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Halberstam’s classic #1 bestseller about the magical summer when baseball’s fiercest rivalry captured the nation’s imagination, and changed the sport forever
The summer of 1949: It was baseball’s Golden Age and the year Joe DiMaggio’s New York Yankees were locked in a soon-to-be classic battle with Ted Williams’s Boston Red Sox for the American League pennant. As postwar America looked for a unifying moment, the greatest players in baseball history brought their rivalry to the field, captivating the American public through the heart-pounding final moments of the season. This expansive story captures an era, incorporating profiles of the players and their families, fans, broadcasters, baseball executives, and sportswriters. Riveting in its blend of powerful detail and exhilarating narrative, The Summer of ’49 is Pulitzer Prize winner David Halberstam’s engrossing look at not only a sports rivalry, but a time when America’s very identity was wrapped up in its beloved national game. This ebook features an extended biography of David Halberstam.
Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Dec 18, 2012
ISBN: 9781453286111
List price: $9.99
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A bit on the soft and sentimental side, for sure, but really a pretty good look into an exciting and iconic pennant race in 1949.read more
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What I most appreciated about this Halberstam baseball book was his sense of the ends and beginnings of different eras in the evolution of the game: racial integration, the dawn of televised games, the last seasons of Joe DiMaggio's career and the beginning of the years of Yankee dominance through the 1950s. A great read!read more
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Read this when it originally came out in the mid-80's. It was well worth revisiting for Halberstam's terrific writing and portrait of DiMaggio, as well as a reminder of why free agency exists. Ball players were essentially indentured servants, all but a handful having to return to 'real world jobs' during the off season just to get by. Also worth it for the history lesson on the ongoing Yankees-Red Sox rivalry.read more
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A bit on the soft and sentimental side, for sure, but really a pretty good look into an exciting and iconic pennant race in 1949.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
What I most appreciated about this Halberstam baseball book was his sense of the ends and beginnings of different eras in the evolution of the game: racial integration, the dawn of televised games, the last seasons of Joe DiMaggio's career and the beginning of the years of Yankee dominance through the 1950s. A great read!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read this when it originally came out in the mid-80's. It was well worth revisiting for Halberstam's terrific writing and portrait of DiMaggio, as well as a reminder of why free agency exists. Ball players were essentially indentured servants, all but a handful having to return to 'real world jobs' during the off season just to get by. Also worth it for the history lesson on the ongoing Yankees-Red Sox rivalry.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"Summer of `49" focuses on the rivalry between the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees as they fought for first place during the Summer of 1949. This was before the days of the wild card and first place meant a trip to the playoffs while second place meant a trip home. The two teams fought for first place all season long and (perhaps fittingly) it all came down to the last game of the season. "Summer of `49" is an excellent book about baseball, the men that played it, the men who ran it, the men who called the games on the radio, and the fans who loved the game. Author David Halberstam focuses mostly on the players (rightfully so) and does an evenhanded job of portraying players on both teams. Halberstam provides a fascinating glimpse at players such as Ted Williams, Bobby Doerr, and Ellis Kinder of the Red Sox and Yogi Berra, Phil Rizzuto, and Vic Raschi of the Yankees. Equally interesting to read was the relationship between brothers Joe and Dom DiMaggio (Joe played for the Yankees while Dom played for the Red Sox). Also featured in the book are the managers of the Yankees and Red Sox - Casey Stengel and Joe McCarthy. Another person I found fascinating to read about and wish I had been able to hear announce games was Mel Allen. Halberstam also provides an interesting insight into what the game of baseball was like during the 1940's. It was an age when starting pitchers pitched entire games whenever possible and relief pitchers were not specialists; a time before the designated hitter; and a time before the wild card. I was not alive then, but as a once long-suffering Red Sox fan (2004 changed all that), I could picture how frustrating that year must have been for Boston fans. Halberstam does a good job of describing game action and I could feel the anguish of the Red Sox players and fans after that final game. Published in 1989, "Summer of '49" is a bit dated at the end (both Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams are still alive at the end of the book and Williams is developing a relationship with and yet to be manipulated by his son John Henry), but it is excellently done and I highly recommend it.
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This bbok was published in 1989 and is a history of the 1949 Ameican League pennant race, won on the last day of the seaon by he Yankees. There is much discussion of the Yankee and Red Sox players of that year, particularly of Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams. Much of the book was derived from interviews with the players 40 years later, but they seemed to remember well what happend. Since I am not an American League fan and since I haveys hated the Yankees the book could have been better but there is a lot interesting stuff in the book, and it provides quite a good insight into the thinking and behavior of players in 1949, when they made a lot less money than players do today.
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Halberstam gives a great slice of America in the late 1940's, through the Red Sox / Yankees rivalry. Even if you aren't a fan of either team (I'm not), the story of the players, managers, writers, and society at large is fascinating.
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