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"One of the most important science fiction authors. Brunner held a mirror up to reflect our foibles because he wanted to save us from ourselves."
--SF Site

For each generation, there is a writer meant to bend the rules of what we know. Hugo Award winner (Best Novel, STAND ON ZANZIBAR) and British science fiction master John Brunner remains one of the most influential and respected authors of all time, and now E-Reads is pleased to re-introduce many of his classic works. For readers familiar with his vision, it's a chance to re-examine his thoughtful worlds and words, while for new readers, Brunner's work proves itself the very definition of timeless.

Among six hundred thousand stars visited by man, sixty thousand have planets hospitable to life, six thousand have developed life and six hundred have been settled, or seeded, with humanity. A vast vessel, known simply as Ship, travels an endless route, checking in with all the settled planets, observing, offering help where it can as some flourish, some falter but all change and evolve. Unexpectedly, Ship has developed feelings and intelligence and it struggles with human-like emotions as it sees the many ways that man can evolve or devolve when left to his own devices with the one eternal constant--change. 
Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Apr 1, 2014
ISBN: 9781497617544
List price: $5.99
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An intelligent but programming-bound ship which had seeded a bunch of planets with human colonies 500 years previously returns to retrace its earlier voyage and finds each and every one of the surviving colonies to be messed up in at least one big way. Along the way the Ship picks up the occasional imperiled colonist and transports him/her/them until they get to another planet they want to try.Some of the society building is reasonably well done, and the story gets mildly interesting during a couple of episodes, but all in all Brunner's final novel is fairly pedestrian. I never developed much empathy for any of the human characters or the Ship itself. The meta-story never really grabbed my attention and its final resolution was a puzzling yawner.The basic premise of this novel reminded me of the very disappointing Search the Sky by the otherwise generally reliable team of Frederik Pohl and Cyril Kornbluth. At least the society building here raised legitimate questions about the dysfunction of how large groups of humanity interact.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is the story a bunch of Human colonies being revisited 500 years after their founding by the Ship that ceded them. The novel as a whole is episodic, dealing with different protagonists having problems on their own colony and being extracted by the Ship. The Ship has its own problems which are what tie the episodes together. I got bored with the Ship and its problems and the sensawonda explanation of the Ship at the end didn't move me. However, I was amazed by the variety of the colony worlds. It's a tour-de-force of world building. I would recommend reading it for that aspect.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
an amusing little mystery. It was entertaining watching the problems the passengers faced as they decided what their ultimate fate would be.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

An intelligent but programming-bound ship which had seeded a bunch of planets with human colonies 500 years previously returns to retrace its earlier voyage and finds each and every one of the surviving colonies to be messed up in at least one big way. Along the way the Ship picks up the occasional imperiled colonist and transports him/her/them until they get to another planet they want to try.Some of the society building is reasonably well done, and the story gets mildly interesting during a couple of episodes, but all in all Brunner's final novel is fairly pedestrian. I never developed much empathy for any of the human characters or the Ship itself. The meta-story never really grabbed my attention and its final resolution was a puzzling yawner.The basic premise of this novel reminded me of the very disappointing Search the Sky by the otherwise generally reliable team of Frederik Pohl and Cyril Kornbluth. At least the society building here raised legitimate questions about the dysfunction of how large groups of humanity interact.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is the story a bunch of Human colonies being revisited 500 years after their founding by the Ship that ceded them. The novel as a whole is episodic, dealing with different protagonists having problems on their own colony and being extracted by the Ship. The Ship has its own problems which are what tie the episodes together. I got bored with the Ship and its problems and the sensawonda explanation of the Ship at the end didn't move me. However, I was amazed by the variety of the colony worlds. It's a tour-de-force of world building. I would recommend reading it for that aspect.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
an amusing little mystery. It was entertaining watching the problems the passengers faced as they decided what their ultimate fate would be.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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