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Alice Walker’s masterpiece, a powerful novel of courage in the face of oppression
 
Celie has grown up in rural Georgia, navigating a childhood of ceaseless abuse. Not only is she poor and despised by the society around her, she’s badly treated by her family. As a teenager she begins writing letters directly to God in an attempt to transcend a life that often seems too much to bear. Her letters span twenty years and record a journey of self-discovery and empowerment through the guiding light of a few strong women and her own implacable will to find harmony with herself and her home.

The Color Purple’s deeply inspirational narrative, coupled with Walker’s prodigious talent as a stylist and storyteller, have made the novel a contemporary classic of American letters. 

This ebook features a new introduction written by the author on the twenty-fifth anniversary of publication, and an illustrated biography of Alice Walker including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

Topics: United States of America, Race Relations, Family, American South, Georgia, 1930s, Epistolary Novels, Realistic, Heartfelt, Feminism, Sisters, Sexual Abuse, Sexuality, Spirituality , LGBTQ, Adoption, African American Culture & Characters, Segregation, Siblings, Poverty, Discrimination, Social Class, Realism, Female Author, American Author, Sexism, Made into a Movie, Domestic Abuse, and Bisexuality

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Sep 20, 2011
ISBN: 9781453223970
List price: $14.99
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awesome read very highly recommend for reading also the film is recommended read more
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This book is great, it was a fantastic read!read more
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awesome read very highly recommend for reading also the film is recommended
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Cool
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This book is great, it was a fantastic read!
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This was pretty good book. I found the dialect difficult to grasp at first, and I couldn't connect emotionally with Celie until about half way through the book, which is when the story really picked up. I adored the story of Nettie's journey, and it definitely enhanced the plot. I found the names hard to keep track of at times, and the family connections were insanely complicated, but for the most part, it was good. I expected it to focus a lot on racism, but it was more about the family relationships than anything else. It was a very interesting read, and I thought the ending was very fitting.
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A good listen. I am not sure which I liked better, book or movie. They are both good. Both worth while.
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The Color Purple is about the life journey of a girl named Celie. She puts up with a life of abuse, first by her stepfather, then by her husband, until Shug (her husband's lover) befriends her. Celie and Shug also become lovers, and Celie finds the strength to leave her husband. She then begins to discover what an independent life can really be like.The book is very well-written. The characters are believable, dynamic, and well-developed. The book seems to have two natural parts: before Celie left her husband and after she left her husband. The first part describes how Celie and the other women characters deal with different forms of abuse. One tolerates it, one runs away, and another fights back. After Celie leaves her husband, the book chronicles her attempts to reconnect with her sister and her attempts at self-sufficiency.The most ironically symbolic part is Nettie's trek to Africa as a missionary. Although Africa is the motherland of the African-Americans, Nettie and the other black missionaries do not fit in with the Olinka tribe any better than Celie fits in with her own husband's family. The missionaries are barely tolerated at best. Once drastic changes overcome the tribe, Nettie and her family finally move back home to reconnect with her sister, Celie. This sad failure dramatically demonstrates how many of the descendants of slaves did not seem to fit in anywhere - even with their own people. As a result of these displaced characters, this book questions the entire idea of family - What is it (despite of its imperfections) and how does one know when one has it? Who are our "people" and how do we know we belong to them? Does "belonging" mean having the correct blood lines, marriage documents, or titles of property... or does "belonging" occur when one's soul is aligned with another?
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