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From the Publisher

This essential “how not to” guide explains how to act and what to say in the presence of police to avoid unnecessary arrests for petty offenses or mistakes in judgment that can lead to permanent disqualification from jobs, financing, and education. From what to do if a cop asks to search the car to dealing with a racial slur or how to handle a roach in the ashtray, this handbook details the nuances of dealing with the police. This revised and expanded edition of Arrest-Proof Yourself includes more than 100 pages of new information to reflect changes in police technique and “proactive policing.” More than 50 pages are dedicated to weaponry—including how to legally own and handle guns and knives and which firearms to use for self-defense—and updates examine topics such as the current surveillance state and the ability of police to track movements and activities using data drawn from cell phones and computers. Sprinkled with not only moral outrage but also the weird humor that permeates law enforcement, this urgent, eye-opening exposé has stories from 30 years of case files, making it the go-to guide to police procedures for all Americans.

Published: Chicago Review Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781613748077
List price: $13.99
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