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From the Publisher

The war against drugs was supposed to make America better, right? It failed. Not only does the drug war fail to keep Americans from using drugs, but its crackdown tactics also produce bigger problems than it promises to solve. In this fearlessly audacious book, Joel Miller shows that drug prohibition creates tremendous amounts of crime and corruption, helps finance anti-American terrorists, makes a joke out of U.S. border security, chips away at constitutional liberties, militarizes law enforcement, and jails hundreds of thousands of Americans. And for what? A bigger, more intrusive government that cares less and less about individual rights. Told in a bold, uncompromising style, Miller's book reveals the true and terrible nature of the war on drugs and also, just as importantly, informs readers about what they can do to kick the drug-war habit.

"Miller nails it," says Larry Elder, host of ABC Radio's nationally syndicated Larry Elder Show and best-selling author. "He powerfully and persuasively articulates the folly, the harm and the unconstitutionality of our government's War against Drugs." And says Judge Andrew P. Napolitano of Fox News, "If you are interested in our freedoms or fearful of the government destroying human lives and wasting tax dollars on another American Prohibition, read this book and send a copy to every lawmaker and judge you know."

If you want to understand the drug problem in America, you first need to know how the government is making it worse. Bad Trip is the place to start.

Published: Thomas Nelson on
ISBN: 9781418508555
List price: $9.99
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