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While ringing in the New Year, Lord Peter stumbles into an ominous country mystery

Lord Peter Wimsey and his manservant Bunter are halfway across the wild flatlands of East Anglia when they make a wrong turn, straight into a ditch. They scramble over the rough country to the nearest church, where they find hospitality, dinner, and an invitation to go bell-ringing. This ancient art is steeped in mathematical complexities, and tonight the rector and his friends plan to embark on a 9-hour marathon session to welcome the New Year. Lord Peter joins them, taking a step into a society whose cheerful exterior hides a dark, deadly past.
 
During their stay in this unfamiliar countryside, Lord Peter and Bunter encounter murder, a mutilated corpse, and a decades-old jewel theft for which locals continue to die. In this land where bells toll for the dead, the ancient chimes never seem to stop.
 
The Nine Tailors is the 11th book in the Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries, but you may enjoy the series by reading the books in any order.
 
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy L. Sayers including rare images from the Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College.

Topics: Nobility, Theft, Murder, Private Investigators, Death, Rituals, Secret Codes, Family, Secrets, Blackmail, England, Small Town, London, 1930s, Tense, Suspenseful, Third Person Narration, Series, Female Author, British Author, and 20th Century

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781453258941
List price: $9.99
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The Nine Tailors is really atmospheric. More so than the other Wimsey books I can think of: there's a real sense of the surrounding countryside and the concerns of the people living there. I liked the detail about the bell ringing -- I didn't understand it, but it was interesting, and the idea of ringing the nine tailors for a dead man sort of stuck with me. It helps that a couple of people I follow on Twitter and Dreamwidth are bell ringers. I vaguely recognised some of the terms.

The mystery itself, I figured out relatively fast, by leaps of intuition rather than attention to detail. I knew that the bells had to have something to do with it beyond the obvious, and I knew that it was just too good to be true that Deacon had died and was so well out of the way.

This one has Lord Peter and Bunter, and even a spot of Parker, but no Lady Mary, and no Harriet Vane. Sigh.

I swear the surname 'Gotobed' pops up everywhere in detective novels and never anywhere else...more
This is a wonderful novel. From the first scenes set in the bleak and snowy Fens countryside, Sayers works her magic. The landscape, the church bells, the superbly-drawn characters and the mystery (well, two mysteries) are expertly woven together to make a supremely satisfying whole. Novels that take the reader to another time and place are, in my opinion, the best novels of all. This one does that for me.more
A pretty good mystery, but definitely heavy on the info dumps about British church bells. Lots of Bunter, though! I love me some Bunter. And the ending was very good. Also, a very classic premise - everyone loves a jewel hunt.

Definitely figured out the ending as soon as we got the requisite information, yet our detective was still confused; I shake my head at you, Peter Wimsey.more
While the detail about change-ringing made my eyes glaze over, the leisurely pace and attention to setting were for once pleasant rather than tedious, and the central mystery was fascinatingly wrapped up in the personal politics of class differences, the Great War, thieves' honor, and the peculiar architecture of churches. (Also featuring one of the more horrifying ways to die I've ever encountered.) Good stuff.more
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Reviews

The Nine Tailors is really atmospheric. More so than the other Wimsey books I can think of: there's a real sense of the surrounding countryside and the concerns of the people living there. I liked the detail about the bell ringing -- I didn't understand it, but it was interesting, and the idea of ringing the nine tailors for a dead man sort of stuck with me. It helps that a couple of people I follow on Twitter and Dreamwidth are bell ringers. I vaguely recognised some of the terms.

The mystery itself, I figured out relatively fast, by leaps of intuition rather than attention to detail. I knew that the bells had to have something to do with it beyond the obvious, and I knew that it was just too good to be true that Deacon had died and was so well out of the way.

This one has Lord Peter and Bunter, and even a spot of Parker, but no Lady Mary, and no Harriet Vane. Sigh.

I swear the surname 'Gotobed' pops up everywhere in detective novels and never anywhere else...more
This is a wonderful novel. From the first scenes set in the bleak and snowy Fens countryside, Sayers works her magic. The landscape, the church bells, the superbly-drawn characters and the mystery (well, two mysteries) are expertly woven together to make a supremely satisfying whole. Novels that take the reader to another time and place are, in my opinion, the best novels of all. This one does that for me.more
A pretty good mystery, but definitely heavy on the info dumps about British church bells. Lots of Bunter, though! I love me some Bunter. And the ending was very good. Also, a very classic premise - everyone loves a jewel hunt.

Definitely figured out the ending as soon as we got the requisite information, yet our detective was still confused; I shake my head at you, Peter Wimsey.more
While the detail about change-ringing made my eyes glaze over, the leisurely pace and attention to setting were for once pleasant rather than tedious, and the central mystery was fascinatingly wrapped up in the personal politics of class differences, the Great War, thieves' honor, and the peculiar architecture of churches. (Also featuring one of the more horrifying ways to die I've ever encountered.) Good stuff.more
I'm a fan of Peter Wimsey, and this is far and away the best of his adventures. Sayers is at the top of her form here. The mystery is complex and satisfying, but her depiction of the place and time is absolutely perfect, and Wimsey is shown here at his best - well rounded, intelligent, considerate and fun. He has recovered from the horrors of the war that were still making him a bundle of nerves in his earlier books, and Sayers was not yet tired of him and trying to make him go away so she could write what she thought of as her "important" work. This works beautifully as a stand alone novel, for anyone who hasn't read any of this series yet.Peter is driving across the Fens in mid-winter, and successfully wrecks his car. He ends of spending several days in a small village, and among other things, steps in as a bell ringer when one of the regulars gets sick. Several months later, he is invited back, because a mutilated body has been discovered in the churchyard. Obviously, it goes on from there.more
Truly, one of my favorite Sayers novels. Not for the person who enjoys your topics chewing-gum mystery. This is not only a complex piece of detective fiction, but a love/hate letter to East Anglia, a cultural history of English bells and change-ringing, and a meditation on what truly constitutes"crime" and "justice." This is also the book that need me understand why Lord Peter needed to be the second son--were he the Duke of Denver, he'd never have the freedom to indulge his many arcane hobbies--including detective work.more
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