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At first, Ken Abraham wrote off his mother's changes in behavior as quirks that just come with old age. There was memory loss, physical decline, hygiene issues, paranoia, and uncharacteristic attitudes. He soon realized that dementia had changed her life—and his familiy's—forever.

"How is it possible to lose a loved one while he or she is still living, still sitting right in front of you, talking with you, smiling at you—and yet the person you have known and loved for years is somehow gone?"

According to the Alzheimer's Association, an estimated 5.4 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer's disease. That's one in eight older Americans. More than likely, that figure includes someone you know and love.

As he chronicles his own mother's degenerative condition, New York Times best-selling writer Ken Abraham educates while offering inspiration to help readers cope with and manage their family circumstances. With humor and spiritual reminders of God's command to honor our parents, Abraham encourages readers through often-difficult responsibilities. And though in most cases patients will not recover this side of heaven, he suggests many practical things that families can do to make the experience safer, kinder, and more endurable for everyone involved.

When Your parent Becomes Your Child tells the story of one family's journey through dementia while offering hope to family members and friends, that they might better understand the effects of the disease. Dont let this catch you by surprise—be informed before you face the challenges and difficulties of a loved one with Alzheimer's or dementia. This book can help.

Published: Thomas Nelson on
ISBN: 9780849949944
List price: $8.99
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I am very happy that I was given the chance to review Ken Abraham's book 'When Your Parent Becomes Your Child'. Before reading this book I had always associated Dementia with Alzheimer's. I just assumed that they were one in the same, but they are not. Dementia is a cluster of symptoms (memory loss, forgetting how to do something or care for yourself), where Alzheimer's is a specific medical disease that has many of the symptoms of Dementia.

I enjoyed reading Ken's book. I have learned things about the illness that I never knew before. I am fortunate in that I haven't had to go through anything like this with either one of my parents, and I hope that I don't have to. In this book shares his mother's illness with us and her day to day life, care and quality of life.

Once Ken's mother came to visit with his family for a bit and woke him up in the middle of the night saying that there were men in white coats outside her window. Ken assured her there were not. He even went so far as to take her outside in the dark so she could look for herself.

Ken and his siblings overlooked many things at first and decided it was just old age. Such as their mother having a wreck because she forgot which pedal was for the gas and which pedal was for the break. She would forget to take her medicine or take to little or no enough. Accusing people of stealing from her all the time, to hoarding. She would have out burst and say inappropriate and sometimes hurtful things to people. She would even curse at times, something that she never had done before.

Ken talks about how he denied to himself that nothing was wrong with his mother, even when others noticed things he didn't. He talks about coming to terms with his mothers illness, deciding on her care and where she would live. He wanted the best care possible for his mother, but also care that was affordable.

I can only try to imagine how hard it was on his mother also. To go from caring for yourself and being independent to not being able to bathe, dress or care for yourself properly. This illness had to be frustrating for everyone. It would be a lot to shoulder caring for a parent with Dementia or Alzheimers and to help them keep their dignity also.

Throughout the book Ken talks about his mothers love for singing gospel songs and playing the piano. Even with her illness it seems she never forgot how to play the piano or the words to all the songs she loved. Ken's book is a must read for anyone that is caring for a parent. Even if you are not caring for you parent it is a wonderful book to read to help understand the illness. I enjoyed reading this book. It was sad at times because I kept thinking to myself "what if this were my mother?"
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Reviews

I am very happy that I was given the chance to review Ken Abraham's book 'When Your Parent Becomes Your Child'. Before reading this book I had always associated Dementia with Alzheimer's. I just assumed that they were one in the same, but they are not. Dementia is a cluster of symptoms (memory loss, forgetting how to do something or care for yourself), where Alzheimer's is a specific medical disease that has many of the symptoms of Dementia.

I enjoyed reading Ken's book. I have learned things about the illness that I never knew before. I am fortunate in that I haven't had to go through anything like this with either one of my parents, and I hope that I don't have to. In this book shares his mother's illness with us and her day to day life, care and quality of life.

Once Ken's mother came to visit with his family for a bit and woke him up in the middle of the night saying that there were men in white coats outside her window. Ken assured her there were not. He even went so far as to take her outside in the dark so she could look for herself.

Ken and his siblings overlooked many things at first and decided it was just old age. Such as their mother having a wreck because she forgot which pedal was for the gas and which pedal was for the break. She would forget to take her medicine or take to little or no enough. Accusing people of stealing from her all the time, to hoarding. She would have out burst and say inappropriate and sometimes hurtful things to people. She would even curse at times, something that she never had done before.

Ken talks about how he denied to himself that nothing was wrong with his mother, even when others noticed things he didn't. He talks about coming to terms with his mothers illness, deciding on her care and where she would live. He wanted the best care possible for his mother, but also care that was affordable.

I can only try to imagine how hard it was on his mother also. To go from caring for yourself and being independent to not being able to bathe, dress or care for yourself properly. This illness had to be frustrating for everyone. It would be a lot to shoulder caring for a parent with Dementia or Alzheimers and to help them keep their dignity also.

Throughout the book Ken talks about his mothers love for singing gospel songs and playing the piano. Even with her illness it seems she never forgot how to play the piano or the words to all the songs she loved. Ken's book is a must read for anyone that is caring for a parent. Even if you are not caring for you parent it is a wonderful book to read to help understand the illness. I enjoyed reading this book. It was sad at times because I kept thinking to myself "what if this were my mother?"
more
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