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“An extraordinary achievement . . . a vision of hell so stern it cannot be chuckled or raged aside.”—The New York Times Book Review

A classic of postwar American literature, Last Exit to Brooklyn created shock waves upon its release in 1964 with its raw, vibrant language and startling revelations of New York City’s underbelly. 
 
The prostitutes, drunks, addicts, and johns of Selby’s Brooklyn are fierce and lonely creatures, desperately searching for a moment of transcendence amidst the decay and brutality of the waterfront—though none have any real hope of escape. 
 
Last Exit to Brooklyn offers a disturbing yet hauntingly sensitive portrayal of American life, and nearly fifty years after publication, it stands as a crucial and masterful work of modern fiction. 
 
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Hubert Selby Jr. including rare photos from the author’s estate.

Topics: Abuse, New York City, Drugs, Sex, Crime, Prostitution, LGBTQ, Dark, Gritty, Suspenseful, Realism, Modernism, Brooklyn, Urban, Short stories, Debut, and 1950s

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Jun 1, 1965
ISBN: 9781453235393
List price: $14.99
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I liked this movie, although, I would have preferred Tra-lala's and Georgie's portions to be longer. I think Tra-la-la's rape scene is one of the most gruelling read I have had.read more
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Selby was a one-off, and I loved in particular his idiosyncratic use of punctuation (writing “don’tâ€? as “don/tâ€?, zum Beispiel). This was the first book I read by him and it was just amazing how much power his words packed.read more
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okay, i admit it, i jumped on the Selby Jr. bandwagon along with every other self-described hipster who saw Aronofsky's adaptation of 'Requiem for a Dream'

however, this book is so much more intimate than 'requiem'. granted, the visceral depictions of violence, rape, and drug-abuse can be unsettling and shocking, even today. yet, Selby, Jr. portrays the lives of the destitute with an empathy reminiscent of Nathanael West of Nelson Algren. indeed, any author that can make you really feel for drug-addicted transvestites and hyper-violent gang-leaders is an author with a very special gift.

(Re-read in January 2013 after listening to 'Fitzpleasure' by Alt-J. Still trying to figure out how/why they wrote a song about one of the most uncomfortably awful scenes in all of literature.)read more
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I liked this movie, although, I would have preferred Tra-lala's and Georgie's portions to be longer. I think Tra-la-la's rape scene is one of the most gruelling read I have had.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Selby was a one-off, and I loved in particular his idiosyncratic use of punctuation (writing “don’tâ€? as “don/tâ€?, zum Beispiel). This was the first book I read by him and it was just amazing how much power his words packed.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
okay, i admit it, i jumped on the Selby Jr. bandwagon along with every other self-described hipster who saw Aronofsky's adaptation of 'Requiem for a Dream'

however, this book is so much more intimate than 'requiem'. granted, the visceral depictions of violence, rape, and drug-abuse can be unsettling and shocking, even today. yet, Selby, Jr. portrays the lives of the destitute with an empathy reminiscent of Nathanael West of Nelson Algren. indeed, any author that can make you really feel for drug-addicted transvestites and hyper-violent gang-leaders is an author with a very special gift.

(Re-read in January 2013 after listening to 'Fitzpleasure' by Alt-J. Still trying to figure out how/why they wrote a song about one of the most uncomfortably awful scenes in all of literature.)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It seems like whenever I hear about the 1950s people tend to talk about how wholesome and pleasant it was. One would think that nothing untoward or degrading ever happened. We all know that isn't true, and if you don't believe me read Last Exit to Brooklyn. It is more than just a story about a neighborhood in New York; hell, I wouldn't even call it a novel. It is more like a synopsis to impoverished, urban American culture in general. It is a string of interconnected characters moving tangentially yet chaotically out of control.I've read some pretty rough, crude, scary stuff, but this one takes the cake. It has everything: neighborhood ruffians/criminals; cross-dressing, drug-addicted prostitutes; sluts; rapists; closet homosexuals that sink so low as to molest children; wife beaters; child neglectors. I mean, this book is really sick.I wasn't sure I liked the book until the final part, the coda. When I began reading this, I finally understood the method to Selby's madness. This part is a day in the life of the projects. Moving from individual to individual and family to family, the reader meets, parts from, and re-meets people and sees their situations and circumstances. None of them are good. This book takes those wholesome images and shoves them right up the reader's ass, twists, and then leaves them there. Truly, you don't leave this book quite the same person.
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Whoa, I still can't get over the honesty in these pages. A sordid side of American culture in the 50's, comprised of poverty, prostitution, alcoholism, drugs, sexual perversion - a far cry from Leave it to Beaver. This book must have had a lot of people up in arms with its publication. Not for the faint of heart, to be sure.
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Not for the faint of heart. Hard to imagine this work was published over 40 years ago. Reading Last Exit left me feeling emotionally drained. The book depicts a group of vile low-life criminals, hookers, drag queens, dealers and addicts. It's a relentless journey into America's underbelly post WWII. The prose is raw, crude, hellish and dark. I'm not sure why I even kept reading. I did though. The second and third read years later allowed me to appreciate the fact that this was Selby's debut novel. Within Selby's nightmare is something beautiful and raw. If you haven't read any of his other works, read this one later.
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