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From the Publisher

Any person recovering from any life threatening illness will benifit from Embracing the Journey.Persons in early recovery from addictions of any kind will be inspired. Embracing the Journey would be an ideal book to provide for in-patents at any of the world's many addiction treatment centres.
Published: Morgan James Publishing on
ISBN: 9781600372414
List price: $9.99
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