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While ringing in the New Year, Lord Peter stumbles into an ominous country mystery

Lord Peter Wimsey and his manservant Bunter are halfway across the wild flatlands of East Anglia when they make a wrong turn, straight into a ditch. They scramble over the rough country to the nearest church, where they find hospitality, dinner, and an invitation to go bell-ringing. This ancient art is steeped in mathematical complexities, and tonight the rector and his friends plan to embark on a 9-hour marathon session to welcome the New Year. Lord Peter joins them, taking a step into a society whose cheerful exterior hides a dark, deadly past.
 
During their stay in this unfamiliar countryside, Lord Peter and Bunter encounter murder, a mutilated corpse, and a decades-old jewel theft for which locals continue to die. In this land where bells toll for the dead, the ancient chimes never seem to stop.
 
The Nine Tailors is the 11th book in the Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries, but you may enjoy the series by reading the books in any order.
 
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy L. Sayers including rare images from the Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College.

Topics: England, Small Town, Death, Theft, Family, Murder, London, Secrets, Suspenseful, Private Investigators, Female Author, Rituals, British Author, 20th Century, Blackmail, Nobility, Third Person Narration, Tense, 1930s, Secret Codes, and Series

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Jul 31, 2012
ISBN: 9781453258941
List price: $9.99
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Truly, one of my favorite Sayers novels. Not for the person who enjoys your topics chewing-gum mystery. This is not only a complex piece of detective fiction, but a love/hate letter to East Anglia, a cultural history of English bells and change-ringing, and a meditation on what truly constitutes"crime" and "justice." This is also the book that need me understand why Lord Peter needed to be the second son--were he the Duke of Denver, he'd never have the freedom to indulge his many arcane hobbies--including detective work.read more
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This is easily the best of the fine Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. Its evocative style, memorable characters, and satisfying plot will keep you entertained on the proverbial Dark and Stormy Night. New Year's Eve, when most of the action in this book takes place, is an overrated night out; instead, put a log on the fire, pour a tot of brandy, and spend the evening indulging in the wild weather and deep mysteries of Fenchurch St. Paul.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
We’ve been having a bit of a Peter Wimsey orgy of late – hey, there are worse ways to spend your time – partly due to getting the boxed set of Ian Carmichael’s Wimsey for Christmas, and partly because heck, why not? I went back to this particular title because the Carmichael version devotes the entire first episode to depicting the crime that, whilst being at the heart of the novel, takes place twenty years before. The attempt by the 1970s BBC make-up department to transform Carmichael who, at fiftysomething, was already too old for the role, into a 24-year-old Wimsey on the eve of the Great War really has to be seen to be believed. But I digress.Wimsey and Bunter are stranded in a remote Fenland village in a snowstorm on New Year’s Eve. They are rescued by the Rector, who gives them a bed for the night; Wimsey goes some way toward repaying his kindness by standing in for a sick villager to take part in a record-breaking round of bell-ringing. Three months later, the Rector contacts Wimsey in some distress: a disfigured body has been found in the graveyard. Wimsey returns to the village, makes his enquiries, and gets to the heart of the matter – not with entirely happy results or consequences.This is one of Sayers’s later Wimseys, and shows her at her full strength as a novelist – and Wimsey at his full strength as a character. That it’s a detective story, albeit a far from conventional one, is almost by the way; it’s a beautifully detailed portrait of a village community between the Wars, steeped in the mythology of the Church of England, detailed and intricate and unforgettable.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Truly, one of my favorite Sayers novels. Not for the person who enjoys your topics chewing-gum mystery. This is not only a complex piece of detective fiction, but a love/hate letter to East Anglia, a cultural history of English bells and change-ringing, and a meditation on what truly constitutes"crime" and "justice." This is also the book that need me understand why Lord Peter needed to be the second son--were he the Duke of Denver, he'd never have the freedom to indulge his many arcane hobbies--including detective work.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is easily the best of the fine Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. Its evocative style, memorable characters, and satisfying plot will keep you entertained on the proverbial Dark and Stormy Night. New Year's Eve, when most of the action in this book takes place, is an overrated night out; instead, put a log on the fire, pour a tot of brandy, and spend the evening indulging in the wild weather and deep mysteries of Fenchurch St. Paul.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
We’ve been having a bit of a Peter Wimsey orgy of late – hey, there are worse ways to spend your time – partly due to getting the boxed set of Ian Carmichael’s Wimsey for Christmas, and partly because heck, why not? I went back to this particular title because the Carmichael version devotes the entire first episode to depicting the crime that, whilst being at the heart of the novel, takes place twenty years before. The attempt by the 1970s BBC make-up department to transform Carmichael who, at fiftysomething, was already too old for the role, into a 24-year-old Wimsey on the eve of the Great War really has to be seen to be believed. But I digress.Wimsey and Bunter are stranded in a remote Fenland village in a snowstorm on New Year’s Eve. They are rescued by the Rector, who gives them a bed for the night; Wimsey goes some way toward repaying his kindness by standing in for a sick villager to take part in a record-breaking round of bell-ringing. Three months later, the Rector contacts Wimsey in some distress: a disfigured body has been found in the graveyard. Wimsey returns to the village, makes his enquiries, and gets to the heart of the matter – not with entirely happy results or consequences.This is one of Sayers’s later Wimseys, and shows her at her full strength as a novelist – and Wimsey at his full strength as a character. That it’s a detective story, albeit a far from conventional one, is almost by the way; it’s a beautifully detailed portrait of a village community between the Wars, steeped in the mythology of the Church of England, detailed and intricate and unforgettable.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Excellent. Best Sayers Wimsey mystery I've read. Whodunit to the last couple of pages. Wonderful sense of place and an introduction to that very British hobby, change ringing as an added treat.
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Wimsey is asked by an old acquaintance to help with a corpse that has been found in the churchyard. The Nine Taylors from the title revere to the bells that are rung in the book, apparently an old tradition.Great read, Lord Peter is still one of my favourite Golden Age characters.
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A re-read of an old favorite. Great mystery; literary writing style; imparts un-useful but thorough knowledge about change-ringing of church bells.
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