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From the Publisher

Effective Program Models for Gifted Students From Underserved Populations provides coordinators, teachers, administrators, and other interested parties information about effective program models for underserved gifted students. The book highlights eight successful programs that have been designed to use with low-income, high-ability students. Each chapter focuses on a specific program and includes an introduction and brief overview of a model, how students are identified for the program, what talents are valued, the goals of the project, a description of the model, difficult issues and how they are addressed, important contributions of the program, research findings, how the program is sustained, and contact information.
Published: Sourcebooks on
ISBN: 9781618211576
List price: $29.95
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