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The Alchemist - 10th Anniversary Edition

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The Alchemist - 10th Anniversary Edition

ratings:
3.5/5 (12,312 ratings)
Length:
158 pages
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Oct 13, 2009
Format:
Book

Description

"My heart is afraid that it will have to suffer," the boy told the alchemist one night as they looked up at the moonless sky." Tell your heart that the fear of suffering is worse than the suffering itself. And that no heart has ever suffered when it goes in search of its dreams."

Every few decades a book is published that changes the lives of its readers forever. The Alchemist is such a book. With over a million and a half copies sold around the world, The Alchemist has already established itself as a modern classic, universally admired. Paulo Coelho's charming fable, now available in English for the first time, will enchant and inspire an even wider audience of readers for generations to come.

The Alchemist is the magical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure as extravagant as any ever found. From his home in Spain he journeys to the markets of Tangiers and across the Egyptian desert to a fateful encounter with the alchemist.

The story of the treasures Santiago finds along the way teaches us, as only a few stories have done, about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, learning to read the omens strewn along life's path, and, above all, following our dreams.

Publisher:
Released:
Oct 13, 2009
Format:
Book

About the author

Paulo Coelho is the author of The Alchemist, he was born in 1947 in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Being the author of 30 books that have sold over 320 million copies in 170 countries, he has become one of the most widely read authors in the world today. Paulo Coelho is the recipient of over 115 awards and honours, including the Hans Christian Andersen Award, the Grinzane Cavour Book Award and the Chevalier de l'Ordre National de la Légion d'Honneur, to name a few.

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Reviews

What people think about The Alchemist - 10th Anniversary Edition

3.4
12312 ratings / 514 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    I want to give this book 3.5 stars, but Goodreads doesn't allow that.I thought The Alchemist was a fantasy novel. I was wrong! The book is one of those books that tells a story and the reader learns life-long lessons. It's more of a self-help book in story format; if that makes sense.I enjoyed the story, at first. I even enjoyed the lesson it was teaching, to begin with. It made me think about my own life and ponder the "what if" questions. The book also made me see times in my life where "omens" could have been clear to me too. However, although I did get the meaning of the book, the longer I read, the more I pulled away from it. Is that an omen in itself? No. I got the message, I didn't need to keep reading. However, I did and I finished the book, and I am glad I know what happened to the boy. Now I can move on.
  • (4/5)
    It reads like a fairy tale, with a hero who travels seeking a treasure and learns about himself and about listening to the spirit of the world.
  • (5/5)
    This is described on the cover as a fable, and it's a good description. The book has a beautiful, mystical, magical soul, something you don't often see outside of classic works. It is a genuine story, one of fiction, but it has a soul of solid truth. Read it, let it inspire you to chase your dreams and give you added courage to actually go out and do it.
  • (3/5)
    I start the year with a book on many of the must read lists. I'd not really paid attention to them before, but figured this would be a good book to start with for the year.It offered an Interesting start and not at all what I expected when I saw the title. I like the thought that everyone has their own personal legend within themI admit the book is unique, but it feels very preachy to me. Like they wanted to do a morality book and a fable or fairytale and it feels like it's clashing within the text. The talk of finding one's legend and dealing with the heart of the world, plus God and the other parts of life all just seemed to clash when considering the different religions and concepts they represented.I Hadn't realized how short this book was. 4 hours by audio. But it packed in a lot of details and concepts in that short period of time. I'd be willing to give it more stars, if the internal of the story didn't feel so much of a clash. Still a good moral tale, overall.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked this book but was a little disappointed when I realised it was an expansion of a parable from Arabian Nights. Even though it's not completely original Coelho has achieved a lot in writing the story, and has nice sentences.

    On the subject of originality, I haven't read Manuscript in Accra because it takes (steals?) heavily from The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran.
  • (2/5)
    Meh, I don't see the hype. It wasn't bad, it wasn't great. It just wasn't my thing. The Alchemist tells the story of a young shepherd boy whose simple life is turned upside down when a traveling king, tells him where to find treasure. From there the boy goes on a long journey, falling omens and good sense to try and find the treasure that lay near the pyramids. It's a little deep for me and I didn't much care for it. I don't like these kind of fables. The only good part was having Jeremy Irons narrate the audiobook version.
  • (5/5)
    TBC 11/09; listened to a version read by Jeremy Irons; little book packed with lots of points to ponder. Shepherd boy from Spain goes in search of his treasure, which he believes he will find in the pyramids, when actually it's really what's within him.
  • (4/5)
    It is unlike any book I have ever read. Every page had a message drilled into it so deeply. It doesn't matter your religion. This book provides a universal spiritual value, that not even the Bible holds. I loved this book in a way that i could love no other.
  • (2/5)
    Probably better appreciated by young people who are just starting to think about the purpose of their lives than for those who are satisfied with the life they've been leading. Poetic writing can be difficult to make sense of but this short story moves quickly. Listening to the audiobook was more enjoyable than reading the text.
  • (3/5)
    Santiago decides he doesn't want to be a priest, but a shepherd, (not a very noble profession.) But his father supports him and gives him money to buy sheep.
    The boy, as Santiago is referred to, enjoys traveling with his sheep. One day a man (a King) interrupts the boy's reading and tells him of his "Personal Legend" and finding treasure. In order to find his treasure he must go to the Pyramids.
    After a two hour journey by boat, he arrives in a very different country with a different language and he's robbed of the money he received from selling his sheep.
    The story is to follow your heart and to not give up on your dream ("Personal Legend.") My problem with the story was this boy didn't know finding treasure was his "dream" until the man/King told him so. The boy thought he was living his dream until that point.
    Otherwise a good book and could be very inspirational.
  • (3/5)
    Definitely a great book about chasing your dreams and finding out what really matters.
  • (5/5)
    The Alchemist is a book that, although being a simple read, has such vast amounts of intellectual depth. Santiago, a young shepherd boy from Spain, is in search of what Paulo Coelho refers to as his ‘Personal Legend’. A Personal Legend is not unlike destiny and could also be described as one’s purpose in life. The young boy embarks on a journey from Spain to Egypt, where he believes his treasure awaits him. He struggles with self doubt and fear along the way but is guided and helped by various people.Santiago begins to learn to look at the world in an entirely new light. He is taught that it isn’t finding the treasure that is the most fulfilling of all things but it is in the journey itself that one becomes enlightened. It is important to put your heart into everything you do and if you are successful, your heart will become one with everything. The Alchemist has so much to offer readers of all ages and I would recommend it as required reading for all of humanity. I am positive I will read Paulo Coelho’s masterpiece many many more times through the years. I am confident that this book will teach me something new each time I read it.
  • (4/5)
    Read for book club at work. I really enjoyed this one. I listened to the audiobook but did purchase a copy for my personal collection. I enjoyed traveling from Spain to Egypt with the shepherd. Interesting story. Looking forward to reading more of his work.
  • (4/5)
    Paulo Coelho's masterpiece tells the mystical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure. His quest will lead him to riches far different—and far more satisfying—than he ever imagined. Santiago's journey teaches us about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, of recognizing opportunity and learning to read the omens strewn along life's path, and, most importantly, to follow our dreams. I enjoyed listening to the audio of this book. The story had a lot of wisdom and was very inspirational. Recommended for those who like inspirational books.
  • (3/5)
    So I enjoyed the story, I did. It was pleasant. But I don't really understand why it's at the top of so many top ten lists, or (apparently) got such a lot of hype. Yes, there are lessons about wisdom, and listening to your heart, and an idea that all things are one and arranged for a purpose by an omniscient divinity... but those lessons were almost superficial, arranged on the surface of a story that otherwise was fairly plain. I guess I expected to find little kernals of profundity in the book, but to have to dig for them, to discover them, rather than have them come right up and bite me on the nose.
  • (2/5)
    Library Thing advised me that I would not like this book and they were right.Young shepherd in the Andalusia region of Spain has higher goals than being a shepherd all of his life. He reads extensively and decides that he would like to travel to the Pyramids in Egypt. He meets a stranger in a village who happens to be some kind of celestial king who tells him that the true path to happiness is to follow his heart, personal judgment, dreams and watch for omens.Shepherd sells his flock, boards a ship to Tangiers, is robbed of his savings and manages to find work, survive, save and travel to the Pyramids with the alchemist who is mentioned to him by a traveling Englishman, chemistry professor.Desert warriors, a woman, omens, life in the desert, sand storms, encounters with destiny and long chats with his heart fulfill his destiny.
  • (2/5)
    One star from me and another for all the millions who inexplicably adore this screed.
  • (1/5)
    Thinly disguised christian propaganda.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of those books I'd heard a lot about and seen around, but I didn't pick it up until recently. The story is powerful, and it's an excellent parable/fable on how to truly live your life. Definitely a book I need to add to my collection.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book, especially the conversation of the Shepherd boy with an old king, a merchant, an Englishman and an Alchemist. Full of many wonderful quotes, and many life lessons, the author maintains the interest of the reader throughout the book.
  • (5/5)
    "...when we strive to become better than we are, everything around us becomes better, too.... And that's where the power of love comes in. Because wen we love, we strive to become better than we are." (p. 156)
  • (2/5)
    I really can't stand this book. I have never quite understood what all the fuss is about with Paulo Coelho.
  • (3/5)
    Definitely a great book about chasing your dreams and finding out what really matters.
  • (3/5)
    Good Book.
  • (1/5)
    Dull and pointless
  • (4/5)
    A enlightening parable.
  • (2/5)
    Over rated. The author preaches, lectures and explains too much, instead of letting the story teach us. Also, the plot is totally unoriginal. The main story is found in a famous hasidic folk tale. I don't know if that specific version was the inspiration of Coehlo's story but I have no doubt the same story is found in other folklore as well. The original is short and can be told in two minutes. Coelho drags it out without adding more power or depth to the story.
  • (2/5)
    Good plot, lyrical, loony book.
  • (2/5)
    Too simplistic. Requires a belief in magic things.
  • (4/5)
    The front says it's an "international bestselling phenomenon" and the back says "discover the book that changed millions of lives" so how could I pass this one up? Very much in the tradition of Kahlil Gilbran and James Redfield, The Alchemist appears to be a simple read with silly self-help dogmas like Personal Legend's and Universal Language's. Yet, as much as you may feel "deep philosophy" is being thrown at you in each line, the story is delightful and it's ending - the unexpected obvious. A quick read that will rejuvenate your faith in the joy of being alive.