Reader reviews for The Traveler's Gift by Andy Andrews

Great read! Made me realize that lots of time the situation is not great in the beginning but with time and effort turns out ok
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
When a man reaches his lowest point, he is transported through time to meet historical characters who give him the seven keys to success. A bit cliched, but has some gems of inspiration.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
First, let’s get the seven principles out of the way:The buck stops here. I will seek wisdom. I am a person of action. I have a decided heart. Today I will choose to be happy. I will greet this day with a forgiving spirit. I will persist without exception. These are certainly reasonable principles for living, and this book teaches you so. I don’t have a problem with any of that. What I DO have a problem with is how the book teaches it, and what else goes along with it.The book is the story of David Ponder (uh, get, it, like he’s supposed to PONDER something important), a typical middle-aged guy who puts his priorities wrong, loses all his money, and decides to kill himself. So far, just a touch melodramatic. But then, instead of dying, he finds himself being whisked away to visit six historic figures, from Solomon to Abraham Lincoln to Anne Frank, who each pass on to him one of the seven life-transforming principles. They each not only co-operate with this bizarre process, but each pen a letter to him, each about the same length and sprinkled with the same type of late 20th century self-talk & affirmations that none of those people would have actually written.So far, you just have a overly stretched sentimental & incredulous metaphor, but one that is fairly innocuous and sometimes even moving. But things start getting weird with the last of David’s trips: he meets the archangel Gabriel, who not only passes along the last principle but also says he is the last “traveler” that God has ordained to take this message and share it with others. He says that David is last in a line that has included Joan of Arc, George Washington, & Martin Luther King, Jr. Okay, that’s just too much for me. But it gets worse: Gabriel then starts talking about a pre-Adamic ancient race that fell apart, and implies that the principles that David now has will save the human race from a similar fate.Okay, time out, boys & girls. Does the author really believe that there was a culture 30,000 years ago that was technologically superior to our own? Does the author really believe that these seven principles are the key to the whole human race? It almost sounds like he is putting these principles above Scripture itself, that he is claiming divine revelation in them. The final blow is that David is given a view of his future, where these principles have not only made him fabulously rich, but hailed by tens of thousands as their spiritual benefactor.Bottom line: good principles, but WAY too much nuttiness in between for me.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I couldn't stand too finish it. Shallow, shallow, shallow.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is life-changing! Andy Andrews is the modern day Will Rogers as a story teller! The way he weaves historic facts into his fiction is incredible. Andy's own story of living under a bridge to a life of significance is inspiring by itself, but the way he communicates the information for us to use in our daily lives is amazing. I've purchased 100 copies of this book to give to my family, friends, and clients and believe that it should be mandatory reading for children and adults alike. Read this book, implement his ideas and your life will be better for it.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Traveler's Gift is a great book about a man at a crossroads in his life. It is very similar to The Five People You Meet In Heaven. It is really uplifting and inspirational.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
David Ponders life is spinning out of control. He has exchanged his career for his family and his dignity for success. As his world crashes around his, his car wraps itself around a tree. Before regaining consciousness, David is thrust into a vision in which he visits seven historical characters, learning an invaluable life lesson from each: the importance of responsibility, wisdom, action, determination, gratefulness, forgiveness, and persistence. Each of these character traits is to be treasured, and yet their treatment here seemed cartoonish and simplistic. B
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the second Andy Andrews book I've read. I enjoyed trying to guess who was going to deliver each insight. I was successful several times. I'm pleased that my county library had a copy of the large print version on the shelf.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
No rating provided
Very interesting book about a man who is losing everything, his job, his home, his self-esteem. He is at the brink of something and suddenly he is whirling through time and visiting many different time periods, famous and not-so famous people who help him learn the seven decisions to success. Fascinating premise, I enjoyed this novel very much.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The "gifts/decisions" are all great rules to live by, but they are so overly generalized without specific instructions that they really mean nothing. A really quick-read though so no harm in reading to grab the few useful tidbits you can from this book. My favorite decision for success is "the buck stops here." My least favorite was the seventh because, well, Gabriel? Not a real person which was very disappointing.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
scribd