Reader reviews for Cat's Cradle

This book is probably my favorite of Vonnegut and seems to best capture his style. It is more in line with the rest of his writings than Slaughterhouse Five.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Humorously debates the issue of an ultimate weapon.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've read a few Vonnegut books before, but this is the place to start to get a sense of his worldview. Dark humor at its best.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
So when did the modern novel take the wierd turn? Well, by "modern" I'm really thinking post-1950. You have Graeme Greene and George Orwell pumping out social commentary in a realist vein. Then along comes this absurdist tendency. Obviously I need to read some more...As for Cat's Cradle - yes, some clever stuff, some amusing stuff, even some profound stuff. I liked the narrator's initial reaction to seeing Mona's photo ("peace and plenty!") contrasted with the dippy-profound abstraction he finally pairs up with.But, overall, its hard to take such thinkly applied charicature seriously. It was an enjoyable and worthwhile read, but nothing on the profound and multi-layered experience of how novels can be written.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In Slaughter House Five Vonnegut took on war, sex and revenge. Here he takes on religion, not to attack it, but turn it inside so it might start to make sense again. PS the Grateful Dead publishing company for their music is called Ice Nine.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is almost a prequel to Stephen King's The Stand set in a Woody Allen-esque banana republic. Reminiscent of Gallapagos, a small band of unlikely characters is described in their paths toward each other, their isolation from 'humanity' and how they face and resolve earth-ending situations. While pleasantly there's no real mention of aliens, the book does have a solid science fiction component. It's not a commentary on combat like Slaughterhouse Five, but it does carry the common theme that the further away from war we are the less we have to face its reality; a chief character is a thinly veiled Einstein who happens to be-perhaps unlike Einstein-unfazed by his creation. An aspect of lewdness adds realism but little else, and some threads seem to end nowhere. A well-written, somewhat immature science fiction satire commenting on nuclear war and general human dynamics.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I bought this at an airport bookstore on a whim and enjoyed it immensely. Well written, slightly goofy, LOL a couple of times. This is how criticism can be really effective. Much better than hate speech.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A propelling narrative with odd characters. Vonnegut is convinced that we will destroy ourselves.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A light, easy to flip through book. The style is not particularly rich, but entertaining. The ideas are less so. I do not share the pessimism and fatalism expressed by the author.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This really wasn't my cup of tea, but I recognize it for what it is, an excellent apocalyptic novel, written with massive amounts of satire, dark humor, and cynicism. The protagonist, John, begins work writing a book about the first A-bomb, and gets mixed up with the inventor's children. Surprisingly enough, the creator of the bomb, who had already died, is ultimately responsible for the end of human life. Vonnegut creates an absurd fantasy world, full of lies, a parody of religion, propaganda, a new language, novel sexual practices, a midget, and John as president. Vonnegut's bleak and pessimistic view of science, mankind, and religion comes across loud and clear. The book was probably more applicable to previous times (Cold War, nuclear proliferation), but parallels can still be drawn in today's society.
Permalink · Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
scribd