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From the Publisher

This inspirational novel explores the drama, sweep, and grandeur of World War II--those who fought it overseas and those who lived through it on the home front--and a time when faith in God was our national security.

"Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth . . . Put out my hand, and touched the face of God"--John Gillespie Magee, Jr., a WWII airman who died in combat at the age of 19.

It has been called "The Last Good War" and those who fought it have been called "The Greatest Generation." They lived every day as if it were their last--loving, laughing, and trusting that God held their future.

In this moving novel, Lt. Mark White, a B-17 bomber pilot, meets Emily Hagan only weeks before he ships out to England. They fall in love through letters as each faces the war on separate sides of the Atlantic, but will the war and a misunderstanding tear them apart forever? Lt. Lee Arlington Grant has disappointed his military family by becoming a chaplain instead of a warrior. He hopes his service in the war will heal his rift with his father while he shares Christ with his fellow soldiers-especially Tom Canby. Their lives and the lives of the men and women who fight at their side are interwoven with danger, romance, tragedy, and ultimately hope as the war and their roles in it draw to a close.

This powerful story is about a man's love for a woman, the soldiers' love for their country, and the love of God for each of His children. Written by a decorated veteran of the Vietnam War, Touch The Face of God brings to life a time and a place that is quickly being forgotten.

Published: Thomas Nelson on
ISBN: 9781418557638
List price: $7.99
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