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The blockbuster modern science classic that introduced the butterfly effect to the world—even more relevant two decades after it became an international sensation

For centuries, scientific thought was focused on bringing order to the natural world. But even as relativity and quantum mechanics undermined that rigid certainty in the first half of the twentieth century, the scientific community clung to the idea that any system, no matter how complex, could be reduced to a simple pattern. In the 1960s, a small group of radical thinkers began to take that notion apart, placing new importance on the tiny experimental irregularities that scientists had long learned to ignore. Miniscule differences in data, they said, would eventually produce massive ones—and complex systems like the weather, economics, and human behavior suddenly became clearer and more beautiful than they had ever been before.   In this seminal work of scientific writing, James Gleick lays out a cutting edge field of science with enough grace and precision that any reader will be able to grasp the science behind the beautiful complexity of the world around us.

Topics: Mathematics, Popular Science, Physics, Education, Space, Experiments, Scientists, Informative, Contemplative, Poignant, Cognitive Science, Essays, Illustrated, and Guides

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781453210475
List price: $14.99
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A very influential book, which brought the ideas of deterministic chaos to public notice. A best-seller for awhile.more
As I recall (it's been decades since I read this, and I'm planning on reading "The Information"), it's a pretty good book. Lots of fractal stuff in it of course.more
I'm not a scientist, but I found this book both readable and fascinating. Gleick delves deep into some pretty abstruse subjects, but he keeps his finger on the human stories behind them and drives his history forward. Recommended.more
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Reviews

A very influential book, which brought the ideas of deterministic chaos to public notice. A best-seller for awhile.more
As I recall (it's been decades since I read this, and I'm planning on reading "The Information"), it's a pretty good book. Lots of fractal stuff in it of course.more
I'm not a scientist, but I found this book both readable and fascinating. Gleick delves deep into some pretty abstruse subjects, but he keeps his finger on the human stories behind them and drives his history forward. Recommended.more
Although the book slowed down in spots it still was very exciting. I loved reading about how non linear systems or Chaos slowly emerged to change the face of many disciplines today. Being a consultant it makes me take a fresh look at the way I view and interpret data looking for strange attractors and other things. It was very interesting to see how many of the pioneers of this new science had no mentors or support within their communities. As a matter of fact many of them were warned that studying a new discipline would not bode well for their careers.more
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