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This contemporary classic gets a limited edition makeover with movie art and a new preface from Donald Miller.

In print for nearly a decade, Blue Like Jazz has earned a coveted spot on readers’ shelves and in their hearts. Many have said that Donald Miller expressed exactly what they were feeling but couldn’t find the words to say themselves. In this landmark book that changed what people expected from Christian writers, that changed what people needed for their spiritual journeys, Donald Miller takes readers through a real life striving to understand relationship with God.

Heartwarming and hilarious, poignant and unexpected, Blue Like Jazz has become a contemporary classic.

For anyone wondering if the Christian faith is still relevant in a postmodern culture, thirsting for a genuine encounter with a God who is real, or yearning for a renewed sense of passion in life . . . Blue Like Jazz is a fresh and original perspective on life, love, and redemption.

Topics: Jazz, Christianity, Redemption, Love, Inspirational, and Creative Nonfiction

Published: Thomas Nelson on Apr 10, 2012
ISBN: 9781400204595
List price: $16.99
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Just plain Awesome! Finally someone who tells it like it is!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Miller's observations here are usually quite good and insightful. He strives to look at Christian spirituality from a new postmodern angle. The result is considerably better than what most emmergant church thinkers are producing. If I have a complaint, it is that in criticizing Christianity's intolerance towards liberals and homosexuals, he shows remarkable intolerance himself for conservative Christians. He speaks long and hard about love and accepting people, but the only people he really seems to accept are those people like himself. Tolerance is the greatest virtue in his world, and so ultimately I think he is creating a Jesus that looks more like him rather than trying to form himself to look more like Jesus. Still, it is a worthy read, as long as you can stand back from Miller's view and realize that it is not necessarily the vision of Christ.read more
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i do have opnions on this book and his thoughts on "christian spirituality". I was troubled because it's an extremely popular book and highly recommended. anyway, that said, i was really taken aback by the selfish version of "christianity" that I read in the pages. I'm not saying that he's not a christian or that he needs to follow Christ just like me. but i am saying that his take on the Bible, on "fundamental Christians" and on the spiritual disciplines left me concerned about the message he was giving to these who were searching, who were new believers etc. He emphasizes finding something that fits YOUR taste, YOUR interest, YOUR style. He emphasizes that you just be yourself - smoking pipes, not studying Scripture, drinking, smoking and cussing - without even considering whether that honors the Lord or not - in fact, he makes it amusing in the case of these cussing, smoking pastors and he puts down the 'fundamental' christians who are 'trying' to live holy lives. He doesn't hide his hostility and criticism of 'fundamental christians". Btw, he characterizes these christians as those who "behave as if they loved light and not 'behave' as if they loved the darkness." He said he was one once - and he said he was absolutely ashamed to admit it now. His quote "We would fast all the time, pray together twice each day, memorize Scripture, pat each other on the back....we read a great deal of Scripture and hadn't gotten anybody pregnant." anyway, it's hard for me to explain why i think this book is misleading and yes, even dangerous. His style is readable, entertaining, humorous, pensive and even inviting. But his search is for a religion that suits his hippy, cool, 'beautiful dude', political activist style of 'spirituality' that doesn't have a whole lot of Scriptural truth to it - he has his epiphanies and aha moments but they don't seem much more than philosophical eye-openers. oh, i could go on. i do pray the Lord uses this book to draw many to Himself - but I wouldn't ever recommend it and you will do well to stay away from this fluff. (ok, was that too harsh? i usually am not so critical of books! but this drew something out in me very strongly). hope i didn't offend anyone who LOVED this book. it just didn't cut it for me.read more
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Just plain Awesome! Finally someone who tells it like it is!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Miller's observations here are usually quite good and insightful. He strives to look at Christian spirituality from a new postmodern angle. The result is considerably better than what most emmergant church thinkers are producing. If I have a complaint, it is that in criticizing Christianity's intolerance towards liberals and homosexuals, he shows remarkable intolerance himself for conservative Christians. He speaks long and hard about love and accepting people, but the only people he really seems to accept are those people like himself. Tolerance is the greatest virtue in his world, and so ultimately I think he is creating a Jesus that looks more like him rather than trying to form himself to look more like Jesus. Still, it is a worthy read, as long as you can stand back from Miller's view and realize that it is not necessarily the vision of Christ.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
i do have opnions on this book and his thoughts on "christian spirituality". I was troubled because it's an extremely popular book and highly recommended. anyway, that said, i was really taken aback by the selfish version of "christianity" that I read in the pages. I'm not saying that he's not a christian or that he needs to follow Christ just like me. but i am saying that his take on the Bible, on "fundamental Christians" and on the spiritual disciplines left me concerned about the message he was giving to these who were searching, who were new believers etc. He emphasizes finding something that fits YOUR taste, YOUR interest, YOUR style. He emphasizes that you just be yourself - smoking pipes, not studying Scripture, drinking, smoking and cussing - without even considering whether that honors the Lord or not - in fact, he makes it amusing in the case of these cussing, smoking pastors and he puts down the 'fundamental' christians who are 'trying' to live holy lives. He doesn't hide his hostility and criticism of 'fundamental christians". Btw, he characterizes these christians as those who "behave as if they loved light and not 'behave' as if they loved the darkness." He said he was one once - and he said he was absolutely ashamed to admit it now. His quote "We would fast all the time, pray together twice each day, memorize Scripture, pat each other on the back....we read a great deal of Scripture and hadn't gotten anybody pregnant." anyway, it's hard for me to explain why i think this book is misleading and yes, even dangerous. His style is readable, entertaining, humorous, pensive and even inviting. But his search is for a religion that suits his hippy, cool, 'beautiful dude', political activist style of 'spirituality' that doesn't have a whole lot of Scriptural truth to it - he has his epiphanies and aha moments but they don't seem much more than philosophical eye-openers. oh, i could go on. i do pray the Lord uses this book to draw many to Himself - but I wouldn't ever recommend it and you will do well to stay away from this fluff. (ok, was that too harsh? i usually am not so critical of books! but this drew something out in me very strongly). hope i didn't offend anyone who LOVED this book. it just didn't cut it for me.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really enjoyed this book by Miller. He can really minister to certain groups of people with this book and I really agree with alot of the things he says. Fundamentalists would cuss him to his face, but he says some great things. Living for Jesus isn't being a republican and going to church according to Miller. Read it and hear what he has to say.
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interesting perspective. difficult to read at first due to his writing style. great thoughts to ponder about how our christian walk can influence non christians, getting outside our christian life bubble.
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I bought this book on a whim. I liked the title. I liked the cover. I liked the description of the author (in one of the blurbs) as "Anne Lamott with testosterone." And I loved the author's note:"I never liked jazz music because jazz music doesn't resolve. But I was outside the Bagdad Theater in Portland one night when I saw a man playing the saxophone. I stood there for fifteen minutes, and he never opened his eyes. After that I liked jazz music. Sometimes you have to watch somebody love something before you can love it yourself. It is as if they are showing you the way. I used to not like God because God didn't resolve. But that was before any of this happened."This book is a bit uneven in quality. Some of these autobiographical essays were less than impressive to me. But others stopped me in my tracks. This is a book with which many Conservative Christians might be uncomfortable. Miller has his complaints about the church, and about the way many Christians view faith and interact with those around them -- especially those who are different from them. He has no use for empty ritual (though its clear that not all ritual is empty to him), or being judgmental of others, or of the kind of morality that is almost obsessed with sexual behavior.He does acknowledge the reality of what traditional theology calls "original sin" -- the fact that all people, and the world, are broken and need fixing (the need for salvation). He zeroes in on the sins of self-righteousness and self-centeredness, and the primacy of the commandment to LOVE. In this, I believe he is a faithful follower of Jesus.He has problems with religion, with Christianity (as an institution), with "religious people," but loves and has faith in Jesus and invites the reader to love Him, too. He does all this with an honesty about his own failings and shortcomings that is refreshing. He gave me some things to think about, so I consider the time spent in reading this book worthwhile.
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