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Some Stories Just Can’t Be Stopped . . .

What Difference Do It Make? continues the hard-to-believe story of hope and reconciliation that began with the New York Times bestseller, Same Kind of Different as Me. Ron Hall and Denver Moore, unlikely friends and even unlikelier coauthors—a wealthy fine-art dealer and an illiterate homeless African American—share the hard-to-stop story of how a remarkable woman’s love brought them together. Now, in What Difference Do It Make? Ron and Denver along with Lynn Vincent offer:
  • more of the story—with untold anecdotes, especially Ron’s struggle with his difficult father and Denver’s dramatic stint in Angola prison
  • the rest of the story—how Same Kind of Different as Me came to be written and changed the lives of its authors
  • the ongoing story—true tales of hope from people whose lives have been changed by Ron and Denver’s story and how they make a difference in their worlds
  • your part in the story—wise, practical, and hard-lived guidance for how you can make a difference to those in need
  • plus intriguing extras—including full-page color samples of Denver’s paintings
Deeply moving but never sappy or sentimental, What Difference Do It Make? answers its own question with a simple and emphatic answer. What difference can one person (or two) make in the world? A lot!

Published: Thomas Nelson on Sep 29, 2009
ISBN: 9781418586171
List price: $15.99
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A true story about how a wealthy Caucasian couple, Ron and Deborah Hall, came to befriend a down-on-his-luck Af-Am man, Denver Moore, in modern-day Texas. Deborah has a persistent faith that compels her husband Ron to repent of sins in his personal life and to join her as she reaches out to the poor in her community. They volunteer once a week at a local soup kitchen, where they meet Denver. The chapters alternate between first-person narratives of Ron and Denver, and their stories kept my interest. Part of the reason for this is that the book was well written and not sappy, and it had some very humorous dialog and passages. No doubt this was due to the deft touch of Lynn Vincent, who apparently served as a ghost writer or editor and helped them shape their stories.There were things that bothered me about this book, but not enough to put it down. I usually don't like stories that feature unrealistic characters, and by that I mean people who are extremely smart or extremely rich or extremely good looking or extremely anything, because such characters and their stories are so hard for me to relate to. I’m not interested in reading stories about people with such advantages, as I rarely find that they have much of anything to teach me about life -- and that is something I look for when I select a book to read. As a main character, Ron came dangerously close to that, but what redeemed him for me were his failings, some of them pretty major. SPOILER ALERT!: While the death of his wife was very sad, I think he was still too raw when he wrote about it -- it was still too consuming, he had yet to put it into perspective.I would recommend this as a good book to read, especially if you (like me) often find yourself wondering if you can do more to help others than you currently are. Here are two people who took one small step in that direction, were faithful and consistent in doing so, and suddenly were presented with the opportunity to make a real difference in someone else's life. Lucky them!read more
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A moving story, but it tries a little too hard and doesn't fully flesh out Ron Hall's personal transformation or really make clear the actual work that's been achieved because of his friendship with Denver Moore. How many people are being helped by the ministry and services? How expansive are their efforts? How effective? I mean, it's lovely that they've got this friendship, but what have they accomplished, really?read more
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This book started off extremely well, telling of the lives of two very different men: 1) Ron Hall - an egocentric, wealthy, shallow art dealer; and 2) Denver Moore - a homeless man who grew up in severe poverty and for most of his life, was homeless. Denver's story is interesting and very, very sad, being pitched as a "modern-day slave" life (which I only partially agree with), he never had any schooling or real housing, and worked most of his life without real pay. It's a scary look at how so many people can and do fall through the cracks in today's "modern" world. The two men meet through Ron's wife, Deborah, who is a Christian missionary in downtown, downtrodden Fort Worth, TX. But beyond that, she is truly an incredible woman and the real light behind this story. She "forces" shallow Ron to befriend the angry, silent, maybe dangerous Denver and the two men become friends. About 1/4 of the way in, I had to roll my eyes at the constant, oppressive Christian blather, and it follows through, bonking the unknowing reader on the head mercilessly, until the end of the book. At times, it's hard to swallow and if you are not of the same religious bent, it actually becomes quite boring. But due to the high accolades, I did read it through to the end. Ultimately, I am glad I did. Religion aside, the real gem in here is how one person can make a difference to so many; and also, in one individual's life. If each of us helped just one person to this degree, what a world it would be. To watch as Deborah goes to some of the roughest parts of Fort Worth and simply befriends the homeless people is what kindness is all about. She never judged, just listened ... and helped. So it is inspiring as to the acts of the people involved. I see now this book is being hyped as a Christian/inspirational book (and the book discussion questions that follow are all religious), so I think that is likely this book's target audience. But it's worth picking up for the small lessons and to learn about the lives of Deborah Hall and Denver Moore.read more
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One of the best books I have ever read. I laughed and cried. It truly inspired me and made me think about my world and the difference I could and should be making as a child of God.read more
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Alternating chapters, Hall and Moore weave together a single narrative of prejudice, redemption, love, and death. Hall is a well-to-do art dealer; Moore, a sharecropper turned vagrant. Their paths meet at a homeless mission in Fort Worth, Texas, where Hall’s wife (Debbie) serves with a fearless and relentless love – a love which serve as the impetus for Hall and Moore’s deep and lasting friendship. This compelling story calls into question many commonly held assumptions about homelessness, race, friendship, and struggles with God. B+read more
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I was really engrossed in this book until about halfway through, and then it got very "preachy." I understand that God and religion had a huge influence in the author's life, but honestly, it got repetitive.read more
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A professor is assigning this to her class and I need to know it well enough to help the students with it. So I read it. Very early on, I realized something very important-I am not the target audience for this book. I despise books written in any deep-accent (one of the reasons I dislike Twain, and his characters only spoke that way). I also think our students are poor enough writers. They don't need this as an influence. I also can't stand any book that paints Texans with the same broad brush. But most of all, even if it was a true story, I don't care for books in which a person's reason for doing something is a hallucination or dream. I also dislike it when one's bad life is solely attributed to race-the line of "sharecroppers" ended in my family two generations ago, so I've heard a number of these stories from very white grandparents.That being said, as a librarian, I would recommend this book to people who do like inspirational stories, especially from a Christian perspective and people interested in racial tensions in the South. I'm sure many people read this as a redemptive and inspirational book about the way faith and persistence can change lives, one at a time. For me, the only way the novel could have been more painful was if it gave me paper cuts on every page.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Received for review from Thomas Nelson publishers. A beautifully told  story of healing from both physical and spiritual injury and illness. The story begins with the origins of the two authors and chronicles their very different lives leading up to the point they are united through the charity work of Ron Hall's wife, Debbie. The story proceeds to tell a story of faith and courage in the face of daunting adversity as Ron learns to see the value in the unique individual, Denver learns to trust others and trust in his God-given gifts, and Debbie battles to stay alive long enough to see her husband and her friend meet the destiny God has laid before them to help the truly destitute and spread the word of God. This is a truly inspirational tale, rooted in fundamental Christianity as it can only be in Texas. However, the reader is not force-fed the gospel and the authors have done a great job of grounding their message in pure spirituality, not just Christian dogma.read more
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It has been a while since I have read this book. However, I read my son's review and found his perspective interesting - and knowing him as I do I understand where he is coming from. My self however, have a different perspective. I am a Counselor AT a Rescue Mission here in the Midwest. While I personally cannot fully identify with Denver's predicament, or even Ron's for that matter I can understand the hopeless of Denver and the disillusionment of Ron. I must say that I cringe when I read other reviewers passing judgement on Ron - saying he is being "Self Righteous" etc., Ron had come to the place in his life where he realized that he was in fact, NOT "Righteous" at all! This book is about the redemption of two men, with very different backgrounds. Ron and Denver did have one thing in common... A desperate need for real, genuine PEACE in their hearts.
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I love to read books about relationships that inspire me and somehow after finishing the story I feel changed for the good, you know, from within. Almost instantly I could tell I was going to like the three main characters in the book because the details of their characters was so believable and embraceable.When it comes to the meaning of friendship, I think Denver's line in the story is most accurate and complete. "But if you is lookin' for a real friend, then I'll be one forever." So what does an art dealer, a Christian wife with the heart of the servant and an uneducated, homeless black man have in common? The one thing, the main thing is that they made a difference in each others lives. It was not by chance that they found strength in their purpose together. I have learned to be more compassionate towards everyone I meet now and as I get to know them, remember the element of surprise can be your friend. I have no doubt that you will be inspired with a renewed perspective in faith and relationships with this remarkable, true and unforgettable story. ***** stars. Highly recommend this quality book!read more
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Incredible is just one way to describe this book. Other ways to describe this memoir would be emotional, heart-wrenching, hopeful, gripping, and inspiring. This was our book club pick for the month, but had been on my To-Read list ever since my Sister-in-law, Julie, told me about this book a year or so ago. My Sister-in-law works at the Mission of Hope, a place for homeless people to go and feel loved by God, to get a meal, a prayer, or just a place to rest. Their mission is to meet basic needs, change hearts, disciple people and teach the church. No one is turned away. For more on their services and needs visit Mission of Hope. The needs there are great and the love is overflowing. So, as I read this book, I thought about Julie and her work a lot. 13 years ago, I also used to run a homeless shelter for women and children. This story took me back to those days as well. No matter where you live, there are homeless people. They may be staying with families or friends or bouncing from house to house rather than living on park benches or under interstates, but they are homeless just the same. I was drawn into the story immediately. The chapters are short and flip back and forth from Ron's, (the art dealer) story to Denver's (the homeless man). The horrors of Denver's life were tough to read, but his strength and faith helped you move through each chapter, hoping for Ron and his wife Deborah to break his shell. The marriage of Ron and Deborah also imparted lessons of faith and forgiveness that couldn't be ignored.I became deeply emotional throughout the story and once I got into it, I could not put it down. Thankfully, it was a quick read. I appreciated the pictures included in the back of the book. It put faces to names and gave photos of Denver's past life. As a Christian, I wasn't shocked by the expressions of faith in the story as others might be. But, I did find that I was moved and changed by Denver and Ron's story. I recommend this to Christians as well as non-believers, book clubs, church groups/Bible studies, and anyone looking for an inspirational life-story.read more
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This is a true story about a homeless drifter, Denver Moore, who was a sharecropper, and a wealthy man, Ron Hall, who became an art dealer. They met through a woman named Debbie and wrote this book together. This book is well edited. The book alternates talking about each of the two main characters, and goes through the history of their lives. There is a third main character - "the unlikely woman who bound them together", and although she was discussed in passing in the first fifteen c ...more This is a true story about a homeless drifter, Denver Moore, who was a sharecropper, and a wealthy man, Ron Hall, who became an art dealer. They met through a woman named Debbie and wrote this book together. This book is well edited. The book alternates talking about each of the two main characters, and goes through the history of their lives. There is a third main character - "the unlikely woman who bound them together", and although she was discussed in passing in the first fifteen chapters, she didn't seem all that unlikely.The history is interesting enough, but it seems like there is only one suspense here, and that is, when do they meet and what they have in common? Maybe it is just my antsy mood this summer, but frankly, after fifteen chapters, I got tired of waiting, and decided that what they might have in common wasn't all that compelling. There are pictures in the back of the book, which told me the answer, and it is what I expected. This is a New York times bestseller, and supposed to be a really inspirational story, and maybe it is for some people. but I think it is one of those things that get so hyped up - a NYT bestseller and Barbara Bush even liked the book - that it can't live up to the hype, at least not for me.I got this book from Thomas Nelson in exchange of my review.read more
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The true story of a homeless man and how God's love prevailed. It is a story of a woman's faith, love, and hope and how she, Deborah Hall changed the lives of her own family and others.read more
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meeting of unlikely people and the faithread more
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Ron is a successful rich white man, an art dealer in Fort Worth, Texas, and Denver is a Black homeless man, enslaved in the tenant farmer system of the South a generation ago. These two lives came together in a wondrous way to become a deep friendship based on strong faith and the love and guidance of Deborah, Ron's wife.read more
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Amazing story. First part was hard to read, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. An unlikely friendship that I won't forget.read more
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This book was really moving. It is about a abused African American slave meeting a man with the most kind wife that could possible live on this earth. When there lives connect problems unfold as well as hatred, love, sickness, and regret. Truley moving book with an amazing story!RECOMMENDED: 13 years and aboveread more
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Uplifting and inspiring. I think this would make a better movie.read more
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This book was a wonderful reminder or what those of the slavery era went through and in cases still go through!! It is also great to realize through this book that although someone is labeled as dangerous, things are always able to be turned around, and at times all that needs to happen is for those to be given the opportunity to do so!! It was a GREAT Read of which I really enjoyed!! I have recommended it to many people! - anonymous RCPL patronread more
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Well written account of the interactions between a wealthy Texas family and a homeless man. Many readers will, I'm sure, find this an inspiring story and will value it because of the emphasis on Christianity. Others will scorn it because, in spite of the obvious sincerity of the author, the account comes across as patronizing and, to some extent, self-serving. It reveals far more of life among the affluent than it does of life on the streets. Recommended for those who enjoy Christian "testimony."read more
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This is such an honest and touching story, "The truth about it is, whether we is rich or poor or somethin in between, this earth ain't no final restin place. So, in a way, we is all homeless -- just workin our way toward home." Denver Moore AMEN!read more
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Read only a few chapters. Seemed it was going to be a little too self-righteous, so I took it back to the library. Maybe some other day...read more
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Rated: AGreat book! Perhaps living and working in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area and having spent much of my childhood in the old South made the book more special to me. In many ways, I could relate to Ron and Debbie Hall's life -- from their lives, to thier successes and struggles, to their fight against cancer, to their ministry to the "least of these". I found myself laughing and crying from chapter to chapter. Romans 8:28.read more
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The chapters alternate between Ron Hall (the international art dealer) and Denver Moore (the homeless man), two men brought together by Ron Hall’s wife.We learn how Ron Hall came from lower-middle class to successful international art dealer and how Denver left a sharecropping farm to come to Fort Worth with no skills to get by in a city. Debbie draws her husban Ron into work at a Mission, feeding the homeless, and she encourages him to become friends with Denver. It is nice to watch the Hall’s faith grow as they do this as a couple.The interspersing of chapters from Ron and from Denver works really well and the structure of the story is very readable. The protracted illness and death of Debbie is rough but real and gives insight into the relationship developing between the two men. It started with what looked like a homeless man in need of a friend. But Denver became the friend to Ron as he dealt with anger and grief.Their goal was to get people to look at the homeless with a new perspective and to see more people reach out and make a difference. I think it is successful.read more
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What a powerful, powerful story. I loved reading this book. It made me cry like a baby during the last 1/4 of the book, and I hate that...but I still love the book. Ron and Denver would have never been friends, if not for Debbie. Debbie was used by God to bring them together and to bring Denver out of homelessness. Denver was used by God to help Ron and to be strong for him. I wish I were more like Debbie.read more
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Great book! A must read for everyone.read more
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Oh my, this brought tears to my eyes and made me think about relationships. Yet was a fast read. A great book.read more
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Hardly a combo you would expect. Interesting to read of the developing friendship of these two men thanks to Ron's wife, Debbie. All this and it is a true story!read more
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Two things struck me about this book most strongly. First, despite the vernacular parts of it were written in, it was incredibly readable and I really enjoyed entering slightly more into the story through the non-proper English. Second, I found it a powerful testament to what sorts of transformations happen when the gospel infects people and gives them a real burden and real love that is invested for a long time into others. For that alone it is worth reading and contemplating.read more
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When an upper class couple decide to volunteer at a soup kitchen, they never expect that a homeless man will impact their lives more than they impact his. Told in narratives by all three, a beautiful story is written about the love and trust built between strangers.read more
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A true story about how a wealthy Caucasian couple, Ron and Deborah Hall, came to befriend a down-on-his-luck Af-Am man, Denver Moore, in modern-day Texas. Deborah has a persistent faith that compels her husband Ron to repent of sins in his personal life and to join her as she reaches out to the poor in her community. They volunteer once a week at a local soup kitchen, where they meet Denver. The chapters alternate between first-person narratives of Ron and Denver, and their stories kept my interest. Part of the reason for this is that the book was well written and not sappy, and it had some very humorous dialog and passages. No doubt this was due to the deft touch of Lynn Vincent, who apparently served as a ghost writer or editor and helped them shape their stories.There were things that bothered me about this book, but not enough to put it down. I usually don't like stories that feature unrealistic characters, and by that I mean people who are extremely smart or extremely rich or extremely good looking or extremely anything, because such characters and their stories are so hard for me to relate to. I’m not interested in reading stories about people with such advantages, as I rarely find that they have much of anything to teach me about life -- and that is something I look for when I select a book to read. As a main character, Ron came dangerously close to that, but what redeemed him for me were his failings, some of them pretty major. SPOILER ALERT!: While the death of his wife was very sad, I think he was still too raw when he wrote about it -- it was still too consuming, he had yet to put it into perspective.I would recommend this as a good book to read, especially if you (like me) often find yourself wondering if you can do more to help others than you currently are. Here are two people who took one small step in that direction, were faithful and consistent in doing so, and suddenly were presented with the opportunity to make a real difference in someone else's life. Lucky them!
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A moving story, but it tries a little too hard and doesn't fully flesh out Ron Hall's personal transformation or really make clear the actual work that's been achieved because of his friendship with Denver Moore. How many people are being helped by the ministry and services? How expansive are their efforts? How effective? I mean, it's lovely that they've got this friendship, but what have they accomplished, really?
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This book started off extremely well, telling of the lives of two very different men: 1) Ron Hall - an egocentric, wealthy, shallow art dealer; and 2) Denver Moore - a homeless man who grew up in severe poverty and for most of his life, was homeless. Denver's story is interesting and very, very sad, being pitched as a "modern-day slave" life (which I only partially agree with), he never had any schooling or real housing, and worked most of his life without real pay. It's a scary look at how so many people can and do fall through the cracks in today's "modern" world. The two men meet through Ron's wife, Deborah, who is a Christian missionary in downtown, downtrodden Fort Worth, TX. But beyond that, she is truly an incredible woman and the real light behind this story. She "forces" shallow Ron to befriend the angry, silent, maybe dangerous Denver and the two men become friends. About 1/4 of the way in, I had to roll my eyes at the constant, oppressive Christian blather, and it follows through, bonking the unknowing reader on the head mercilessly, until the end of the book. At times, it's hard to swallow and if you are not of the same religious bent, it actually becomes quite boring. But due to the high accolades, I did read it through to the end. Ultimately, I am glad I did. Religion aside, the real gem in here is how one person can make a difference to so many; and also, in one individual's life. If each of us helped just one person to this degree, what a world it would be. To watch as Deborah goes to some of the roughest parts of Fort Worth and simply befriends the homeless people is what kindness is all about. She never judged, just listened ... and helped. So it is inspiring as to the acts of the people involved. I see now this book is being hyped as a Christian/inspirational book (and the book discussion questions that follow are all religious), so I think that is likely this book's target audience. But it's worth picking up for the small lessons and to learn about the lives of Deborah Hall and Denver Moore.
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One of the best books I have ever read. I laughed and cried. It truly inspired me and made me think about my world and the difference I could and should be making as a child of God.
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Alternating chapters, Hall and Moore weave together a single narrative of prejudice, redemption, love, and death. Hall is a well-to-do art dealer; Moore, a sharecropper turned vagrant. Their paths meet at a homeless mission in Fort Worth, Texas, where Hall’s wife (Debbie) serves with a fearless and relentless love – a love which serve as the impetus for Hall and Moore’s deep and lasting friendship. This compelling story calls into question many commonly held assumptions about homelessness, race, friendship, and struggles with God. B+
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I was really engrossed in this book until about halfway through, and then it got very "preachy." I understand that God and religion had a huge influence in the author's life, but honestly, it got repetitive.
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A professor is assigning this to her class and I need to know it well enough to help the students with it. So I read it. Very early on, I realized something very important-I am not the target audience for this book. I despise books written in any deep-accent (one of the reasons I dislike Twain, and his characters only spoke that way). I also think our students are poor enough writers. They don't need this as an influence. I also can't stand any book that paints Texans with the same broad brush. But most of all, even if it was a true story, I don't care for books in which a person's reason for doing something is a hallucination or dream. I also dislike it when one's bad life is solely attributed to race-the line of "sharecroppers" ended in my family two generations ago, so I've heard a number of these stories from very white grandparents.That being said, as a librarian, I would recommend this book to people who do like inspirational stories, especially from a Christian perspective and people interested in racial tensions in the South. I'm sure many people read this as a redemptive and inspirational book about the way faith and persistence can change lives, one at a time. For me, the only way the novel could have been more painful was if it gave me paper cuts on every page.
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Received for review from Thomas Nelson publishers. A beautifully told  story of healing from both physical and spiritual injury and illness. The story begins with the origins of the two authors and chronicles their very different lives leading up to the point they are united through the charity work of Ron Hall's wife, Debbie. The story proceeds to tell a story of faith and courage in the face of daunting adversity as Ron learns to see the value in the unique individual, Denver learns to trust others and trust in his God-given gifts, and Debbie battles to stay alive long enough to see her husband and her friend meet the destiny God has laid before them to help the truly destitute and spread the word of God. This is a truly inspirational tale, rooted in fundamental Christianity as it can only be in Texas. However, the reader is not force-fed the gospel and the authors have done a great job of grounding their message in pure spirituality, not just Christian dogma.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It has been a while since I have read this book. However, I read my son's review and found his perspective interesting - and knowing him as I do I understand where he is coming from. My self however, have a different perspective. I am a Counselor AT a Rescue Mission here in the Midwest. While I personally cannot fully identify with Denver's predicament, or even Ron's for that matter I can understand the hopeless of Denver and the disillusionment of Ron. I must say that I cringe when I read other reviewers passing judgement on Ron - saying he is being "Self Righteous" etc., Ron had come to the place in his life where he realized that he was in fact, NOT "Righteous" at all! This book is about the redemption of two men, with very different backgrounds. Ron and Denver did have one thing in common... A desperate need for real, genuine PEACE in their hearts.
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I love to read books about relationships that inspire me and somehow after finishing the story I feel changed for the good, you know, from within. Almost instantly I could tell I was going to like the three main characters in the book because the details of their characters was so believable and embraceable.When it comes to the meaning of friendship, I think Denver's line in the story is most accurate and complete. "But if you is lookin' for a real friend, then I'll be one forever." So what does an art dealer, a Christian wife with the heart of the servant and an uneducated, homeless black man have in common? The one thing, the main thing is that they made a difference in each others lives. It was not by chance that they found strength in their purpose together. I have learned to be more compassionate towards everyone I meet now and as I get to know them, remember the element of surprise can be your friend. I have no doubt that you will be inspired with a renewed perspective in faith and relationships with this remarkable, true and unforgettable story. ***** stars. Highly recommend this quality book!
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Incredible is just one way to describe this book. Other ways to describe this memoir would be emotional, heart-wrenching, hopeful, gripping, and inspiring. This was our book club pick for the month, but had been on my To-Read list ever since my Sister-in-law, Julie, told me about this book a year or so ago. My Sister-in-law works at the Mission of Hope, a place for homeless people to go and feel loved by God, to get a meal, a prayer, or just a place to rest. Their mission is to meet basic needs, change hearts, disciple people and teach the church. No one is turned away. For more on their services and needs visit Mission of Hope. The needs there are great and the love is overflowing. So, as I read this book, I thought about Julie and her work a lot. 13 years ago, I also used to run a homeless shelter for women and children. This story took me back to those days as well. No matter where you live, there are homeless people. They may be staying with families or friends or bouncing from house to house rather than living on park benches or under interstates, but they are homeless just the same. I was drawn into the story immediately. The chapters are short and flip back and forth from Ron's, (the art dealer) story to Denver's (the homeless man). The horrors of Denver's life were tough to read, but his strength and faith helped you move through each chapter, hoping for Ron and his wife Deborah to break his shell. The marriage of Ron and Deborah also imparted lessons of faith and forgiveness that couldn't be ignored.I became deeply emotional throughout the story and once I got into it, I could not put it down. Thankfully, it was a quick read. I appreciated the pictures included in the back of the book. It put faces to names and gave photos of Denver's past life. As a Christian, I wasn't shocked by the expressions of faith in the story as others might be. But, I did find that I was moved and changed by Denver and Ron's story. I recommend this to Christians as well as non-believers, book clubs, church groups/Bible studies, and anyone looking for an inspirational life-story.
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This is a true story about a homeless drifter, Denver Moore, who was a sharecropper, and a wealthy man, Ron Hall, who became an art dealer. They met through a woman named Debbie and wrote this book together. This book is well edited. The book alternates talking about each of the two main characters, and goes through the history of their lives. There is a third main character - "the unlikely woman who bound them together", and although she was discussed in passing in the first fifteen c ...more This is a true story about a homeless drifter, Denver Moore, who was a sharecropper, and a wealthy man, Ron Hall, who became an art dealer. They met through a woman named Debbie and wrote this book together. This book is well edited. The book alternates talking about each of the two main characters, and goes through the history of their lives. There is a third main character - "the unlikely woman who bound them together", and although she was discussed in passing in the first fifteen chapters, she didn't seem all that unlikely.The history is interesting enough, but it seems like there is only one suspense here, and that is, when do they meet and what they have in common? Maybe it is just my antsy mood this summer, but frankly, after fifteen chapters, I got tired of waiting, and decided that what they might have in common wasn't all that compelling. There are pictures in the back of the book, which told me the answer, and it is what I expected. This is a New York times bestseller, and supposed to be a really inspirational story, and maybe it is for some people. but I think it is one of those things that get so hyped up - a NYT bestseller and Barbara Bush even liked the book - that it can't live up to the hype, at least not for me.I got this book from Thomas Nelson in exchange of my review.
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The true story of a homeless man and how God's love prevailed. It is a story of a woman's faith, love, and hope and how she, Deborah Hall changed the lives of her own family and others.
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meeting of unlikely people and the faith
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Ron is a successful rich white man, an art dealer in Fort Worth, Texas, and Denver is a Black homeless man, enslaved in the tenant farmer system of the South a generation ago. These two lives came together in a wondrous way to become a deep friendship based on strong faith and the love and guidance of Deborah, Ron's wife.
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Amazing story. First part was hard to read, but I persisted and I'm glad I did. An unlikely friendship that I won't forget.
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This book was really moving. It is about a abused African American slave meeting a man with the most kind wife that could possible live on this earth. When there lives connect problems unfold as well as hatred, love, sickness, and regret. Truley moving book with an amazing story!RECOMMENDED: 13 years and above
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Uplifting and inspiring. I think this would make a better movie.
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This book was a wonderful reminder or what those of the slavery era went through and in cases still go through!! It is also great to realize through this book that although someone is labeled as dangerous, things are always able to be turned around, and at times all that needs to happen is for those to be given the opportunity to do so!! It was a GREAT Read of which I really enjoyed!! I have recommended it to many people! - anonymous RCPL patron
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Well written account of the interactions between a wealthy Texas family and a homeless man. Many readers will, I'm sure, find this an inspiring story and will value it because of the emphasis on Christianity. Others will scorn it because, in spite of the obvious sincerity of the author, the account comes across as patronizing and, to some extent, self-serving. It reveals far more of life among the affluent than it does of life on the streets. Recommended for those who enjoy Christian "testimony."
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This is such an honest and touching story, "The truth about it is, whether we is rich or poor or somethin in between, this earth ain't no final restin place. So, in a way, we is all homeless -- just workin our way toward home." Denver Moore AMEN!
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Read only a few chapters. Seemed it was going to be a little too self-righteous, so I took it back to the library. Maybe some other day...
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Rated: AGreat book! Perhaps living and working in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area and having spent much of my childhood in the old South made the book more special to me. In many ways, I could relate to Ron and Debbie Hall's life -- from their lives, to thier successes and struggles, to their fight against cancer, to their ministry to the "least of these". I found myself laughing and crying from chapter to chapter. Romans 8:28.
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The chapters alternate between Ron Hall (the international art dealer) and Denver Moore (the homeless man), two men brought together by Ron Hall’s wife.We learn how Ron Hall came from lower-middle class to successful international art dealer and how Denver left a sharecropping farm to come to Fort Worth with no skills to get by in a city. Debbie draws her husban Ron into work at a Mission, feeding the homeless, and she encourages him to become friends with Denver. It is nice to watch the Hall’s faith grow as they do this as a couple.The interspersing of chapters from Ron and from Denver works really well and the structure of the story is very readable. The protracted illness and death of Debbie is rough but real and gives insight into the relationship developing between the two men. It started with what looked like a homeless man in need of a friend. But Denver became the friend to Ron as he dealt with anger and grief.Their goal was to get people to look at the homeless with a new perspective and to see more people reach out and make a difference. I think it is successful.
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What a powerful, powerful story. I loved reading this book. It made me cry like a baby during the last 1/4 of the book, and I hate that...but I still love the book. Ron and Denver would have never been friends, if not for Debbie. Debbie was used by God to bring them together and to bring Denver out of homelessness. Denver was used by God to help Ron and to be strong for him. I wish I were more like Debbie.
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Great book! A must read for everyone.
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Oh my, this brought tears to my eyes and made me think about relationships. Yet was a fast read. A great book.
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Hardly a combo you would expect. Interesting to read of the developing friendship of these two men thanks to Ron's wife, Debbie. All this and it is a true story!
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Two things struck me about this book most strongly. First, despite the vernacular parts of it were written in, it was incredibly readable and I really enjoyed entering slightly more into the story through the non-proper English. Second, I found it a powerful testament to what sorts of transformations happen when the gospel infects people and gives them a real burden and real love that is invested for a long time into others. For that alone it is worth reading and contemplating.
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When an upper class couple decide to volunteer at a soup kitchen, they never expect that a homeless man will impact their lives more than they impact his. Told in narratives by all three, a beautiful story is written about the love and trust built between strangers.
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