From the Publisher

In this newly revised edition of the classic bestseller For Better or for Best, Gary Smalley speaks to women and explains what motivates men and how wives can use their natural qualities and abilities to build a better marriage.

Using case histories and biblical illustrations, as well as stories from his own marriage, Smalley offers empathy, humor, and wisdom to women who wish to more fully understand their husbands and love them better. 

With over 750,000 copies in print and now updated and expanded to integrate the latest research and cultural changes for today’s readers, For Better or for Best offers women an insider’s perspective into the world of men, including practical help and application so they can deepen their relationships with their husbands and build a lasting marriage.

Topics: Marriage, Family, Communication, Love, Informative, and Guides

Published: Zondervan on
ISBN: 9780310599296
List price: $10.39
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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