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From the Publisher

Nearly 1,000 crowd-pleasing and award-winning recipes presented in an easy, step-by-step format to ensure success for anyone-even beginners.

More than just a comprehensive cookbook, The Blue Ribbon Country Cookbook contains easy-to-follow techniques and detailed explanations that ensure success. Chapters include every type of food, from soups and stews to pies and tarts, and recipes range from traditional favorites to more contemporary dishes such as Fresh Pear Salad with Ginger Dressing and Rosemary Chicken with Red Raspberry Sauce. What makes this book so special is not just the large number of recipes but also the amount of indispensable information that it contains.

An Amazon reviewer explains the book best: "After 16 years of marriage, I was still not able to make some of the dishes my husband's mom did. I never quite got it right. I can now! In her book, Diane taught me the basics of cooking from scratch and now I receive the highest compliment--As Good as Mom's and Grandma's."

Topics: Gastronomy, Tips & Tricks, Informative, and Cookbooks

Published: Thomas Nelson on
ISBN: 9781418568214
List price: $4.99
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