From the Publisher

Only one thing stands between you and success.

It isn't experience.

It isn't talent.

World-renowned leadership expert John C. Maxwell says if you want to succeed, you must learn how to connect with people. And while it may seem like some folks are just born with it, the fact is anyone can learn how to make every communication an opportunity for a powerful connection. In Everyone Communicates, Few Connect, Maxwell shares the Five Principles and Five Practices to develop the crucial skill of connecting, including:

Finding common ground Keeping your communication simple Capturing people's interest Inspiring people Staying authentic in all your relationships

The ability to connect with others is a major determining factor in reaching your full potential. It's no secret! Connecting is a skill you can learn and apply in your personal, professional, and family relationships—and you can start now!

 

Topics: Leadership, Communication, Job Search, Spirituality , Entrepreneurship, Career, Informative, and Guides

Published: Thomas Nelson on
ISBN: 9781418554767
List price: $19.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Everyone Communicates, Few Connect by John C. Maxwell
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Entrepreneur
2 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

9 Ways to Become a Better Leader

Encourage employees to disagree with you. Companies get into trouble when everyone is afraid to speak truth to power. "If all you hear is how great you're doing, that should be a danger sign," says executive coach Ray Williams. Don't micromanage. Empower the people below you, then leave them alone. "A good part of leadership is stepping back," says Bill Pasmore, senior vice president at the Center for Creative Leadership. "A good leader leads from front and back." When people err, don't destroy them.But make sure they learn whatever lessons there are to be learned from their mistakes. Show com
Entrepreneur
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

What to Do When Your Boss Doesn't Trust You

Q: I work part time at a company. My desk sits out of the owner’s view. After I called in sick for a few days thanks to a case of shingles, the owner had his administrative assistant—also a part-time employee—tell me they can’t trust the hours on my timecard because they can’t see when I arrive or leave, and I “could be ripping them off.” I’m insulted. I report hours accurately, have been there a year and resent that a peer was sent to deliver this message to me. My initial instinct was to quit. How should I handle this?  A: Your experience underscores some ethical problems that can be avoided
Inc.
2 min read
Tech

Gabriel Flateman

As told to JON FINE Why only one mattress? There’s all this choice in the mattress industry and much of it is wildly mundane. When the problem is an overabundance of choices, the answer is pretty simple: Focus on one core thing that works for many people. With T-shirts, I wouldn’t advise the same strategy, because there is inherent choice in fashion. It’s got to stem from user need. But there is a lot of opportunity, in efficiency and clarity of purpose, gained by making and marketing one product. Still, there are long-established companies in your business. How do you chip away at them? W