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Has modern scholarship debunked the traditional Christ? Has the church suppressed the truth about Jesus to advance its own agenda? What if the real Jesus is far different from the atoning Savior worshipped through the centuries?

In The Case for the Real Jesus, former award-winning legal editor Lee Strobel explores such hot-button questions as:
• Did the church suppress ancient non-biblical documents that paint a more accurate picture of Jesus than the four Gospels?
• Did the church distort the truth about Jesus by tampering with early New Testament texts?
• Do new insights and explanations finally disprove the resurrection?
• Have fresh arguments disqualified Jesus from being the Messiah?
• Did Christianity steal its core ideas from earlier mythology?

Evaluate the arguments and evidence being advanced by prominent atheists, liberal theologians, Muslim scholars, and others. Sift through expert testimony. Then reach your own verdict in The Case for the Real Jesus.
Published: Zondervan on
ISBN: 9780310565710
List price: $11.99
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Amazing book with a lot of good evidence and clear investigation. Many people talk about their own theory about Jesus, mainly based on media and press articles, movies, etc. It's about time that we get deep down thorough all this theories and find the truth. Great reading! more
Full of info and very deep in meaningmore
This book follows Strobel's characteristic journalistic style in interviewing experts to examine the evidence against common objections to Christianity, this time concentrating on claims about Jesus' identity or the Bible having been altered or tampered with by the Church in some way as to make them historically inaccurate. The book covers some of the same ground as "The Case for Christ," repeating some of its information on the feasibility of Christ's having survived His crucifixion and on how He fulfilled Jewish Messianic prophecies, but through interviews with different experts on those subjects. These sections may seem like old hat to those who have read every one of Strobel's books, but they are supplemented by new information on the specific "new documents" being touted as evidence against the reliability of the Gospels, such as the Gospel of Thomas or the Secret Gospel of Mark, as well as by comparisons between Christianity and pagan religions whose god-figures or rituals have been claimed to parallel New Testament beliefs. This information may prove useful to Christians who have been confronted with these claims and didn't have enough information to answer them, although Strobel even seems to concede the point in his book that most of these objections have been raised for the past thousand years or more, and they simply keep being rehashed (thus, there are already plenty of sources out there on how to deal with them). What I did find most interesting in this book from a Christian perspective was a discussion on the evangelical tendency to equate Christ with the Bible and thus elevate the actual words of Scripture themselves to an idolatrous level of worship. The distinction made in this book between the infallibility and inerrancy of Scripture, and discussion of what it means for the Bible to be inspired by God, were deeper and more nuanced than I have encountered in the past and left a lot of food for thought. Though I am not sure I agree with all that was said, I think it opened a good door for discussion.Those who are not Christians will find this book equally as useful as the original "Case for Christ," whether or not you have read that. This is easily Strobel's best book since that earlier volume. The objections are dealt with fairly clearly and the Gospel is presented in almost every chapter. If you have not read a Strobel book, "The Case for Christ" is better, but if this book addresses a specific question you have been wondering about, it will not disappoint you.more
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Reviews

Amazing book with a lot of good evidence and clear investigation. Many people talk about their own theory about Jesus, mainly based on media and press articles, movies, etc. It's about time that we get deep down thorough all this theories and find the truth. Great reading! more
Full of info and very deep in meaningmore
This book follows Strobel's characteristic journalistic style in interviewing experts to examine the evidence against common objections to Christianity, this time concentrating on claims about Jesus' identity or the Bible having been altered or tampered with by the Church in some way as to make them historically inaccurate. The book covers some of the same ground as "The Case for Christ," repeating some of its information on the feasibility of Christ's having survived His crucifixion and on how He fulfilled Jewish Messianic prophecies, but through interviews with different experts on those subjects. These sections may seem like old hat to those who have read every one of Strobel's books, but they are supplemented by new information on the specific "new documents" being touted as evidence against the reliability of the Gospels, such as the Gospel of Thomas or the Secret Gospel of Mark, as well as by comparisons between Christianity and pagan religions whose god-figures or rituals have been claimed to parallel New Testament beliefs. This information may prove useful to Christians who have been confronted with these claims and didn't have enough information to answer them, although Strobel even seems to concede the point in his book that most of these objections have been raised for the past thousand years or more, and they simply keep being rehashed (thus, there are already plenty of sources out there on how to deal with them). What I did find most interesting in this book from a Christian perspective was a discussion on the evangelical tendency to equate Christ with the Bible and thus elevate the actual words of Scripture themselves to an idolatrous level of worship. The distinction made in this book between the infallibility and inerrancy of Scripture, and discussion of what it means for the Bible to be inspired by God, were deeper and more nuanced than I have encountered in the past and left a lot of food for thought. Though I am not sure I agree with all that was said, I think it opened a good door for discussion.Those who are not Christians will find this book equally as useful as the original "Case for Christ," whether or not you have read that. This is easily Strobel's best book since that earlier volume. The objections are dealt with fairly clearly and the Gospel is presented in almost every chapter. If you have not read a Strobel book, "The Case for Christ" is better, but if this book addresses a specific question you have been wondering about, it will not disappoint you.more
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