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When a museum guard takes a tumble, Sarah and Max find a forgery

It has only been a few months since Sarah Kelling’s elderly husband passed away, and she is struggling to adapt to life as a penniless young widow. To make ends meet, she converts her stately Boston home into a boardinghouse, a decision that brings something even better than money: the company of art-fraud investigator Max Bittersohn. The budding couple is standing on a balcony, recovering from a second-rate concert at a third-rate museum, when something plummets past them. The museum has been robbed, and a guard has fallen to his death.
 
Dozens of priceless paintings have been stolen and replaced with forgeries, and to recover these masterworks will mean tearing the lid off the quiet life of the Boston upper crust. But it is a chance Sarah and Max must take, lest they join the guard on his long trip down.
Published: MysteriousPress.com Open Road an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Oct 2, 2012
ISBN: 9781453277393
List price: $9.99
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The third Max and Sarah book. This one has never been nearly as much of a favorite as the first two, despite having the actual boardinghouse setting that disappears later in the series. The "hep-cat" art forgery scene just seemed too silly for me.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Substance: Delightful romantic-mystery romp through high-ish society. Hasthe flavor of an earlier decade except for the lightly risqué episodes ( such as 1960s romantic movies). Reasonably decent mystery, fair clues. Style: Light humor.Will definitely look for more of MacLeod's work.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It always takes me a while to get into the story. Sarah Kelling and her assorted friends and relatives are - distinctly weird, in many ways. The beginning, with a death and a mystery, feels awkward and uninteresting. But then I get caught up in the story and the characters, as they start to expand from the initial cardboard list of quirks and turn into people I can believe exist; the mystery expands in several directions, and I'm firmly drawn in. The romances are sweet - Sarah and Max make some progress, among others - the mystery is far less obvious than it seems at the beginning, and by the end of the book I'm grinning and remembering why I like these stories. Charlotte MacLeod's style is to have characters do some very odd things, believing them to be perfectly normal. Sarah has Boston and specifically Kelling quirks - strong frugality, long-held grudges, and odd family history - behind some of her choices; they strike me as odd but believable. The Grub-and-Stakers mysteries are over the top for me - my disbelief gets strangled from being suspended so high. The Madoc Rhys mysteries, on the other hand, make a good deal of sense - they're my favorite MacLeods. The Kelling ones are in between - the first few are reasonable, then they get weird. This one is still reasonable.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

The third Max and Sarah book. This one has never been nearly as much of a favorite as the first two, despite having the actual boardinghouse setting that disappears later in the series. The "hep-cat" art forgery scene just seemed too silly for me.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Substance: Delightful romantic-mystery romp through high-ish society. Hasthe flavor of an earlier decade except for the lightly risqué episodes ( such as 1960s romantic movies). Reasonably decent mystery, fair clues. Style: Light humor.Will definitely look for more of MacLeod's work.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It always takes me a while to get into the story. Sarah Kelling and her assorted friends and relatives are - distinctly weird, in many ways. The beginning, with a death and a mystery, feels awkward and uninteresting. But then I get caught up in the story and the characters, as they start to expand from the initial cardboard list of quirks and turn into people I can believe exist; the mystery expands in several directions, and I'm firmly drawn in. The romances are sweet - Sarah and Max make some progress, among others - the mystery is far less obvious than it seems at the beginning, and by the end of the book I'm grinning and remembering why I like these stories. Charlotte MacLeod's style is to have characters do some very odd things, believing them to be perfectly normal. Sarah has Boston and specifically Kelling quirks - strong frugality, long-held grudges, and odd family history - behind some of her choices; they strike me as odd but believable. The Grub-and-Stakers mysteries are over the top for me - my disbelief gets strangled from being suspended so high. The Madoc Rhys mysteries, on the other hand, make a good deal of sense - they're my favorite MacLeods. The Kelling ones are in between - the first few are reasonable, then they get weird. This one is still reasonable.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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