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From the Publisher

The Frugal Woman is not cheap. She's a cost-conscious, savvy consumer who avoids wasting her time, her money, and her energy on things she does not need. She's organized about her money management, spending, and household planning. She makes decisions based on her own needs and values. She's in control of her life.

The Frugal Woman dresses her kids in brand-name clothes, gets her hair done in salons, buys antique furniture eats gourmet meals, gives gifts that wow her friends and family - and all the while socks money away in her savings and retirement account, living free of credit card debt, and feeling secure about tomorrow while enjoying today.

The Frugal Woman's Guide to a Rich Life tells how to be just such a Frugal Woman - how to make the best use of what you already have, how to identify what you really need in your life (and what you don't), how to get the necessities (and even a few luxuries) for less, and how to cut down on your and the earth's wasted resources.

Topics: Money Management , Organization, Prescriptive, Informative, Guides, and Inspirational

Published: Thomas Nelson on
ISBN: 9781418586270
List price: $7.99
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