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Married at last, Lord Peter and Harriet find their honeymoon interrupted by a killer

It took several near-death experiences for Lord Peter Wimsey to convince Harriet Vane to be his wife, but she has finally relented. When the dapper detective marries Britain’s most popular mystery author—just a few short years after rescuing her from the hangman’s noose—the press could not be more excited. But Lord Peter and his bride have no interest in spending their wedding night surrounded by reporters. They sneak out of their own reception to begin their honeymoon early, out of sight of the world. Unfortunately, for some couples, calamity is inescapable.
 
On their 1st morning together, the newlyweds discover the house’s caretaker bludgeoned to death in the manor’s basement. If they thought finding a few minutes alone was difficult, they’re up against even steeper odds. In a house full of suspects, identifying the killer won’t be easy.
 
Busman’s Honeymoon is the 13th book in the Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries, but you may enjoy the series by reading the books in any order.
 
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy L. Sayers including rare images from the Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College.
 

Topics: Murder, Private Investigators, Death, Family, Love, Blackmail, Writers, Marriage, England, Small Town, London, 1930s, Suspenseful, Gripping, Witty, Series, Female Author, British Author, 20th Century, and Third Person Narration

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Jul 31, 2012
ISBN: 9781453258965
List price: $9.99
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“It has been said, by myself and others, that a love-interest is only an intrusion upon a detective story,” Sayers says in the dedication. “But to the characters involved, the detective-interest might well seem an irritating intrusion upon their love-story.” And that is exactly what happens here.

Lord Peter and the new Lady Peter, previously Miss Harriet Vane, have gone off to the country on their honeymoon. Peter has purchased an old Tudor manor-house for Harriet as a wedding present, and they move in in the middle of the night, having narrowly escaped floods of newspaper reporters. The house has not been aired, food has not been brought in, the chimneys have not been swept, but they topple into bed to deal with it in the morning. And in the morning, they discover a body in the basement – but not before having the housekeeper and the chimneysweep in, neatly destroying most of the potential clues.

I admit, I was a little worried at about a third of the way through the book. Large portions of it are from Harriet’s point of view, and she was having a difficult time juggling the demands of honeymoon and of a detecting husband all at the same time. I was afraid she was going to go all feminine and wifely. But she recognizes the impulse and throws it away, in one of the most wonderful scenes I have ever read. (And Lord Peter, being the wonderful person that he is, recognizes her achievement and is suitably humbled.)

This is very much a book about a romance. Just because the characters are already together doesn’t mean there’s no tension — the tension they’re dealing with is how to remain true to themselves while being married and madly in love, rather than the will they/won’t they tension of most romance stories. Of course they will; they are. (There’s a hilarious scene of double entendre toward the beginning with one of the new neighbors.) The question is, though, once you’ve fallen madly in love with someone, do you continue to treat them like a person or do you start to treat them like a fragile and precious object? And what happens to you if you do?

My favorite part about this book, though, was the ending. Once the murderer has been caught, there’s still the trial and execution to deal with. We’ve seen in earlier books that Peter doesn’t deal with that part well; he likes the investigation but he hates the fact that he, personally, is responsible for people being hanged. This is just the first time that we see his reactions in detail, and it’s heartbreaking and wonderful. Wonderful, of course, because now he has Harriet for support. I know there are more books in this series, finished from Sayers’ notes by Jill Paton Walsh, but this was such a perfect end to the series I don’t know that I’ll read them.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It's so romantic! Except for the dead guy.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lord Peter Wimsey and his bride, Harriet Vane, are caught up in a murder case while honeymooning in a newly acquired home in a small English village. We know, of course, that Lord Peter and his wife who shares his sleuthing talents, will solve the case. What we are allowed to witness in this book, however, is the personal cost to Lord Peter as he sends a man to his death. As an officer in WWI, Lord Peter was called upon to order many of his men into battles from which they did not return. Having a sensitive nature, he did not easily recover from this knowledge and suffers from nightmares and renewed psychological distress whenever confronted with being the agent to send a man once more to death no matter what crime has been committed. We also witness the healing qualities of a loving marriage as Harriet struggles to comfort and help him through this traumatic experience. A very literate book displaying the considerable intellectual breadth and depth of the mind of Dorothy Sayers.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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“It has been said, by myself and others, that a love-interest is only an intrusion upon a detective story,” Sayers says in the dedication. “But to the characters involved, the detective-interest might well seem an irritating intrusion upon their love-story.” And that is exactly what happens here.

Lord Peter and the new Lady Peter, previously Miss Harriet Vane, have gone off to the country on their honeymoon. Peter has purchased an old Tudor manor-house for Harriet as a wedding present, and they move in in the middle of the night, having narrowly escaped floods of newspaper reporters. The house has not been aired, food has not been brought in, the chimneys have not been swept, but they topple into bed to deal with it in the morning. And in the morning, they discover a body in the basement – but not before having the housekeeper and the chimneysweep in, neatly destroying most of the potential clues.

I admit, I was a little worried at about a third of the way through the book. Large portions of it are from Harriet’s point of view, and she was having a difficult time juggling the demands of honeymoon and of a detecting husband all at the same time. I was afraid she was going to go all feminine and wifely. But she recognizes the impulse and throws it away, in one of the most wonderful scenes I have ever read. (And Lord Peter, being the wonderful person that he is, recognizes her achievement and is suitably humbled.)

This is very much a book about a romance. Just because the characters are already together doesn’t mean there’s no tension — the tension they’re dealing with is how to remain true to themselves while being married and madly in love, rather than the will they/won’t they tension of most romance stories. Of course they will; they are. (There’s a hilarious scene of double entendre toward the beginning with one of the new neighbors.) The question is, though, once you’ve fallen madly in love with someone, do you continue to treat them like a person or do you start to treat them like a fragile and precious object? And what happens to you if you do?

My favorite part about this book, though, was the ending. Once the murderer has been caught, there’s still the trial and execution to deal with. We’ve seen in earlier books that Peter doesn’t deal with that part well; he likes the investigation but he hates the fact that he, personally, is responsible for people being hanged. This is just the first time that we see his reactions in detail, and it’s heartbreaking and wonderful. Wonderful, of course, because now he has Harriet for support. I know there are more books in this series, finished from Sayers’ notes by Jill Paton Walsh, but this was such a perfect end to the series I don’t know that I’ll read them.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It's so romantic! Except for the dead guy.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lord Peter Wimsey and his bride, Harriet Vane, are caught up in a murder case while honeymooning in a newly acquired home in a small English village. We know, of course, that Lord Peter and his wife who shares his sleuthing talents, will solve the case. What we are allowed to witness in this book, however, is the personal cost to Lord Peter as he sends a man to his death. As an officer in WWI, Lord Peter was called upon to order many of his men into battles from which they did not return. Having a sensitive nature, he did not easily recover from this knowledge and suffers from nightmares and renewed psychological distress whenever confronted with being the agent to send a man once more to death no matter what crime has been committed. We also witness the healing qualities of a loving marriage as Harriet struggles to comfort and help him through this traumatic experience. A very literate book displaying the considerable intellectual breadth and depth of the mind of Dorothy Sayers.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Silly, privileged neweds Harriet Vane and Lord Peter travel to their just purchased country home to find themselves locked out and a dead body in the basement. Bunter, valet-butler-chief-cook and bottle washer, must deal with the locals while keeping his Lordship's wine from getting jostled. Slapstick comedy/mystery of the 1930s type
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An old mystery classic. Not quite Agatha Christie, but lots of fun anyway. She uses many literary references, though, which is good and sometimes, a little annoying. Even for an English teacher!
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Accurately described as a "love story with intervals of detecting" not bad, but I prefer Murder Must Advertise or Lord Peter
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