Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

In Searching for God Knows What, best-selling author Donald Miller invites you to reconnect with a faith worth believing. With humor, intelligence, and his trademark writing style, he shows that  relationship is God’s way of leading us to redemption. And our need for redemption drives us to relationship with God. “Being a Christian,” Miller writes, “is more like falling in love than understanding a series of ideas.”

Maybe you are a Christian wondering what faith you signed up for. Or maybe you don’t believe anything and are daring someone—anyone—to show you a genuine example of authentic faith. Somewhere beyond the self-help formulas, fancy marketing, and easy promises there is a life-changing experience with God waiting. Searching for God Knows What weaves together beautiful stories and fresh perspectives on the Bible to show one man’s journey to find it.

“Like a shaken snow globe, Donald Miller’s newest collection of essays creates a swirl of ideas about the Christian life that eventually crystallize into a lovely landscape . . . [He] is one of the evangelical book market’s most creative writers.” —Christianity Today

“If you have felt that Jesus is someone you respect and admire—but Christianity is something that repels you—Searching for God Knows What will give you hope that you still can follow Jesus and be part of a church without the trappings of organized religion.” —Dan Kimball Author of The Emerging Church and Pastor of Vintage Faith Church, Santa Cruz, CA

“For fans of Blue Like Jazz, I doubt you will be disappointed. Donald Miller writes with the wit and vulnerability that you expect. He perfectly illustrates important themes in a genuine and humorous manner . . . For those who would be reading Miller for the first time, this would be a great start.” —Relevant

 

Published: Thomas Nelson on
ISBN: 9781418529956
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Searching for God Knows What
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
this is my all time favorite book!more
Ahhhh......such good unspoken truth proclaimed with boldness and bluntness! Refreshing and freeing!more
What if the Christian church is so focused on theology that it's lost sight of what really makes one a Christian? Miller contends that the American church has reduced a complex relationship with Jesus Christ to a formulaic gospel of steps to becoming a Christian. In Searching for God Knows What, he seeks to emphasize the relational nature of the gospel and demonstrates how different a worldview this would be from mainstream American culture.A friend of mine lent this to me months ago because it related to a conversation we were having at the time. Of course, I've since forgotten the original impetus, but it didn't really matter in the end. Miller's style is extremely conversational and not particularly well-written, with a few over-the-top analogies to make his points. At least once, he got his facts wrong, as when he says that King Herod had the children of Israel murdered (according to Matthew 2, he ordered that boys under the age of 2 in Bethlehem and the vicinity be killed, not the entirety of Israel). Despite these flaws, from time to time a sentence or a paragraph would make me stop in my reading tracks. He would manage to crystallize an idea or use an illustration that was truly thought-provoking. I didn't always agree with Miller, ultimately. He clearly does not "get" sports, for example, and his politics clash with mine. But I enjoyed the challenge to think about exactly what I believe about my relationship with God, and how this necessarily affects my relationship with others.more
A disappointment compared to Blue Like Jazz. Seemed to have no point whatsoever.more
Read all 16 reviews

Reviews

this is my all time favorite book!more
Ahhhh......such good unspoken truth proclaimed with boldness and bluntness! Refreshing and freeing!more
What if the Christian church is so focused on theology that it's lost sight of what really makes one a Christian? Miller contends that the American church has reduced a complex relationship with Jesus Christ to a formulaic gospel of steps to becoming a Christian. In Searching for God Knows What, he seeks to emphasize the relational nature of the gospel and demonstrates how different a worldview this would be from mainstream American culture.A friend of mine lent this to me months ago because it related to a conversation we were having at the time. Of course, I've since forgotten the original impetus, but it didn't really matter in the end. Miller's style is extremely conversational and not particularly well-written, with a few over-the-top analogies to make his points. At least once, he got his facts wrong, as when he says that King Herod had the children of Israel murdered (according to Matthew 2, he ordered that boys under the age of 2 in Bethlehem and the vicinity be killed, not the entirety of Israel). Despite these flaws, from time to time a sentence or a paragraph would make me stop in my reading tracks. He would manage to crystallize an idea or use an illustration that was truly thought-provoking. I didn't always agree with Miller, ultimately. He clearly does not "get" sports, for example, and his politics clash with mine. But I enjoyed the challenge to think about exactly what I believe about my relationship with God, and how this necessarily affects my relationship with others.more
A disappointment compared to Blue Like Jazz. Seemed to have no point whatsoever.more
We are all on a search for love - but as the song says, most of the time we are looking in all the wrong places. We seek affirmation from other people, from relationships both real and imagined; when in reality we should be looking only to God for the love we desperately need. In his book "Searching for God Knows What", Donald Miller tells us that we find this not through following the rituals of religion; instead, we learn about God's love through having an intimate relationship with Him. Miller suggests that perhaps Christianity is less about following a set of rules and regulations, and more about falling in love with Jesus. The really stunning thing about this love story is not that we should love Jesus...but that Jesus loves us and sacrificed everything for us, to bring communion back to our broken relationship with Him. When you really believe this, it will change not only the way you love God, but the way you love others as well - not as people who can give you the love you need, but as people you can love just for who they are.more
This is a revised, updated edition of the book. There's apparently also a lot you can do online (codes, anagrams, etc.) but I haven't done that--and probably won't; my brain doesn't seem to work that way.This book's thesis is that we all need a relationship with God but that, because of what happened in the Garden of Eden, we don't have one. That causes us to look elsewhere for affirmation (friends, colleagues, etc.). I'm not sure I agree with the idea that we all can only function if we have someone telling us we're worthwhile, but I know everyone likes to be liked, so I'm willing to go with it.Another main point is that everyone has their idea of who God is and who Jesus is, and that we're probably all wrong because we're trying to cast Him/Them in our terms and that, coincidentally, He/They completely agree with how we view the world.One thing that did strike me was (and this gets back to the idea that we seek elsewhere for affirmation) that he said that religion-baiting is actually Satan's work. For an example, he mentioned that he grew up Baptist and was always pretty smug around his Methodist friends because they had it wrong. Now, though, "It all sounds you innocent until you realize whatever evil thing it was that caused me to believe Baptists are better than Methodists is the same evil thing that has Jews killing Palstinians rather than talking to them, and for that matter, Palestinians killing Jews rather than engaging in an important conversation about land and history and peace."I do feel like a lot of the time, we define ourselves in terms of being better or worse than other people, and that bothers me.I think I preferred Blue Like Jazz, though.more
Load more
scribd