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When blood stains his family name, Lord Peter fights to save what he holds most dear

After 3 months in Corsica, Lord Peter Wimsey has begun to forget that the gray, dangerous moors of England ever existed. But traveling through Paris, he receives a shock that jolts him back to reality. He sees it in the headlines splashed across every English paper—his brother Gerald has been arrested for murder.
 
The trouble began at the family estate in Yorkshire, where Gerald was hunting with the man soon to be his brother-in-law, Captain Denis Cathcart. One night, Gerald confronts Cathcart with allegations about his unsavory past, leading the captain to call off the wedding. Just a few hours later, Cathcart is dead, with Gerald presumed to be the only person who could have fired the fatal shot. The clock is ticking, and only England’s premier sleuth can get to the bottom of this murky mystery.
 
Clouds of Witness is the 2nd book in the Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries, but you may enjoy the series by reading the books in any order.
 
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy L. Sayers including rare images from the Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College.

Topics: Nobility, Siblings, Murder, Adultery, Sisters, Secrets, Love, Family, Death, England, Secret Lovers, 1920s, Adventurous, Suspenseful, Funny, Tense, Series, Female Author, British Author, and 20th Century

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781453258859
List price: $9.99
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I do like Lord Peter. I was surprised at how little of him there was in this one, considering the family connection. In the first book, there were hints at his PTSD and such, but I didn't feel like the narrative of this book was as close to him. He wasn't so annoying, either, in his speech or attitude: part of that was probably knowing what to expect, of course, but still, it all felt somewhat toned down in this one, and not much by way of overarching plot seemed to happen -- I'm told it will, later on; I'm just eagerly watching out for it.

This one's a good mystery. Plenty of red herrings to keep one occupied, but not so difficult that it doesn't come straight near the end. Some things I got ahead of time, too, but not everything, which nicely balances the need to feel clever with the need for mystery to keep one reading.

The scenes/transcripts from court got perhaps a little too long-winded, but for the most part I found it nicely paced and easy to read.

Definitely a fun one.more
Love the writing and the dialogue of the different characters - it brings an era of England to life. the mystery itself is pretty good, too. lots of twists, where you think you're done and have figured it out... but no, you're not quite right.more
Still good fun, although I found the pace and complexity a little much after Whose Body? and the ending not entirely satisfactory - it seemed like it was all red herrings until the clue was produced literally in the nick of time that changed everything. Not bad, but not my favorite so far.more
When Lord Peter Wimsey finds out his brother the Duke has been accused of murder, he hightails it over to try to sort it out. Who really killed his sister's fiance, Denis Cathcart? Lord Peter may find out a few family secrets by the time he's finished detecting...This entertaining second book in the Lord Peter Wimsey series could easily be read as a standalone. Lord Peter reminds me a lot of Bertie Wooster with his prattling and his valet. The twists and turns of the plot kept me guessing until quite close to the end. The adventures of Lord Peter as he gets to the bottom of things generally kept me amused, and sometimes provoked a laugh. I didn't fall head-over-heels in love with it, but I'd be willing to keep reading the series.more
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Reviews

I do like Lord Peter. I was surprised at how little of him there was in this one, considering the family connection. In the first book, there were hints at his PTSD and such, but I didn't feel like the narrative of this book was as close to him. He wasn't so annoying, either, in his speech or attitude: part of that was probably knowing what to expect, of course, but still, it all felt somewhat toned down in this one, and not much by way of overarching plot seemed to happen -- I'm told it will, later on; I'm just eagerly watching out for it.

This one's a good mystery. Plenty of red herrings to keep one occupied, but not so difficult that it doesn't come straight near the end. Some things I got ahead of time, too, but not everything, which nicely balances the need to feel clever with the need for mystery to keep one reading.

The scenes/transcripts from court got perhaps a little too long-winded, but for the most part I found it nicely paced and easy to read.

Definitely a fun one.more
Love the writing and the dialogue of the different characters - it brings an era of England to life. the mystery itself is pretty good, too. lots of twists, where you think you're done and have figured it out... but no, you're not quite right.more
Still good fun, although I found the pace and complexity a little much after Whose Body? and the ending not entirely satisfactory - it seemed like it was all red herrings until the clue was produced literally in the nick of time that changed everything. Not bad, but not my favorite so far.more
When Lord Peter Wimsey finds out his brother the Duke has been accused of murder, he hightails it over to try to sort it out. Who really killed his sister's fiance, Denis Cathcart? Lord Peter may find out a few family secrets by the time he's finished detecting...This entertaining second book in the Lord Peter Wimsey series could easily be read as a standalone. Lord Peter reminds me a lot of Bertie Wooster with his prattling and his valet. The twists and turns of the plot kept me guessing until quite close to the end. The adventures of Lord Peter as he gets to the bottom of things generally kept me amused, and sometimes provoked a laugh. I didn't fall head-over-heels in love with it, but I'd be willing to keep reading the series.more
Where I got the book: purchased on Kindle. A re-read. [I find LibraryThing's method of handling editions confusing - I would never buy the CreateSpace version listed here. The Wimsey series just cries out for a really good boxed-set edition, but failing that, the one to collect, if you can, is the Gollancz hardcover.]One thing I always appreciate about the Wimsey stories is that each book has a distinct character. In Clouds of Witness the pace is fast and frenetic, with a wildly confusing murder mystery at the center, and yet Sayers does more to develop her characters here than in some of the other books. The mystery itself almost takes second place to the doings of Wimsey's family, placing Wimsey himself very firmly in a distinct social setting, his home turf where he seems more real than in many of the other books. He doesn't show off nearly as much when he's in the countryside, either; I can't help feeling that, titles aside, this is a depiction of the sort of society Sayers was raised in before she went off to London.I also enjoy the sketch of Wimsey's sister Lady Mary Wimsey, who turns up in later novels but only as a cardboard cutout (his brother Gerald never gets his character developed, which is a great shame). Watching Parker go all chivalrous and defensive of her is always amusing, albeit out of character. Mary is real in this book: later on, the Wimsey family becomes more and more a caricature of a noble English household, and Mary becomes a boring housewife, alas. Plenty happens to Wimsey in this book: he gets chased by dogs, shot, falls into a bog, and flies across the Atlantic (in the 1920s that was a noteworthy adventure). I have never seen a bullet wound heal with such great speed and thoroughness.There is an absolutely priceless little cameo of two writers talking about the trends of the day, something Sayers is able to pick up in the later novels once she writes herself in as Wimsey's love interest when Harriet Vane comes along.I absolutely zipped through this novel (which was supposed to be strictly a post-workout cool down read but ended up as a Main Book) despite having read it several times before. And that really defines the enduring success of the Wimsey novels; they're downright entertaining, and despite (or because of?) being set so firmly in a lost era, never seem to age.more
The second book in her Lord Peter Wimsey series, Clouds of Witness has Lord Peter trying to clear his brother of a murder charge. Aided by his faithful valet, Bunter, and his police Chief Inspector friend, Parker, they embark on witness interviewing and clue gathering, knowing full well that Lord Denver is incapable of murder, even though he refuses to alibi himself.With their ingenious detective skills they wade through the evidence, and realize that Lord Denver is not the only one who is not telling the exact truth, Lord Peter’s sister Mary, who was the fiancée of the murder victim, is also bending the facts and evading the truth.With great skill Dorothy L. Sayers weaves a delightful mystery with multiple storylines and a few red herrings to keep the reader on their toes. Lord Peter is a intriguing character, and one that I definitely want to continue to follow. I particularly love the brittle, humorous dialogue that puts an upper crust edge to this story of clearing the family name.more
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