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A dangerous, homeless drifter who grew up picking cotton in virtual slavery. An upscale art dealer accustomed to the world of Armani and Chanel. A gutsy woman with a stubborn dream. A story so incredible no novelist would dare dream it.

It begins outside a burning plantation hut in Louisiana. . . and an East Texas honky-tonk . . .and, without a doubt, in the heart of God. It unfolds in a Hollywood hacienda . . . an upscale New York gallery . . . a downtown dumpster. . . a Texas ranch.
Gritty with pain and betrayal and brutality, it also shines with an unexpected, life-changing love.
This incredible retelling now includes an interview with the authors and a reader’s guide that is perfect for individual or group study.
The most inspirational and emotionally gripping story of faith, fortitude, and friendship I have ever read. A powerful example of the healing, restorative power of forgiveness and the transformational, life changing power of unconditional love.—Mark Clayman, Executive Producer for the Academy Award–nominated The Pursuit of Happyness
Denver Moore and Ron Hall’s story is one that moved me to tears. The friendship that forms between these two men at a time when both were in great need is an inspiration to all of us to be more compassionate to everyone we come in contact with. This is truly a wonderful book!—Mrs. Barbara Bush

Topics: Race Relations, Cancer, Christianity, Friendship, Spirituality , Inspirational, Heartfelt, Multiple Perspectives, American South, Texas, and Hope

Published: Thomas Nelson on Apr 1, 2011
ISBN: 9781418525651
List price: $11.99
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my buddy's mother makes $82 /hr on the internet . She has been fired for 9 months but last month her income was $17946 just working on the internet for a few hours. see it here
>>>­ www.Time-Jobs34.comread more
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I’ve had this book on my wishlist for a long time but it was my daughter-in-law who finally got me to read this book. She suggested we go to a face-to-face book group and this book was the book to be discussed. She read it first and raved about it. I finally got to it this week and I agreed with her. Wonderful story. Can’t wait to talk about it on Monday night.read more
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Take one older black homeless man, toss in a middle-aged affluent art dealer and add one religious, very selfless woman, mix well and you got a recipe for this story. "The Same Kind of Different As Me" is an autobiography of sorts. It tells the heroric saga of a middle-aged Christian woman, selflessly helping the homeless find God and her battle with cancer. The story is narrated from her husband and a black homeless man's point of view. Taking the reader on a jouney the book explores many deep subjects such as death, forgiveness, faith, pain and suffering and prejudice. The book does have plenty of religious undertones and at times may be just a bit over the top for those non-christian readers. However, if you do chose to read it cover to cover it will leave you with a quite a few life lessons and a lot to really think about, "cause ever person that looks like a enemy on the outside ain't necessarily one on the inside".read more
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Incredible is just one way to describe this book. Other ways to describe this memoir would be emotional, heart-wrenching, hopeful, gripping, and inspiring. This was our book club pick for the month, but had been on my To-Read list ever since my Sister-in-law, Julie, told me about this book a year or so ago. My Sister-in-law works at the Mission of Hope, a place for homeless people to go and feel loved by God, to get a meal, a prayer, or just a place to rest. Their mission is to meet basic needs, change hearts, disciple people and teach the church. No one is turned away. For more on their services and needs visit Mission of Hope. The needs there are great and the love is overflowing. So, as I read this book, I thought about Julie and her work a lot. 13 years ago, I also used to run a homeless shelter for women and children. This story took me back to those days as well. No matter where you live, there are homeless people. They may be staying with families or friends or bouncing from house to house rather than living on park benches or under interstates, but they are homeless just the same. I was drawn into the story immediately. The chapters are short and flip back and forth from Ron's, (the art dealer) story to Denver's (the homeless man). The horrors of Denver's life were tough to read, but his strength and faith helped you move through each chapter, hoping for Ron and his wife Deborah to break his shell. The marriage of Ron and Deborah also imparted lessons of faith and forgiveness that couldn't be ignored.I became deeply emotional throughout the story and once I got into it, I could not put it down. Thankfully, it was a quick read. I appreciated the pictures included in the back of the book. It put faces to names and gave photos of Denver's past life. As a Christian, I wasn't shocked by the expressions of faith in the story as others might be. But, I did find that I was moved and changed by Denver and Ron's story. I recommend this to Christians as well as non-believers, book clubs, church groups/Bible studies, and anyone looking for an inspirational life-story.read more
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Hardly a combo you would expect. Interesting to read of the developing friendship of these two men thanks to Ron's wife, Debbie. All this and it is a true story!read more
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A professor is assigning this to her class and I need to know it well enough to help the students with it. So I read it. Very early on, I realized something very important-I am not the target audience for this book. I despise books written in any deep-accent (one of the reasons I dislike Twain, and his characters only spoke that way). I also think our students are poor enough writers. They don't need this as an influence. I also can't stand any book that paints Texans with the same broad brush. But most of all, even if it was a true story, I don't care for books in which a person's reason for doing something is a hallucination or dream. I also dislike it when one's bad life is solely attributed to race-the line of "sharecroppers" ended in my family two generations ago, so I've heard a number of these stories from very white grandparents.That being said, as a librarian, I would recommend this book to people who do like inspirational stories, especially from a Christian perspective and people interested in racial tensions in the South. I'm sure many people read this as a redemptive and inspirational book about the way faith and persistence can change lives, one at a time. For me, the only way the novel could have been more painful was if it gave me paper cuts on every page.read more
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What a powerful, powerful story. I loved reading this book. It made me cry like a baby during the last 1/4 of the book, and I hate that...but I still love the book. Ron and Denver would have never been friends, if not for Debbie. Debbie was used by God to bring them together and to bring Denver out of homelessness. Denver was used by God to help Ron and to be strong for him. I wish I were more like Debbie.read more
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Alternating chapters, Hall and Moore weave together a single narrative of prejudice, redemption, love, and death. Hall is a well-to-do art dealer; Moore, a sharecropper turned vagrant. Their paths meet at a homeless mission in Fort Worth, Texas, where Hall’s wife (Debbie) serves with a fearless and relentless love – a love which serve as the impetus for Hall and Moore’s deep and lasting friendship. This compelling story calls into question many commonly held assumptions about homelessness, race, friendship, and struggles with God. B+read more
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meeting of unlikely people and the faithread more
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This is a book I read for a non-fiction reading group. I found it a compelling story, despite the fact that I'm not a believer in visitations by angels or dead people, both of which feature into the story. A deeply religious and wealthy couple from Fort Worth befriends a taciturn homeless ex-con. It's an unlikely friendship, but one that rings true, and it's written in the voices of the two men. I found Denver Moore's story at first sad but ultimately inspiring -- it's difficult coming to terms with the kind of poverty that is as deep as that in which he grew up. An amazing story, highly recommended.read more
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I really wanted to love this book that was supposed to be about helping a homeless man make something of his life. In reality, Denver Moore, the man who grew up as a Louisiana sharecropper and ended up on the streets of Ft. Worth, gave far more than he received. His story is inspirational and believable. He has retained his humility despite the success that his transformation earned him.Unfortunately, his liberator doesn't come off as well in the book, at least in the beginning. I would have stopped reading this if it hadn't been for a book group because it's difficult for me to trust a narrator with a puffed-up ego as big as the state of Texas! I hate to say it, but Ron Hall's transformation came at the expense of his wife, who was portrayed as an angel on earth. It's hard to know if this is true because she doesn't get to tell her story. She did get to deliver one of the book's best lines when Ron was rambling on about his Armani suits and his new Rolls-Royce. She asked him if that Rolls had a rearview mirror - and did he see a rock star when he looked in it. Loved it.This did turn out to be an inspiring story about prejudice, homelessness, forgiveness, suffering, and faith. With all of these worthy topics, it is understandable that the book is a little heavyhanded on the spiritual overtones. I wish the writing had been better and that it didn't focus so much on the tragedy that cemented the friendship. Still, it left me with a feeling of hope and that is certainly worth the price of a book.read more
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Great book. A story worth reading that is inspiring, beautiful, heartbreaking, touches your heart and opens your eyes. It is a book filled with emotion; be ready for laughs, tears and serious moments. It opens your heart and soul to what is real commitment and love. This book truly embraces the phrase “pay if forward”, and teaches us to never over look the people God brings into our life.................A wonderful book that I hope to bring to my book club.read more
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Read only a few chapters. Seemed it was going to be a little too self-righteous, so I took it back to the library. Maybe some other day...read more
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A Same Kind of Different As Me was slow to start . . . so slow I put it down after 65pages and have moved on.The writing is well, but the writer switches between two characters, but neither was anyone I cared anything about.I'm sorry that I couldn't read on, but it bored me and I put the book down.read more
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This is a true story about a homeless drifter, Denver Moore, who was a sharecropper, and a wealthy man, Ron Hall, who became an art dealer. They met through a woman named Debbie and wrote this book together. This book is well edited. The book alternates talking about each of the two main characters, and goes through the history of their lives. There is a third main character - "the unlikely woman who bound them together", and although she was discussed in passing in the first fifteen c ...more This is a true story about a homeless drifter, Denver Moore, who was a sharecropper, and a wealthy man, Ron Hall, who became an art dealer. They met through a woman named Debbie and wrote this book together. This book is well edited. The book alternates talking about each of the two main characters, and goes through the history of their lives. There is a third main character - "the unlikely woman who bound them together", and although she was discussed in passing in the first fifteen chapters, she didn't seem all that unlikely.The history is interesting enough, but it seems like there is only one suspense here, and that is, when do they meet and what they have in common? Maybe it is just my antsy mood this summer, but frankly, after fifteen chapters, I got tired of waiting, and decided that what they might have in common wasn't all that compelling. There are pictures in the back of the book, which told me the answer, and it is what I expected. This is a New York times bestseller, and supposed to be a really inspirational story, and maybe it is for some people. but I think it is one of those things that get so hyped up - a NYT bestseller and Barbara Bush even liked the book - that it can't live up to the hype, at least not for me.I got this book from Thomas Nelson in exchange of my review.read more
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Two things struck me about this book most strongly. First, despite the vernacular parts of it were written in, it was incredibly readable and I really enjoyed entering slightly more into the story through the non-proper English. Second, I found it a powerful testament to what sorts of transformations happen when the gospel infects people and gives them a real burden and real love that is invested for a long time into others. For that alone it is worth reading and contemplating.read more
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Received for review from Thomas Nelson publishers. A beautifully told  story of healing from both physical and spiritual injury and illness. The story begins with the origins of the two authors and chronicles their very different lives leading up to the point they are united through the charity work of Ron Hall's wife, Debbie. The story proceeds to tell a story of faith and courage in the face of daunting adversity as Ron learns to see the value in the unique individual, Denver learns to trust others and trust in his God-given gifts, and Debbie battles to stay alive long enough to see her husband and her friend meet the destiny God has laid before them to help the truly destitute and spread the word of God. This is a truly inspirational tale, rooted in fundamental Christianity as it can only be in Texas. However, the reader is not force-fed the gospel and the authors have done a great job of grounding their message in pure spirituality, not just Christian dogma.read more
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Ron is a successful rich white man, an art dealer in Fort Worth, Texas, and Denver is a Black homeless man, enslaved in the tenant farmer system of the South a generation ago. These two lives came together in a wondrous way to become a deep friendship based on strong faith and the love and guidance of Deborah, Ron's wife.read more
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Denver was raised a black youth in abject poverty in the heart of Louisiana's sharecropping community, growing himself into a sharecropper as a young man, as he knew nothing else, before one day escaping into homelessness and what he surprisingly views as a better life than what he's previously known, because at least he is free and no longer a "modern day slave".Ron is a successful art dealer living the American dream with a beautiful wife who has a heart of gold. While Ron and his wife Debbie are volunteering at a homeless shelter, Debbie determines that Ron needs to befriend the irascible and anti-social Denver. It takes some time, but eventually a friendship is born, shortly before heartbreak befalls them all.Debbie is portrayed in the book nothing short of a saint. She is selfless, God-fearing (and God-loving), patient, compassionate and kind. Based on a dream she had (and which she views as a vision from God), she pushes Ron to befriend Denver. Once Ron begins to build a relationship with Denver, he finally broaches the idea of he and Denver becoming "friends", to which follows a lovely moment when Denver shares his concerns over how white people practice "catch and release" when they go fishing, and he doesn't wish to be "caught and released" like one of those fish. Ron commits to keep Denver if he can catch him, and over the years their friendship grows into brotherhood.As their friendship builds, Ron is repeatedly struck by the small town wisdom of this illiterate sharecropper/homeless man.This book is 235 pages and 67 short chapters, which is how I prefer it. I only get to read is bursts, and I always appreciate having a good stopping point every few to a dozen pages. It also includes a Readers Guide, an Interview with the Authors, and a few pages of pictures.My final word: This book was moving and inspiring. It goes beyond the trappings of life to the heart of the matter, and is proof that two people can move beyond societal lines to forge a lasting friendship that can weather any storm. And behind it all is a humble woman small of frame and great of spirit.read more
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An interesting memoir in that it covers the lives of three individuals rather than one, and is told by two of those people. Ron Hall and Denver Moore are the narrators, two men from very different walks of life who are drawn together by Deborah Hall, Ron's wife. They alternate telling the story, so each chapter is in first person, but switches from Ron's perspective to Denver's. Ron is an art dealer who managed to acquire vast sums of money through his business, while Denver is a homeless man, having run away from his slave-like existence as a sharecropper down south. Deborah drags her husband to a mission in down town Fort Worth, where they live, and the two men meet. The memoir focuses a bit on the childhood and early adult years of Ron and Denver, to set their backgrounds, but devotes much more time to the period after they meet and beyond. The narrators also spend time telling Deborah's story, as she was the instrument in bringing both men together. Her compassion led her husband into a life about God's mercy, rather than money, and her love showed Denver light after being surrounded by darkness for so long. It is a surprising story, how two men are redeemed from very different places, and a sweet story, of friendship and love. It will also make you cry. Definitely worth a read, to see a Godly way of reaching out to the homeless, and a lesson in a life that can be lived in humility and love.read more
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A true story about how a wealthy Caucasian couple, Ron and Deborah Hall, came to befriend a down-on-his-luck Af-Am man, Denver Moore, in modern-day Texas. Deborah has a persistent faith that compels her husband Ron to repent of sins in his personal life and to join her as she reaches out to the poor in her community. They volunteer once a week at a local soup kitchen, where they meet Denver. The chapters alternate between first-person narratives of Ron and Denver, and their stories kept my interest. Part of the reason for this is that the book was well written and not sappy, and it had some very humorous dialog and passages. No doubt this was due to the deft touch of Lynn Vincent, who apparently served as a ghost writer or editor and helped them shape their stories.There were things that bothered me about this book, but not enough to put it down. I usually don't like stories that feature unrealistic characters, and by that I mean people who are extremely smart or extremely rich or extremely good looking or extremely anything, because such characters and their stories are so hard for me to relate to. I’m not interested in reading stories about people with such advantages, as I rarely find that they have much of anything to teach me about life -- and that is something I look for when I select a book to read. As a main character, Ron came dangerously close to that, but what redeemed him for me were his failings, some of them pretty major. SPOILER ALERT!: While the death of his wife was very sad, I think he was still too raw when he wrote about it -- it was still too consuming, he had yet to put it into perspective.I would recommend this as a good book to read, especially if you (like me) often find yourself wondering if you can do more to help others than you currently are. Here are two people who took one small step in that direction, were faithful and consistent in doing so, and suddenly were presented with the opportunity to make a real difference in someone else's life. Lucky them!read more
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I think that this was one of the best most insprialtional books I have read in a very long time...I love the approach of how God works and even if you do not follow a particular religion you will find this book very upliftingread more
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Rated: AGreat book! Perhaps living and working in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area and having spent much of my childhood in the old South made the book more special to me. In many ways, I could relate to Ron and Debbie Hall's life -- from their lives, to thier successes and struggles, to their fight against cancer, to their ministry to the "least of these". I found myself laughing and crying from chapter to chapter. Romans 8:28.read more
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Great book! A must read for everyone.read more
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I like usually like true stories, but this one got a little preachy. I am sure Deborah was a good person, but her "perfection" and "goodness" and unending charity got a little nauseating.read more
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very interesting and inspirationalread more
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I was really engrossed in this book until about halfway through, and then it got very "preachy." I understand that God and religion had a huge influence in the author's life, but honestly, it got repetitive.read more
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A moving story, but it tries a little too hard and doesn't fully flesh out Ron Hall's personal transformation or really make clear the actual work that's been achieved because of his friendship with Denver Moore. How many people are being helped by the ministry and services? How expansive are their efforts? How effective? I mean, it's lovely that they've got this friendship, but what have they accomplished, really?read more
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Uplifting and inspiring. I think this would make a better movie.read more
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This book was so good it's hard to believe that it is non-fiction! The story of Denver and Ron touched so deep into my soul I don't think I'll soon forget their story. It was such a good reminder of how different everyone's struggles are and reinforces the lesson of judging others. This book made me realize that I need to do more to give back to others. We can wish for miracles all day or ask God to make a difference in the lives of others but ultimately it is in our hands to make that difference and do his work here on earth. Of course it is through his strength that we have been given any of our gifts but make no mistake, we are his hands, that is what we were put on this earth to do. The writing style of Denver's side takes a little getting used to but it is such a touching story and so worth it. I'd recommend this book to everyone!read more
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my buddy's mother makes $82 /hr on the internet . She has been fired for 9 months but last month her income was $17946 just working on the internet for a few hours. see it here
>>>­ www.Time-Jobs34.com
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I’ve had this book on my wishlist for a long time but it was my daughter-in-law who finally got me to read this book. She suggested we go to a face-to-face book group and this book was the book to be discussed. She read it first and raved about it. I finally got to it this week and I agreed with her. Wonderful story. Can’t wait to talk about it on Monday night.
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Take one older black homeless man, toss in a middle-aged affluent art dealer and add one religious, very selfless woman, mix well and you got a recipe for this story. "The Same Kind of Different As Me" is an autobiography of sorts. It tells the heroric saga of a middle-aged Christian woman, selflessly helping the homeless find God and her battle with cancer. The story is narrated from her husband and a black homeless man's point of view. Taking the reader on a jouney the book explores many deep subjects such as death, forgiveness, faith, pain and suffering and prejudice. The book does have plenty of religious undertones and at times may be just a bit over the top for those non-christian readers. However, if you do chose to read it cover to cover it will leave you with a quite a few life lessons and a lot to really think about, "cause ever person that looks like a enemy on the outside ain't necessarily one on the inside".
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Incredible is just one way to describe this book. Other ways to describe this memoir would be emotional, heart-wrenching, hopeful, gripping, and inspiring. This was our book club pick for the month, but had been on my To-Read list ever since my Sister-in-law, Julie, told me about this book a year or so ago. My Sister-in-law works at the Mission of Hope, a place for homeless people to go and feel loved by God, to get a meal, a prayer, or just a place to rest. Their mission is to meet basic needs, change hearts, disciple people and teach the church. No one is turned away. For more on their services and needs visit Mission of Hope. The needs there are great and the love is overflowing. So, as I read this book, I thought about Julie and her work a lot. 13 years ago, I also used to run a homeless shelter for women and children. This story took me back to those days as well. No matter where you live, there are homeless people. They may be staying with families or friends or bouncing from house to house rather than living on park benches or under interstates, but they are homeless just the same. I was drawn into the story immediately. The chapters are short and flip back and forth from Ron's, (the art dealer) story to Denver's (the homeless man). The horrors of Denver's life were tough to read, but his strength and faith helped you move through each chapter, hoping for Ron and his wife Deborah to break his shell. The marriage of Ron and Deborah also imparted lessons of faith and forgiveness that couldn't be ignored.I became deeply emotional throughout the story and once I got into it, I could not put it down. Thankfully, it was a quick read. I appreciated the pictures included in the back of the book. It put faces to names and gave photos of Denver's past life. As a Christian, I wasn't shocked by the expressions of faith in the story as others might be. But, I did find that I was moved and changed by Denver and Ron's story. I recommend this to Christians as well as non-believers, book clubs, church groups/Bible studies, and anyone looking for an inspirational life-story.
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Hardly a combo you would expect. Interesting to read of the developing friendship of these two men thanks to Ron's wife, Debbie. All this and it is a true story!
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A professor is assigning this to her class and I need to know it well enough to help the students with it. So I read it. Very early on, I realized something very important-I am not the target audience for this book. I despise books written in any deep-accent (one of the reasons I dislike Twain, and his characters only spoke that way). I also think our students are poor enough writers. They don't need this as an influence. I also can't stand any book that paints Texans with the same broad brush. But most of all, even if it was a true story, I don't care for books in which a person's reason for doing something is a hallucination or dream. I also dislike it when one's bad life is solely attributed to race-the line of "sharecroppers" ended in my family two generations ago, so I've heard a number of these stories from very white grandparents.That being said, as a librarian, I would recommend this book to people who do like inspirational stories, especially from a Christian perspective and people interested in racial tensions in the South. I'm sure many people read this as a redemptive and inspirational book about the way faith and persistence can change lives, one at a time. For me, the only way the novel could have been more painful was if it gave me paper cuts on every page.
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What a powerful, powerful story. I loved reading this book. It made me cry like a baby during the last 1/4 of the book, and I hate that...but I still love the book. Ron and Denver would have never been friends, if not for Debbie. Debbie was used by God to bring them together and to bring Denver out of homelessness. Denver was used by God to help Ron and to be strong for him. I wish I were more like Debbie.
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Alternating chapters, Hall and Moore weave together a single narrative of prejudice, redemption, love, and death. Hall is a well-to-do art dealer; Moore, a sharecropper turned vagrant. Their paths meet at a homeless mission in Fort Worth, Texas, where Hall’s wife (Debbie) serves with a fearless and relentless love – a love which serve as the impetus for Hall and Moore’s deep and lasting friendship. This compelling story calls into question many commonly held assumptions about homelessness, race, friendship, and struggles with God. B+
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meeting of unlikely people and the faith
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This is a book I read for a non-fiction reading group. I found it a compelling story, despite the fact that I'm not a believer in visitations by angels or dead people, both of which feature into the story. A deeply religious and wealthy couple from Fort Worth befriends a taciturn homeless ex-con. It's an unlikely friendship, but one that rings true, and it's written in the voices of the two men. I found Denver Moore's story at first sad but ultimately inspiring -- it's difficult coming to terms with the kind of poverty that is as deep as that in which he grew up. An amazing story, highly recommended.
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I really wanted to love this book that was supposed to be about helping a homeless man make something of his life. In reality, Denver Moore, the man who grew up as a Louisiana sharecropper and ended up on the streets of Ft. Worth, gave far more than he received. His story is inspirational and believable. He has retained his humility despite the success that his transformation earned him.Unfortunately, his liberator doesn't come off as well in the book, at least in the beginning. I would have stopped reading this if it hadn't been for a book group because it's difficult for me to trust a narrator with a puffed-up ego as big as the state of Texas! I hate to say it, but Ron Hall's transformation came at the expense of his wife, who was portrayed as an angel on earth. It's hard to know if this is true because she doesn't get to tell her story. She did get to deliver one of the book's best lines when Ron was rambling on about his Armani suits and his new Rolls-Royce. She asked him if that Rolls had a rearview mirror - and did he see a rock star when he looked in it. Loved it.This did turn out to be an inspiring story about prejudice, homelessness, forgiveness, suffering, and faith. With all of these worthy topics, it is understandable that the book is a little heavyhanded on the spiritual overtones. I wish the writing had been better and that it didn't focus so much on the tragedy that cemented the friendship. Still, it left me with a feeling of hope and that is certainly worth the price of a book.
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Great book. A story worth reading that is inspiring, beautiful, heartbreaking, touches your heart and opens your eyes. It is a book filled with emotion; be ready for laughs, tears and serious moments. It opens your heart and soul to what is real commitment and love. This book truly embraces the phrase “pay if forward”, and teaches us to never over look the people God brings into our life.................A wonderful book that I hope to bring to my book club.
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Read only a few chapters. Seemed it was going to be a little too self-righteous, so I took it back to the library. Maybe some other day...
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A Same Kind of Different As Me was slow to start . . . so slow I put it down after 65pages and have moved on.The writing is well, but the writer switches between two characters, but neither was anyone I cared anything about.I'm sorry that I couldn't read on, but it bored me and I put the book down.
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This is a true story about a homeless drifter, Denver Moore, who was a sharecropper, and a wealthy man, Ron Hall, who became an art dealer. They met through a woman named Debbie and wrote this book together. This book is well edited. The book alternates talking about each of the two main characters, and goes through the history of their lives. There is a third main character - "the unlikely woman who bound them together", and although she was discussed in passing in the first fifteen c ...more This is a true story about a homeless drifter, Denver Moore, who was a sharecropper, and a wealthy man, Ron Hall, who became an art dealer. They met through a woman named Debbie and wrote this book together. This book is well edited. The book alternates talking about each of the two main characters, and goes through the history of their lives. There is a third main character - "the unlikely woman who bound them together", and although she was discussed in passing in the first fifteen chapters, she didn't seem all that unlikely.The history is interesting enough, but it seems like there is only one suspense here, and that is, when do they meet and what they have in common? Maybe it is just my antsy mood this summer, but frankly, after fifteen chapters, I got tired of waiting, and decided that what they might have in common wasn't all that compelling. There are pictures in the back of the book, which told me the answer, and it is what I expected. This is a New York times bestseller, and supposed to be a really inspirational story, and maybe it is for some people. but I think it is one of those things that get so hyped up - a NYT bestseller and Barbara Bush even liked the book - that it can't live up to the hype, at least not for me.I got this book from Thomas Nelson in exchange of my review.
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Two things struck me about this book most strongly. First, despite the vernacular parts of it were written in, it was incredibly readable and I really enjoyed entering slightly more into the story through the non-proper English. Second, I found it a powerful testament to what sorts of transformations happen when the gospel infects people and gives them a real burden and real love that is invested for a long time into others. For that alone it is worth reading and contemplating.
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Received for review from Thomas Nelson publishers. A beautifully told  story of healing from both physical and spiritual injury and illness. The story begins with the origins of the two authors and chronicles their very different lives leading up to the point they are united through the charity work of Ron Hall's wife, Debbie. The story proceeds to tell a story of faith and courage in the face of daunting adversity as Ron learns to see the value in the unique individual, Denver learns to trust others and trust in his God-given gifts, and Debbie battles to stay alive long enough to see her husband and her friend meet the destiny God has laid before them to help the truly destitute and spread the word of God. This is a truly inspirational tale, rooted in fundamental Christianity as it can only be in Texas. However, the reader is not force-fed the gospel and the authors have done a great job of grounding their message in pure spirituality, not just Christian dogma.
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Ron is a successful rich white man, an art dealer in Fort Worth, Texas, and Denver is a Black homeless man, enslaved in the tenant farmer system of the South a generation ago. These two lives came together in a wondrous way to become a deep friendship based on strong faith and the love and guidance of Deborah, Ron's wife.
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Denver was raised a black youth in abject poverty in the heart of Louisiana's sharecropping community, growing himself into a sharecropper as a young man, as he knew nothing else, before one day escaping into homelessness and what he surprisingly views as a better life than what he's previously known, because at least he is free and no longer a "modern day slave".Ron is a successful art dealer living the American dream with a beautiful wife who has a heart of gold. While Ron and his wife Debbie are volunteering at a homeless shelter, Debbie determines that Ron needs to befriend the irascible and anti-social Denver. It takes some time, but eventually a friendship is born, shortly before heartbreak befalls them all.Debbie is portrayed in the book nothing short of a saint. She is selfless, God-fearing (and God-loving), patient, compassionate and kind. Based on a dream she had (and which she views as a vision from God), she pushes Ron to befriend Denver. Once Ron begins to build a relationship with Denver, he finally broaches the idea of he and Denver becoming "friends", to which follows a lovely moment when Denver shares his concerns over how white people practice "catch and release" when they go fishing, and he doesn't wish to be "caught and released" like one of those fish. Ron commits to keep Denver if he can catch him, and over the years their friendship grows into brotherhood.As their friendship builds, Ron is repeatedly struck by the small town wisdom of this illiterate sharecropper/homeless man.This book is 235 pages and 67 short chapters, which is how I prefer it. I only get to read is bursts, and I always appreciate having a good stopping point every few to a dozen pages. It also includes a Readers Guide, an Interview with the Authors, and a few pages of pictures.My final word: This book was moving and inspiring. It goes beyond the trappings of life to the heart of the matter, and is proof that two people can move beyond societal lines to forge a lasting friendship that can weather any storm. And behind it all is a humble woman small of frame and great of spirit.
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An interesting memoir in that it covers the lives of three individuals rather than one, and is told by two of those people. Ron Hall and Denver Moore are the narrators, two men from very different walks of life who are drawn together by Deborah Hall, Ron's wife. They alternate telling the story, so each chapter is in first person, but switches from Ron's perspective to Denver's. Ron is an art dealer who managed to acquire vast sums of money through his business, while Denver is a homeless man, having run away from his slave-like existence as a sharecropper down south. Deborah drags her husband to a mission in down town Fort Worth, where they live, and the two men meet. The memoir focuses a bit on the childhood and early adult years of Ron and Denver, to set their backgrounds, but devotes much more time to the period after they meet and beyond. The narrators also spend time telling Deborah's story, as she was the instrument in bringing both men together. Her compassion led her husband into a life about God's mercy, rather than money, and her love showed Denver light after being surrounded by darkness for so long. It is a surprising story, how two men are redeemed from very different places, and a sweet story, of friendship and love. It will also make you cry. Definitely worth a read, to see a Godly way of reaching out to the homeless, and a lesson in a life that can be lived in humility and love.
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A true story about how a wealthy Caucasian couple, Ron and Deborah Hall, came to befriend a down-on-his-luck Af-Am man, Denver Moore, in modern-day Texas. Deborah has a persistent faith that compels her husband Ron to repent of sins in his personal life and to join her as she reaches out to the poor in her community. They volunteer once a week at a local soup kitchen, where they meet Denver. The chapters alternate between first-person narratives of Ron and Denver, and their stories kept my interest. Part of the reason for this is that the book was well written and not sappy, and it had some very humorous dialog and passages. No doubt this was due to the deft touch of Lynn Vincent, who apparently served as a ghost writer or editor and helped them shape their stories.There were things that bothered me about this book, but not enough to put it down. I usually don't like stories that feature unrealistic characters, and by that I mean people who are extremely smart or extremely rich or extremely good looking or extremely anything, because such characters and their stories are so hard for me to relate to. I’m not interested in reading stories about people with such advantages, as I rarely find that they have much of anything to teach me about life -- and that is something I look for when I select a book to read. As a main character, Ron came dangerously close to that, but what redeemed him for me were his failings, some of them pretty major. SPOILER ALERT!: While the death of his wife was very sad, I think he was still too raw when he wrote about it -- it was still too consuming, he had yet to put it into perspective.I would recommend this as a good book to read, especially if you (like me) often find yourself wondering if you can do more to help others than you currently are. Here are two people who took one small step in that direction, were faithful and consistent in doing so, and suddenly were presented with the opportunity to make a real difference in someone else's life. Lucky them!
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I think that this was one of the best most insprialtional books I have read in a very long time...I love the approach of how God works and even if you do not follow a particular religion you will find this book very uplifting
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Rated: AGreat book! Perhaps living and working in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area and having spent much of my childhood in the old South made the book more special to me. In many ways, I could relate to Ron and Debbie Hall's life -- from their lives, to thier successes and struggles, to their fight against cancer, to their ministry to the "least of these". I found myself laughing and crying from chapter to chapter. Romans 8:28.
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Great book! A must read for everyone.
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I like usually like true stories, but this one got a little preachy. I am sure Deborah was a good person, but her "perfection" and "goodness" and unending charity got a little nauseating.
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very interesting and inspirational
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I was really engrossed in this book until about halfway through, and then it got very "preachy." I understand that God and religion had a huge influence in the author's life, but honestly, it got repetitive.
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A moving story, but it tries a little too hard and doesn't fully flesh out Ron Hall's personal transformation or really make clear the actual work that's been achieved because of his friendship with Denver Moore. How many people are being helped by the ministry and services? How expansive are their efforts? How effective? I mean, it's lovely that they've got this friendship, but what have they accomplished, really?
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Uplifting and inspiring. I think this would make a better movie.
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This book was so good it's hard to believe that it is non-fiction! The story of Denver and Ron touched so deep into my soul I don't think I'll soon forget their story. It was such a good reminder of how different everyone's struggles are and reinforces the lesson of judging others. This book made me realize that I need to do more to give back to others. We can wish for miracles all day or ask God to make a difference in the lives of others but ultimately it is in our hands to make that difference and do his work here on earth. Of course it is through his strength that we have been given any of our gifts but make no mistake, we are his hands, that is what we were put on this earth to do. The writing style of Denver's side takes a little getting used to but it is such a touching story and so worth it. I'd recommend this book to everyone!
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