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A trove of short stories featuring 2 of the Jazz Age’s most famous sleuths

In the annals of mystery writing, Lord Peter Wimsey and Montague Egg are among the most memorable detectives. Lord Peter—noble by birth, brilliant by nature—is a fly in the ointment of criminals across Britain, turning up whenever the police ask him to lend his quick wit and keen eye to an investigation. Montague Egg is a free-spirited figure, a traveling wine salesman with an unfortunate habit of stumbling over murder scenes. Both are inimitably charming, and neither has ever failed to catch his man.
 
In this collection of stories, the 2 detectives confront cat killers, American zombies, and—most horrible of all—a poisoned bottle of fine old port. Several decades after their first publication, mystery maven Dorothy L. Sayers’s chilling puzzles remain as engaging as ever.
 
Hangman’s Holiday is the 9th book in the Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries, but you may enjoy the series by reading the books in any order.
 
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy L. Sayers including rare images from the Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College.

Topics: Short stories, 1920s, England, Suspenseful, Witty, Private Investigators, Murder, Crime, Police, 20th Century, Breezy, Female Author, and British Author

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781453258927
List price: $9.99
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This collection of 12 short stories, predominantly featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Montague Egg, are a gentle introduction to Ms. Sayers’ writing. Each is neatly self-contained and the answer revealed in a gentlemanly flourish without arrogance (such as that of M. Poirot).I’ve not read any Sayers before, but after Alex was raving about a Wimsey mystery, this little collection was just right. The short stories are a bit shorter (12 in 256 pages) than the set of Christie short stories I reviewed, and that may be why I enjoyed them more; the writing had to be tighter.Wimsey and Egg are both excellent detective characters with their own foibles and idiosyncrasies without being isolating or offputting. I’m a particular fan of Egg’s little rhymes from The Salesman’s Handbook.The stories did occasionally tend to the darker side which was less to my taste, but others may prefer it as a little less cozy and cloying than many of this style.A great collection and I will be looking out for more.more
A collection of short stories featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Montagu Egg. They're quite a fun read, even if some of the stories are slighty surreal and they don’t bring anything new to the Wimsey story.more
Four Peter Wimsey stories, including the frankly barking 'The Incredible Elopement of Lord Peter Wimsey' in which Wimsey turns up in Basque country pretending to be a magician, six Montague Egg stories ('Maher-shalal-hashbaz' is not recommended for cat lovers; and, again, who nowadays would consider that as a name for a cat?), and two standalones. Not as good as the Wimsey novels, but a decent, quick read.more
Sayers gives us a dozen short mysteries: four featuring Lord Peter Wimsey, six featuring effervescent salesman Montague Egg, and two others. The Wimsey stories were the best for me, because I was familiar with Lord Peter from several novels and could fill in many details about his character. The stories are fun excursions into the sorts of elaborate arrangements Lord Peter can make to solve a crime. I have never seen Monty Egg in a novel, or heard of one that features him. He is another fun character, endlessly quoting rhyming couplets from a salesman's handbook, and applying his arcane knowledge to solve crimes that he happens to trip over. The two other stories are unremarkable.A mystery of such brevity is of necessity a very different creature from a book-length puzzle. We don't see a lot of detective work, or lengthy puzzling over clues; there just isn't room. The stories are primarily a matter of seeing a detective (though not a pro in these cases) presented with a troublesome case and solving it through an ingenious insight. These were enjoyable because of the characters and Sayers's suitably breezy style.more
A collection of short stories, some about Lord Peter.more
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Reviews

This collection of 12 short stories, predominantly featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Montague Egg, are a gentle introduction to Ms. Sayers’ writing. Each is neatly self-contained and the answer revealed in a gentlemanly flourish without arrogance (such as that of M. Poirot).I’ve not read any Sayers before, but after Alex was raving about a Wimsey mystery, this little collection was just right. The short stories are a bit shorter (12 in 256 pages) than the set of Christie short stories I reviewed, and that may be why I enjoyed them more; the writing had to be tighter.Wimsey and Egg are both excellent detective characters with their own foibles and idiosyncrasies without being isolating or offputting. I’m a particular fan of Egg’s little rhymes from The Salesman’s Handbook.The stories did occasionally tend to the darker side which was less to my taste, but others may prefer it as a little less cozy and cloying than many of this style.A great collection and I will be looking out for more.more
A collection of short stories featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Montagu Egg. They're quite a fun read, even if some of the stories are slighty surreal and they don’t bring anything new to the Wimsey story.more
Four Peter Wimsey stories, including the frankly barking 'The Incredible Elopement of Lord Peter Wimsey' in which Wimsey turns up in Basque country pretending to be a magician, six Montague Egg stories ('Maher-shalal-hashbaz' is not recommended for cat lovers; and, again, who nowadays would consider that as a name for a cat?), and two standalones. Not as good as the Wimsey novels, but a decent, quick read.more
Sayers gives us a dozen short mysteries: four featuring Lord Peter Wimsey, six featuring effervescent salesman Montague Egg, and two others. The Wimsey stories were the best for me, because I was familiar with Lord Peter from several novels and could fill in many details about his character. The stories are fun excursions into the sorts of elaborate arrangements Lord Peter can make to solve a crime. I have never seen Monty Egg in a novel, or heard of one that features him. He is another fun character, endlessly quoting rhyming couplets from a salesman's handbook, and applying his arcane knowledge to solve crimes that he happens to trip over. The two other stories are unremarkable.A mystery of such brevity is of necessity a very different creature from a book-length puzzle. We don't see a lot of detective work, or lengthy puzzling over clues; there just isn't room. The stories are primarily a matter of seeing a detective (though not a pro in these cases) presented with a troublesome case and solving it through an ingenious insight. These were enjoyable because of the characters and Sayers's suitably breezy style.more
A collection of short stories, some about Lord Peter.more
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