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Your right to pursue happiness has been revoked by Big Government.

Thousands of pages of regulations, millions of employees, and trillions of tax dollars . . . Big Government is bigger than ever, and as this bloated behemoth continues to fatten up and stretch out, it squeezes America's entrepreneurs, workers, and families - cutting our choices, limiting our opportunities, and squelching our right to pursue happiness.

Every year, taxes increase, regulations pile higher, the cost of living goes up - and our quality of life suffers. So with everyone obsessing about the obesity problem in America, isn't it time we looked at the fat, flabby, overstretched, and overbloated behemoth that is American government?

Size Matters shows through facts, figures, and head-spinning stories that as government increases in quantity, we all suffer a loss in life quality. Miller reveals the damning details of Big Government's impact on the lives of ordinary Americans. How it . . .

  • reduces family income
  • drives up the cost of housing, healthcare, and most every other consumer product or service
  • hurts employment
  • misdirects entrepreneurial efforts
  • stifles vital marketplace creativity and innovation

Bristling with drama and data, Size Matters reveals the real daily drawbacks of Big Government. It comes down to this . . .

Big Government = Huge Problem. Size really does matter.

"Miller explains how government overregulation and porkbarrelling are costing Americans money and freedom while politicians and special interests line their pockets. This book should be a political call to arms."
-Glenn Reynolds, Instapundit.com; author of An Army of Davids

"Great sport! Imagine Thomas Frank if he actually told the truth. Accessible, entertaining, informative, and relevant in the best sense of the word. Read this book and you'll never lose an argument to a liberal again."
-Jack Cashill, author of Hoodwinked and Sucker Punch

"Miller will make you excited about the potential of America-and spitting mad that Big Government keeps tripping us up."
-Star Parker, author of Uncle Sam's Plantation

"Who knew that reading about rapacious government growth could be so delectable?"
-Nick Gillespie, editor-in-chief, Reason

Published: Thomas Nelson on Jan 3, 2006
ISBN: 9781418551735
List price: $14.99
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Abortion aside, those on the political left who usually claim to be for choice, are proven not to be in this 2006 book by Joel Miller. But lest you think this is a partisan work, singling out Progressives, he takes more time to point out the short comings of Republican failures - from Nixon to Bush 43 - the author is likely a Libertarian. Wielding the quill-tipped sword, spilling ink, he slays sacred cows of Social Security, cartelization and other "Big Government" forms to remove choice from Americans and subtly stifle our quest for happiness.Illustrating his ideas with countless references to Founding Fathers and thinkers of their era to more contemporary economists, he begins by proving how equal justice by virtue of understandable common law for every citizen is lost when the the 2004 Federal Register totals about 75,676 pages! Even worse, non elected bureaucrats write and enforce regulations, their manual's (I use the term lightly) 147,639 pages measures to "more than twenty feet of shelf space." These are laws and regulations which hold us criminally responsible, even if there was no intent for malfeasance; the regulations add cost to business, and by virtue of obedience (for fear of penalty) divert money from growth or employee compensation.The second sections detail the "small" business owner. Readers familiar with Walter E. Williams will be familiar with the chapter on cabbies and hairbraiders who - working class people - are or nearly are kept out of the entrepreneur class by way of government regulations and unnecessary licensing. Mr. Miller elaborates on how government red tape works to inflate housing costs and drives residents from California and other high tax states.He writes in an enjoyable fashion, keeps the potentially dry information lighthearted and backs up his views with figures where necessary and quotes from myriad of sources. Mr. Miller deftly destroys Professor Barry Schwartz's notion that we are offered too many choices and are harmed by this mental torment. When Prof. Schwartz wrote in his book that he simply wished the Gap only sold one style of jeans, "the kind that used to be the only kind", Mr. Miller retorts "[m]ore choice doesn't mean less satisfaction. Rather more choice means less satisfaction for Schwartz." This ties in with Prof. Schwartz's op-ed piece against then-President Bush's idea to semi-privatize Social Security. Mr. Schwartz suggested options of alternative savings plans would overwhelm American's and make us unhappy. What it did was take away a choice, leaving a wide sector of citizens one choice... involuntarily contribute via payroll taxes to Social Security or live under minimum security.This is a book of limited government, removing lobbyists and reducing obscure and unfathomable law (both of which are used to benefit one group over another, thereby removing the equal protection notion of American jurisprudence) in an attempt to instill untethered personally directed pursuit of happiness as the Founders intended.read more
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Abortion aside, those on the political left who usually claim to be for choice, are proven not to be in this 2006 book by Joel Miller. But lest you think this is a partisan work, singling out Progressives, he takes more time to point out the short comings of Republican failures - from Nixon to Bush 43 - the author is likely a Libertarian. Wielding the quill-tipped sword, spilling ink, he slays sacred cows of Social Security, cartelization and other "Big Government" forms to remove choice from Americans and subtly stifle our quest for happiness.Illustrating his ideas with countless references to Founding Fathers and thinkers of their era to more contemporary economists, he begins by proving how equal justice by virtue of understandable common law for every citizen is lost when the the 2004 Federal Register totals about 75,676 pages! Even worse, non elected bureaucrats write and enforce regulations, their manual's (I use the term lightly) 147,639 pages measures to "more than twenty feet of shelf space." These are laws and regulations which hold us criminally responsible, even if there was no intent for malfeasance; the regulations add cost to business, and by virtue of obedience (for fear of penalty) divert money from growth or employee compensation.The second sections detail the "small" business owner. Readers familiar with Walter E. Williams will be familiar with the chapter on cabbies and hairbraiders who - working class people - are or nearly are kept out of the entrepreneur class by way of government regulations and unnecessary licensing. Mr. Miller elaborates on how government red tape works to inflate housing costs and drives residents from California and other high tax states.He writes in an enjoyable fashion, keeps the potentially dry information lighthearted and backs up his views with figures where necessary and quotes from myriad of sources. Mr. Miller deftly destroys Professor Barry Schwartz's notion that we are offered too many choices and are harmed by this mental torment. When Prof. Schwartz wrote in his book that he simply wished the Gap only sold one style of jeans, "the kind that used to be the only kind", Mr. Miller retorts "[m]ore choice doesn't mean less satisfaction. Rather more choice means less satisfaction for Schwartz." This ties in with Prof. Schwartz's op-ed piece against then-President Bush's idea to semi-privatize Social Security. Mr. Schwartz suggested options of alternative savings plans would overwhelm American's and make us unhappy. What it did was take away a choice, leaving a wide sector of citizens one choice... involuntarily contribute via payroll taxes to Social Security or live under minimum security.This is a book of limited government, removing lobbyists and reducing obscure and unfathomable law (both of which are used to benefit one group over another, thereby removing the equal protection notion of American jurisprudence) in an attempt to instill untethered personally directed pursuit of happiness as the Founders intended.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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