concede that we may well have a more difficult year in terms of natural disasters and sunspots interfering with satellites, but I'm still pretty sure the vast majority of the human race will be around come 2013.more
It is a fun read, in all, but I don't necessarily take it seriously. I was much more interested in it as an odd memoir of the author--a sort of fear and loathing before the big one drops. Joseph is an entertaining writer, to say the least. The joke of that he is a minor character in his own memoir, or, to be more blunt, in his own life, comes to fore by the end. The book is about him and his fears. The science, if one can really call it that, is a side note.more
Yes, It's written in a very light way. No, The science isn't that in depth, but the author has still collated a sizable collection of predictions, concerning the convergence of belief that 2012 will be a significant year. Raising the question to just how would we cope, with any global disaster that might befall us, whether it comes in that year or any other time. Not being a person who is easily swayed by others opinions, overtly religious or scientific, nor a dooms day subscriber, I still have concerns regarding 2012 after reading what Lawrence Joseph has to say. I found this book interesting food for thought, making me stop and consider what exactly the concept of 2012, as it is presented here and many other places, means to my future. Time to take stock of our own lives, and the chains of cause and effect that are constantly triggered by our actions, not only in regard to our own existence but also to the planet as a whole.more
This book was clearly written and quite enjoyable from my scientific exploration point of view. Reading this book will cause you to consider reading about the Mayans in greater detail.more
Somehow I always get suckered into nonsense like this. Lawrence Joseph begins by declaring that he is not one of the nut-case disaster-monkeys that populate this genre. His opening chapters back this notion up. The information about Mayan systems of dating is quite interesting and his dscussion of links between global warming, increased solar activity and natural disasters is fascinating as well. By the end, however, he seems to have run out of serious material to discuss. Later chapters spend a lot of time seriously discussing "Planet X", the "Noosphere" (an atmospheric layer containing all thoughts ever), Bible/Koran/Talmud secret codes, and mind reading.It's fun to read and, in the beginning, it is somewhat interesting. By the end, I was so annoyed by the nonsense stuff that I had difficulty dealing with what were otherwise very thought provoking concepts.more
I found this book in the science section of Barnes and Noble, probably because its title includes the word "scientific." After reading it, I felt cheated and realized It should have been in the "New Age" stack. It has entirely too much speculation from Mayan mystics, I Ching crap, and rot from the Bible and the Koran. The parts concerning speculative science are suprerficial and regurgitated. And not a thing about the halocene extinction and the Carolina Bays. The writing style is sophomoric and irritatingly breathless.more
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